Limits...
New Directions in Chronic Disease Management.

Kim HS, Cho JH, Yoon KH - Endocrinol Metab (Seoul) (2015)

Bottom Line: Current healthcare systems fail to provide an appropriate quality of care to prevent the development of chronic complications without additional healthcare costs.However, for various reasons, these advantages have not translated effectively into real clinical practice.We also discuss limitations and future directions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Informatics; Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
A worldwide epidemic of chronic disease, and complications thereof, is underway, with no sign of abatement. Healthcare costs have increased tremendously, principally because of the need to treat chronic complications of non-communicable diseases including cardiovascular disease, blindness, end-stage renal disease, and amputation of extremities. Current healthcare systems fail to provide an appropriate quality of care to prevent the development of chronic complications without additional healthcare costs. A new paradigm for prevention and treatment of chronic disease and the complications thereof is urgently required. Several clinical studies have clearly shown that frequent communication between physicians and patients, based on electronic data transmission from medical devices, greatly assists in the management of chronic disease. However, for various reasons, these advantages have not translated effectively into real clinical practice. In the present review, we describe current relevant studies, and trends in the use of information technology for chronic disease management. We also discuss limitations and future directions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Scheme of the ubiquitous healthcare system.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508259&req=5

Figure 1: Scheme of the ubiquitous healthcare system.

Mentions: Medical care needs to change from uni- to bi-directional. Developments in information technology (IT) and the development of many new medical devices have encouraged recent research projects on healthcare communication [252627282930]. U-healthcare combines IT and medicine, allows contact anytime with health management and medical services, and is being introduced both domestically and internationally (primarily targeting diabetics) [31323334353637]. Patients with chronic diseases, such as diabetes or hypertension, are still required to visit medical professionals every 3 to 4 months, but U-healthcare aids in management between hospital visits. Via a mobile phone or the Internet, patient places personal information (blood sugar level, drug use, and hypoglycemic status) onto a server, and the data are then delivered to a U-healthcare center. A medical team next reads and analyzes the information, and a medical team member responds if a problem is apparent (Fig. 1) [35363738]. Many patients have already expressed the desire to participate in U-healthcare [35], and an Internet-based glucose monitoring (IBGM) system has been developed. In one study, a significant decrease in the level of HbA1c was evident in diabetic patients who used the system for 3 months; indeed, those with higher baseline HbA1c levels benefitted particularly [39]. Furthermore, a 3-month trial yielded benefits that lasted for up to 30 months [40]. Thus, IBGM not only reduced HbA1c levels but caused such levels to become stabilized. It appears that the program motivated patients to manage blood sugar levels continuously. Thus, U-healthcare was successful. Similar results have been obtained in other studies [25262728293031323334353637383940].


New Directions in Chronic Disease Management.

Kim HS, Cho JH, Yoon KH - Endocrinol Metab (Seoul) (2015)

Scheme of the ubiquitous healthcare system.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508259&req=5

Figure 1: Scheme of the ubiquitous healthcare system.
Mentions: Medical care needs to change from uni- to bi-directional. Developments in information technology (IT) and the development of many new medical devices have encouraged recent research projects on healthcare communication [252627282930]. U-healthcare combines IT and medicine, allows contact anytime with health management and medical services, and is being introduced both domestically and internationally (primarily targeting diabetics) [31323334353637]. Patients with chronic diseases, such as diabetes or hypertension, are still required to visit medical professionals every 3 to 4 months, but U-healthcare aids in management between hospital visits. Via a mobile phone or the Internet, patient places personal information (blood sugar level, drug use, and hypoglycemic status) onto a server, and the data are then delivered to a U-healthcare center. A medical team next reads and analyzes the information, and a medical team member responds if a problem is apparent (Fig. 1) [35363738]. Many patients have already expressed the desire to participate in U-healthcare [35], and an Internet-based glucose monitoring (IBGM) system has been developed. In one study, a significant decrease in the level of HbA1c was evident in diabetic patients who used the system for 3 months; indeed, those with higher baseline HbA1c levels benefitted particularly [39]. Furthermore, a 3-month trial yielded benefits that lasted for up to 30 months [40]. Thus, IBGM not only reduced HbA1c levels but caused such levels to become stabilized. It appears that the program motivated patients to manage blood sugar levels continuously. Thus, U-healthcare was successful. Similar results have been obtained in other studies [25262728293031323334353637383940].

Bottom Line: Current healthcare systems fail to provide an appropriate quality of care to prevent the development of chronic complications without additional healthcare costs.However, for various reasons, these advantages have not translated effectively into real clinical practice.We also discuss limitations and future directions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Informatics; Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
A worldwide epidemic of chronic disease, and complications thereof, is underway, with no sign of abatement. Healthcare costs have increased tremendously, principally because of the need to treat chronic complications of non-communicable diseases including cardiovascular disease, blindness, end-stage renal disease, and amputation of extremities. Current healthcare systems fail to provide an appropriate quality of care to prevent the development of chronic complications without additional healthcare costs. A new paradigm for prevention and treatment of chronic disease and the complications thereof is urgently required. Several clinical studies have clearly shown that frequent communication between physicians and patients, based on electronic data transmission from medical devices, greatly assists in the management of chronic disease. However, for various reasons, these advantages have not translated effectively into real clinical practice. In the present review, we describe current relevant studies, and trends in the use of information technology for chronic disease management. We also discuss limitations and future directions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus