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Excess caffeine exposure impairs eye development during chick embryogenesis.

Ma ZL, Wang G, Cheng X, Chuai M, Kurihara H, Lee KK, Yang X - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2014)

Bottom Line: It is now known that over consumption of caffeine has detrimental effects on our health, and also disrupts normal foetal development in pregnant mothers.Thirdly, we found that reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was significantly increased in eye tissues following caffeine treatment, and that the addition of anti-oxidant vitamin C could rescue the eyes from developing abnormally in the presence of caffeine.It causes asymmetrical microphthalmia to develop by increasing ROS production and perturbs Pax6 expression.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Histology & Embryology, Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine of the Ministry of Education, Institute of Fetal-Preterm Labor Medicine, Medical College of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China.

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Caffeine exposure increased oxidative stress in the developing eyes. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and MDA & SOD activities were determined in the 9-day chick embryonic eyes following caffeine exposure. (A) Schematic chart showing the acquisition of eye tissue from 9-day-old chick embryos for analysis. (B) Bar charts showing caffeine (15 μmol/egg) significantly increased ROS production as compared with the control. (C and D) Caffeine (15 μmol/egg) also significantly increased MDA & SOD activities (**P < 0.01).
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fig05: Caffeine exposure increased oxidative stress in the developing eyes. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and MDA & SOD activities were determined in the 9-day chick embryonic eyes following caffeine exposure. (A) Schematic chart showing the acquisition of eye tissue from 9-day-old chick embryos for analysis. (B) Bar charts showing caffeine (15 μmol/egg) significantly increased ROS production as compared with the control. (C and D) Caffeine (15 μmol/egg) also significantly increased MDA & SOD activities (**P < 0.01).

Mentions: It has been reported that caffeine could directly elevate intracellular oxidation stress [23,24]. Therefore, we investigated the level of ROS production and anti-oxidation ability in the context of the caffeine-treated eye, as shown schematically in Figure5A. Our results showed that ROS generation was significantly increased in 9-day chick embryo eye tissues after the 15 μmol/egg caffeine treatment (Fig.5B; Control = 23.90 ± 5.78 μ/s mg, caffeine-treated group = 43.94 ± 3.50 μ/s mg, N = 8; P < 0.01). Assay for MDA revealed that there was an increase for the caffeine-treated groups (Fig.5C; Control = 1.07 ± 0.16 nmol/mgprot, caffeine-treated group = 2.18 ± 0.70 nmol/mgprot, N = 8; P < 0.01). Similar result was observed for SOD activity, which is an anti-oxidation indicator (Fig.5D; Control = 5.16 ± 1.26 U/mgprot, caffeine = 13.78 ± 2.64 U/mgprot, N = 8; P < 0.01). All these data indicate that ROS accumulation correlates with caffeine-induced eye dysplasia.


Excess caffeine exposure impairs eye development during chick embryogenesis.

Ma ZL, Wang G, Cheng X, Chuai M, Kurihara H, Lee KK, Yang X - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2014)

Caffeine exposure increased oxidative stress in the developing eyes. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and MDA & SOD activities were determined in the 9-day chick embryonic eyes following caffeine exposure. (A) Schematic chart showing the acquisition of eye tissue from 9-day-old chick embryos for analysis. (B) Bar charts showing caffeine (15 μmol/egg) significantly increased ROS production as compared with the control. (C and D) Caffeine (15 μmol/egg) also significantly increased MDA & SOD activities (**P < 0.01).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508153&req=5

fig05: Caffeine exposure increased oxidative stress in the developing eyes. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and MDA & SOD activities were determined in the 9-day chick embryonic eyes following caffeine exposure. (A) Schematic chart showing the acquisition of eye tissue from 9-day-old chick embryos for analysis. (B) Bar charts showing caffeine (15 μmol/egg) significantly increased ROS production as compared with the control. (C and D) Caffeine (15 μmol/egg) also significantly increased MDA & SOD activities (**P < 0.01).
Mentions: It has been reported that caffeine could directly elevate intracellular oxidation stress [23,24]. Therefore, we investigated the level of ROS production and anti-oxidation ability in the context of the caffeine-treated eye, as shown schematically in Figure5A. Our results showed that ROS generation was significantly increased in 9-day chick embryo eye tissues after the 15 μmol/egg caffeine treatment (Fig.5B; Control = 23.90 ± 5.78 μ/s mg, caffeine-treated group = 43.94 ± 3.50 μ/s mg, N = 8; P < 0.01). Assay for MDA revealed that there was an increase for the caffeine-treated groups (Fig.5C; Control = 1.07 ± 0.16 nmol/mgprot, caffeine-treated group = 2.18 ± 0.70 nmol/mgprot, N = 8; P < 0.01). Similar result was observed for SOD activity, which is an anti-oxidation indicator (Fig.5D; Control = 5.16 ± 1.26 U/mgprot, caffeine = 13.78 ± 2.64 U/mgprot, N = 8; P < 0.01). All these data indicate that ROS accumulation correlates with caffeine-induced eye dysplasia.

Bottom Line: It is now known that over consumption of caffeine has detrimental effects on our health, and also disrupts normal foetal development in pregnant mothers.Thirdly, we found that reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was significantly increased in eye tissues following caffeine treatment, and that the addition of anti-oxidant vitamin C could rescue the eyes from developing abnormally in the presence of caffeine.It causes asymmetrical microphthalmia to develop by increasing ROS production and perturbs Pax6 expression.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Histology & Embryology, Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine of the Ministry of Education, Institute of Fetal-Preterm Labor Medicine, Medical College of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus