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Individual differences in response to uncertainty and decision making: The role of behavioral inhibition system and need for closure.

Jaśko K, Czernatowicz-Kukuczka A, Kossowska M, Czarna AZ - Motiv Emot (2015)

Bottom Line: The results supported our predictions.When a task did not offer a confident decision rule, high NFC participants prolonged the information search more than low NFC individuals.These results are discussed within an uncertainty management framework.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Psychology, Jagiellonian University, al. Mickiewicza 3, 31-120 Kraków, Poland.

ABSTRACT

In two studies, we examined the influence of behavioral inhibition system (BIS) and need for closure (NFC) on information processing in decision making. We expected that BIS would regulate behavior in a decisional context and that this relationship would be mediated by epistemic motivation expressed by NFC. In addition, drawing on contradictory findings in the literature on anxiety, NFC, and information processing, we investigated the moderating role of decision rules. The results supported our predictions. BIS was strongly and positively related to NFC, and through NFC it was related to decision-making style. Moreover, decision task characteristics moderated the relationship between NFC and decision making. When a task did not offer a confident decision rule, high NFC participants prolonged the information search more than low NFC individuals. However, when a reliable strategy was suggested, high NFC participants behaved in line with it. These results are discussed within an uncertainty management framework.

No MeSH data available.


Decision time (Fixed Wins condition) as a function of NFC and rule manipulation (Study 2)
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Fig3: Decision time (Fixed Wins condition) as a function of NFC and rule manipulation (Study 2)

Mentions: The mediation model was significant in the FW round [F(7, 215) = 7.10, p < 0.001, R2 = 0.19]. BIS had a positive effect on NFC (b = 0.58, SE = 0.08, β = 0.43, p < 0.001). We found a significant interaction between NFC and the experimental manipulation (NFC × Low Anchor Condition b = −0.19, SE = 0.07, β = −0.43, p = 0.004; NFC × High Anchor Condition b = 0.01, SE = 0.07, β = 0.02, p = 0.902; for both interactions, R2-change = 0.04, F(2, 215) = 5.41, p = 0.005). Further analyses showed that the effect of NFC on decision time (in FW) was positive and significant in the control condition (b = 0.15, SE = 0.05, β = 0.32, p = 0.003) and in the high anchor condition (b = 0.16, SE = 0.06, β = 0.33, p = 0.005), but it was negative and not significant in the low anchor condition (b = −0.05, SE = 0.05, β = −0.10, p = 0.357). The visualization of this interaction is presented in Fig. 3.Fig. 3


Individual differences in response to uncertainty and decision making: The role of behavioral inhibition system and need for closure.

Jaśko K, Czernatowicz-Kukuczka A, Kossowska M, Czarna AZ - Motiv Emot (2015)

Decision time (Fixed Wins condition) as a function of NFC and rule manipulation (Study 2)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508368&req=5

Fig3: Decision time (Fixed Wins condition) as a function of NFC and rule manipulation (Study 2)
Mentions: The mediation model was significant in the FW round [F(7, 215) = 7.10, p < 0.001, R2 = 0.19]. BIS had a positive effect on NFC (b = 0.58, SE = 0.08, β = 0.43, p < 0.001). We found a significant interaction between NFC and the experimental manipulation (NFC × Low Anchor Condition b = −0.19, SE = 0.07, β = −0.43, p = 0.004; NFC × High Anchor Condition b = 0.01, SE = 0.07, β = 0.02, p = 0.902; for both interactions, R2-change = 0.04, F(2, 215) = 5.41, p = 0.005). Further analyses showed that the effect of NFC on decision time (in FW) was positive and significant in the control condition (b = 0.15, SE = 0.05, β = 0.32, p = 0.003) and in the high anchor condition (b = 0.16, SE = 0.06, β = 0.33, p = 0.005), but it was negative and not significant in the low anchor condition (b = −0.05, SE = 0.05, β = −0.10, p = 0.357). The visualization of this interaction is presented in Fig. 3.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: The results supported our predictions.When a task did not offer a confident decision rule, high NFC participants prolonged the information search more than low NFC individuals.These results are discussed within an uncertainty management framework.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Psychology, Jagiellonian University, al. Mickiewicza 3, 31-120 Kraków, Poland.

ABSTRACT

In two studies, we examined the influence of behavioral inhibition system (BIS) and need for closure (NFC) on information processing in decision making. We expected that BIS would regulate behavior in a decisional context and that this relationship would be mediated by epistemic motivation expressed by NFC. In addition, drawing on contradictory findings in the literature on anxiety, NFC, and information processing, we investigated the moderating role of decision rules. The results supported our predictions. BIS was strongly and positively related to NFC, and through NFC it was related to decision-making style. Moreover, decision task characteristics moderated the relationship between NFC and decision making. When a task did not offer a confident decision rule, high NFC participants prolonged the information search more than low NFC individuals. However, when a reliable strategy was suggested, high NFC participants behaved in line with it. These results are discussed within an uncertainty management framework.

No MeSH data available.