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The moderating role of specific self-efficacy in the impact of positive mood on cognitive performance.

Niemiec T, Lachowicz-Tabaczek K - Motiv Emot (2015)

Bottom Line: Hence, they would be more strongly motivated, and perform better on the task, than individuals in other moods.Results confirmed our hypothesis whereby specific self-efficacy affects cognitive performance but only during a positive mood.These findings support the role of specific self-efficacy in maintaining positive mood by regulating task activity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Psychology, University of Wroclaw, ul. Dawida 1, 50-527 Wrocław, Poland.

ABSTRACT

Research concerning the impact of positive mood on cognitive performance is inconsistent. We suggest that specific self-efficacy moderates this relationship. The current study proposed that participants in a positive mood with a high level of specific self-efficacy would anticipate mood-maintaining success on a task. Hence, they would be more strongly motivated, and perform better on the task, than individuals in other moods. Conversely, participants in a positive mood with low specific self-efficacy should expect mood-threatening failure. Thus, these individuals should be less motivated and perform more poorly than individuals in other moods. The current study included 139 participants with different levels of specific self-efficacy performing a comprehension task in either a positive or negative mood or a control condition. Results confirmed our hypothesis whereby specific self-efficacy affects cognitive performance but only during a positive mood. These findings support the role of specific self-efficacy in maintaining positive mood by regulating task activity.

No MeSH data available.


Cognitive task performance as a function of experimental condition and specific self-efficacy (SSE)
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Fig1: Cognitive task performance as a function of experimental condition and specific self-efficacy (SSE)

Mentions: Figure 1 illustrates the effects of experimental condition on cognitive performance among the higher (+1 SD) and lower (−1 SD) SSE individuals. Cognitive performance among higher SSE individuals (+1 SD) was significantly better in the positive mood condition than in the other two conditions (B = .88, SE = .36, t(133) = 2.47, p < .02). Lower SSE individuals (−1 SD) had lower cognitive performance in the positive mood condition than in the other two conditions (B = .88, SE = .35, t(133) = 2.47, p < .02).Fig. 1


The moderating role of specific self-efficacy in the impact of positive mood on cognitive performance.

Niemiec T, Lachowicz-Tabaczek K - Motiv Emot (2015)

Cognitive task performance as a function of experimental condition and specific self-efficacy (SSE)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508366&req=5

Fig1: Cognitive task performance as a function of experimental condition and specific self-efficacy (SSE)
Mentions: Figure 1 illustrates the effects of experimental condition on cognitive performance among the higher (+1 SD) and lower (−1 SD) SSE individuals. Cognitive performance among higher SSE individuals (+1 SD) was significantly better in the positive mood condition than in the other two conditions (B = .88, SE = .36, t(133) = 2.47, p < .02). Lower SSE individuals (−1 SD) had lower cognitive performance in the positive mood condition than in the other two conditions (B = .88, SE = .35, t(133) = 2.47, p < .02).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Hence, they would be more strongly motivated, and perform better on the task, than individuals in other moods.Results confirmed our hypothesis whereby specific self-efficacy affects cognitive performance but only during a positive mood.These findings support the role of specific self-efficacy in maintaining positive mood by regulating task activity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Psychology, University of Wroclaw, ul. Dawida 1, 50-527 Wrocław, Poland.

ABSTRACT

Research concerning the impact of positive mood on cognitive performance is inconsistent. We suggest that specific self-efficacy moderates this relationship. The current study proposed that participants in a positive mood with a high level of specific self-efficacy would anticipate mood-maintaining success on a task. Hence, they would be more strongly motivated, and perform better on the task, than individuals in other moods. Conversely, participants in a positive mood with low specific self-efficacy should expect mood-threatening failure. Thus, these individuals should be less motivated and perform more poorly than individuals in other moods. The current study included 139 participants with different levels of specific self-efficacy performing a comprehension task in either a positive or negative mood or a control condition. Results confirmed our hypothesis whereby specific self-efficacy affects cognitive performance but only during a positive mood. These findings support the role of specific self-efficacy in maintaining positive mood by regulating task activity.

No MeSH data available.