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Renal telocytes contribute to the repair of ischemically injured renal tubules.

Li L, Lin M, Li L, Wang R, Zhang C, Qi G, Xu M, Rong R, Zhu T - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2014)

Bottom Line: In a renal IRI model, transplantation of renal TCs was found to decrease serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels, while renal fibroblasts exerted no such effect.Our data suggest that the protective effect of TCs against IRI occurs via inflammation-independent mechanisms in vivo.TCs did not display any advantage in paracrine growth factor secretion in vitro compared with renal fibroblasts.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Fudan University Zhongshan Hospital, Shanghai, China; Shanghai Key Lab of Organ Transplantation, Shanghai, China.

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Purity of the isolated renal telocytes (TCs). Phase-contrast microscopy of kidney TCs in primary culture (A). Note the typical, very long telopodes (more than 40 μm). The unique structure of the telopodes is also apparent, consisting of alternating dilations (podoms) and thin segments (podomers). Direct magnification: 400 × . Double immunofluorescence staining against CD117 and CD34 combined with cell counting revealed that ∽95.5 ± 0.01% of the cells were c-kit-positive (B), while ∽97.5 ± 0.02% were CD34-positive (C), and ∽93.5 ± 0.05% were both c-kit- and CD34-positive (D). B: Anti-CD117 (green); C: anti-CD34 (red); D: merged images of CD117, CD34 and DAPI staining. (E) Quantification of cells that were positive for CD117, CD34, and both CD117 and CD34 (n = 5).
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fig01: Purity of the isolated renal telocytes (TCs). Phase-contrast microscopy of kidney TCs in primary culture (A). Note the typical, very long telopodes (more than 40 μm). The unique structure of the telopodes is also apparent, consisting of alternating dilations (podoms) and thin segments (podomers). Direct magnification: 400 × . Double immunofluorescence staining against CD117 and CD34 combined with cell counting revealed that ∽95.5 ± 0.01% of the cells were c-kit-positive (B), while ∽97.5 ± 0.02% were CD34-positive (C), and ∽93.5 ± 0.05% were both c-kit- and CD34-positive (D). B: Anti-CD117 (green); C: anti-CD34 (red); D: merged images of CD117, CD34 and DAPI staining. (E) Quantification of cells that were positive for CD117, CD34, and both CD117 and CD34 (n = 5).

Mentions: Based on phase-contrast microscopy, the primary culture of isolated CD117+ renal TCs displayed renal TCs with piriform/spindle/triangular cell bodies containing long, slender Tps, showing an alternation of thick segments (podoms) and thin segments (podomers; Fig.1A). The renal TCs with this unique morphology were positive for both CD117 and CD34 (Fig.1B–D). The purity of the isolated renal TCs was determined based on double immunofluorescence staining of CD117 and CD34. Approximately 95.50 ± 1.76% of the total cells were CD117-positive, while approximately 97.25 ± 2.33% were CD34-positive and ∽93.38 ± 3.11% were both CD117- and CD34-positive (Fig.1E and Table2).


Renal telocytes contribute to the repair of ischemically injured renal tubules.

Li L, Lin M, Li L, Wang R, Zhang C, Qi G, Xu M, Rong R, Zhu T - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2014)

Purity of the isolated renal telocytes (TCs). Phase-contrast microscopy of kidney TCs in primary culture (A). Note the typical, very long telopodes (more than 40 μm). The unique structure of the telopodes is also apparent, consisting of alternating dilations (podoms) and thin segments (podomers). Direct magnification: 400 × . Double immunofluorescence staining against CD117 and CD34 combined with cell counting revealed that ∽95.5 ± 0.01% of the cells were c-kit-positive (B), while ∽97.5 ± 0.02% were CD34-positive (C), and ∽93.5 ± 0.05% were both c-kit- and CD34-positive (D). B: Anti-CD117 (green); C: anti-CD34 (red); D: merged images of CD117, CD34 and DAPI staining. (E) Quantification of cells that were positive for CD117, CD34, and both CD117 and CD34 (n = 5).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508154&req=5

fig01: Purity of the isolated renal telocytes (TCs). Phase-contrast microscopy of kidney TCs in primary culture (A). Note the typical, very long telopodes (more than 40 μm). The unique structure of the telopodes is also apparent, consisting of alternating dilations (podoms) and thin segments (podomers). Direct magnification: 400 × . Double immunofluorescence staining against CD117 and CD34 combined with cell counting revealed that ∽95.5 ± 0.01% of the cells were c-kit-positive (B), while ∽97.5 ± 0.02% were CD34-positive (C), and ∽93.5 ± 0.05% were both c-kit- and CD34-positive (D). B: Anti-CD117 (green); C: anti-CD34 (red); D: merged images of CD117, CD34 and DAPI staining. (E) Quantification of cells that were positive for CD117, CD34, and both CD117 and CD34 (n = 5).
Mentions: Based on phase-contrast microscopy, the primary culture of isolated CD117+ renal TCs displayed renal TCs with piriform/spindle/triangular cell bodies containing long, slender Tps, showing an alternation of thick segments (podoms) and thin segments (podomers; Fig.1A). The renal TCs with this unique morphology were positive for both CD117 and CD34 (Fig.1B–D). The purity of the isolated renal TCs was determined based on double immunofluorescence staining of CD117 and CD34. Approximately 95.50 ± 1.76% of the total cells were CD117-positive, while approximately 97.25 ± 2.33% were CD34-positive and ∽93.38 ± 3.11% were both CD117- and CD34-positive (Fig.1E and Table2).

Bottom Line: In a renal IRI model, transplantation of renal TCs was found to decrease serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels, while renal fibroblasts exerted no such effect.Our data suggest that the protective effect of TCs against IRI occurs via inflammation-independent mechanisms in vivo.TCs did not display any advantage in paracrine growth factor secretion in vitro compared with renal fibroblasts.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Fudan University Zhongshan Hospital, Shanghai, China; Shanghai Key Lab of Organ Transplantation, Shanghai, China.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus