Limits...
Renal telocytes contribute to the repair of ischemically injured renal tubules.

Li L, Lin M, Li L, Wang R, Zhang C, Qi G, Xu M, Rong R, Zhu T - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2014)

Bottom Line: However, their precise function in organ regeneration remains unknown.The results of histological injury assessments and the expression levels of cleaved caspase-3 were consistent with a change in kidney function.Our data suggest that the protective effect of TCs against IRI occurs via inflammation-independent mechanisms in vivo.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Fudan University Zhongshan Hospital, Shanghai, China; Shanghai Key Lab of Organ Transplantation, Shanghai, China.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Tracking of renal telocytes (TCs) following renal ischaemia–reperfusion injury. Three days after infection, ∽75.9% of the TCs were GFP positive (A). Confocal microscopy revealed that GFP-TCs were present in the kidneys (B) and the lungs (C). However, no TCs were detected in the liver (D), the spleen (E) or the intestine (F).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508154&req=5

fig02: Tracking of renal telocytes (TCs) following renal ischaemia–reperfusion injury. Three days after infection, ∽75.9% of the TCs were GFP positive (A). Confocal microscopy revealed that GFP-TCs were present in the kidneys (B) and the lungs (C). However, no TCs were detected in the liver (D), the spleen (E) or the intestine (F).

Mentions: To further evaluate the renal delivery of intravenously infused TCs, we generated GFP-TCs. The FACS results revealed that ∽75.9% of the TCs were GFP-positive (Fig.2A). Frozen sections showed GFP expression in both the kidney and the lungs following the injection of GFP-TCs (Fig.2B and C). The TCs in the kidney displayed piriform/spindle/triangular cell bodies that primarily congregated around the vessel. The number of TCs in the kidney was slightly lower than in the lungs. Moreover, there were almost no TCs found in the liver, the spleen or the intestine (Fig.2D–F).


Renal telocytes contribute to the repair of ischemically injured renal tubules.

Li L, Lin M, Li L, Wang R, Zhang C, Qi G, Xu M, Rong R, Zhu T - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2014)

Tracking of renal telocytes (TCs) following renal ischaemia–reperfusion injury. Three days after infection, ∽75.9% of the TCs were GFP positive (A). Confocal microscopy revealed that GFP-TCs were present in the kidneys (B) and the lungs (C). However, no TCs were detected in the liver (D), the spleen (E) or the intestine (F).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508154&req=5

fig02: Tracking of renal telocytes (TCs) following renal ischaemia–reperfusion injury. Three days after infection, ∽75.9% of the TCs were GFP positive (A). Confocal microscopy revealed that GFP-TCs were present in the kidneys (B) and the lungs (C). However, no TCs were detected in the liver (D), the spleen (E) or the intestine (F).
Mentions: To further evaluate the renal delivery of intravenously infused TCs, we generated GFP-TCs. The FACS results revealed that ∽75.9% of the TCs were GFP-positive (Fig.2A). Frozen sections showed GFP expression in both the kidney and the lungs following the injection of GFP-TCs (Fig.2B and C). The TCs in the kidney displayed piriform/spindle/triangular cell bodies that primarily congregated around the vessel. The number of TCs in the kidney was slightly lower than in the lungs. Moreover, there were almost no TCs found in the liver, the spleen or the intestine (Fig.2D–F).

Bottom Line: However, their precise function in organ regeneration remains unknown.The results of histological injury assessments and the expression levels of cleaved caspase-3 were consistent with a change in kidney function.Our data suggest that the protective effect of TCs against IRI occurs via inflammation-independent mechanisms in vivo.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Fudan University Zhongshan Hospital, Shanghai, China; Shanghai Key Lab of Organ Transplantation, Shanghai, China.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus