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A history of the term "DMARD".

Buer JK - Inflammopharmacology (2015)

Bottom Line: It then examines the usage of the terms "remission-inducing drugs" (RIDs) and "slow-acting anti-rheumatic drugs" (SAARDs), which for some years offered competition to the term DMARDs, thus underscoring the contingency of the establishment of DMARD as a word.Finally, it juxtaposes the apparently spontaneous emergence of the three terms DMARD, SAARD and RID, and the disappearance of the latter two, with a failed attempt in the early 1990s to replace these terms with the new term "disease-controlling antirheumatic treatment" (DC-ART).The analysis highlights the paradoxical qualities of the DMARD concept as robust albeit tension ridden, while playing down the role of identified individuals and overarching explanations of purpose.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Social Anthropology, University of Oslo, Blindern, Postboks 1091, 0317, Oslo, Norway, j.k.buer@sai.uio.no.

ABSTRACT
The article outlines a history of the concept of "disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs" or DMARDs--from the emergence in the 1970s of the idea of drugs with decisive long-term effects on bone erosion in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), through the consolidation and popularisation in the term DMARD in 1980s and 1990s. It then examines the usage of the terms "remission-inducing drugs" (RIDs) and "slow-acting anti-rheumatic drugs" (SAARDs), which for some years offered competition to the term DMARDs, thus underscoring the contingency of the establishment of DMARD as a word. Finally, it juxtaposes the apparently spontaneous emergence of the three terms DMARD, SAARD and RID, and the disappearance of the latter two, with a failed attempt in the early 1990s to replace these terms with the new term "disease-controlling antirheumatic treatment" (DC-ART). The analysis highlights the paradoxical qualities of the DMARD concept as robust albeit tension ridden, while playing down the role of identified individuals and overarching explanations of purpose.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

This passage from Paulus’ (1982) article is the earliest use of the initialism DMARD that I documented. Typically for initialisms, the term follows in parenthesis after the full phrase. With permission from Paulus, Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, BMJ Publishing Group Ltd
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Fig2: This passage from Paulus’ (1982) article is the earliest use of the initialism DMARD that I documented. Typically for initialisms, the term follows in parenthesis after the full phrase. With permission from Paulus, Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, BMJ Publishing Group Ltd

Mentions: A closer examination reveals that at approximately that time, barely preceding the sharp rise in frequency observed from 1982 on, the concept underwent two interconnected transformations which resulted in a cementation of the term: first, the idea of disease-modifying drugs ceased to be expressed in varying descriptive phrases open to reformulation and became fixed as formula, the concept-phrase “disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs”. Second, this fixed concept-phrase engendered an initialism: “DMARD”. Both transformations are tangible in the juxtaposition of the article “An overview of benefit/risk of disease-modifying treatment of rheumatoid arthritis as of today” (Paulus 1982), which is the earliest appearance of the initialism DMARD that I have documented, and the review “Recent developments in disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs” (Hunneyball 1980) published only 2 years earlier. In Hunneyball’s text, from 1980 the phrase that he employed to refer to the category still seemed malleable: while he used the phrase “disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs” in the title, he used the phrase “non-steroidal disease-modifying drugs” in the body text.3 Contrasting this dynamic play of semantics in Paulus text, published 2 years later, the phrase appears as fixed in the shape it retains today. It was from this fixed phrase that the initialism DMARD spun. Yet, among the numerous initialisms in Hunneyball’s text, the initialism DMARD did not figure; the malleability which the phrase of origin still retained did not allow for that. In Paulus text, by contrast, the initialism DMARD is aptly used in replacement of the full phrase (see Fig. 2).Fig. 2


A history of the term "DMARD".

Buer JK - Inflammopharmacology (2015)

This passage from Paulus’ (1982) article is the earliest use of the initialism DMARD that I documented. Typically for initialisms, the term follows in parenthesis after the full phrase. With permission from Paulus, Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, BMJ Publishing Group Ltd
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508364&req=5

Fig2: This passage from Paulus’ (1982) article is the earliest use of the initialism DMARD that I documented. Typically for initialisms, the term follows in parenthesis after the full phrase. With permission from Paulus, Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, BMJ Publishing Group Ltd
Mentions: A closer examination reveals that at approximately that time, barely preceding the sharp rise in frequency observed from 1982 on, the concept underwent two interconnected transformations which resulted in a cementation of the term: first, the idea of disease-modifying drugs ceased to be expressed in varying descriptive phrases open to reformulation and became fixed as formula, the concept-phrase “disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs”. Second, this fixed concept-phrase engendered an initialism: “DMARD”. Both transformations are tangible in the juxtaposition of the article “An overview of benefit/risk of disease-modifying treatment of rheumatoid arthritis as of today” (Paulus 1982), which is the earliest appearance of the initialism DMARD that I have documented, and the review “Recent developments in disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs” (Hunneyball 1980) published only 2 years earlier. In Hunneyball’s text, from 1980 the phrase that he employed to refer to the category still seemed malleable: while he used the phrase “disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs” in the title, he used the phrase “non-steroidal disease-modifying drugs” in the body text.3 Contrasting this dynamic play of semantics in Paulus text, published 2 years later, the phrase appears as fixed in the shape it retains today. It was from this fixed phrase that the initialism DMARD spun. Yet, among the numerous initialisms in Hunneyball’s text, the initialism DMARD did not figure; the malleability which the phrase of origin still retained did not allow for that. In Paulus text, by contrast, the initialism DMARD is aptly used in replacement of the full phrase (see Fig. 2).Fig. 2

Bottom Line: It then examines the usage of the terms "remission-inducing drugs" (RIDs) and "slow-acting anti-rheumatic drugs" (SAARDs), which for some years offered competition to the term DMARDs, thus underscoring the contingency of the establishment of DMARD as a word.Finally, it juxtaposes the apparently spontaneous emergence of the three terms DMARD, SAARD and RID, and the disappearance of the latter two, with a failed attempt in the early 1990s to replace these terms with the new term "disease-controlling antirheumatic treatment" (DC-ART).The analysis highlights the paradoxical qualities of the DMARD concept as robust albeit tension ridden, while playing down the role of identified individuals and overarching explanations of purpose.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Social Anthropology, University of Oslo, Blindern, Postboks 1091, 0317, Oslo, Norway, j.k.buer@sai.uio.no.

ABSTRACT
The article outlines a history of the concept of "disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs" or DMARDs--from the emergence in the 1970s of the idea of drugs with decisive long-term effects on bone erosion in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), through the consolidation and popularisation in the term DMARD in 1980s and 1990s. It then examines the usage of the terms "remission-inducing drugs" (RIDs) and "slow-acting anti-rheumatic drugs" (SAARDs), which for some years offered competition to the term DMARDs, thus underscoring the contingency of the establishment of DMARD as a word. Finally, it juxtaposes the apparently spontaneous emergence of the three terms DMARD, SAARD and RID, and the disappearance of the latter two, with a failed attempt in the early 1990s to replace these terms with the new term "disease-controlling antirheumatic treatment" (DC-ART). The analysis highlights the paradoxical qualities of the DMARD concept as robust albeit tension ridden, while playing down the role of identified individuals and overarching explanations of purpose.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus