Limits...
Habitat and Burrow System Characteristics of the Blind Mole Rat Spalax galili in an Area of Supposed Sympatric Speciation.

Lövy M, Šklíba J, Hrouzková E, Dvořáková V, Nevo E, Šumbera R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We also mapped nine complete mole rat burrow systems to compare burrowing patterns between the soil types.Basaltic soil had a higher food supply and was harder than rendzina even under higher moisture content and lower bulk density.A combination of food supply and soil parameters probably influences burrowing patterns resulting in shorter and more complex burrow systems in basaltic soil.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, University of South Bohemia, České Budějovice, Czech Republic.

ABSTRACT
A costly search for food in subterranean rodents resulted in various adaptations improving their foraging success under given ecological conditions. In Spalax ehrenbergi superspecies, adaptations to local ecological conditions can promote speciation, which was recently supposed to occur even in sympatry at sites where two soil types of contrasting characteristics abut each other. Quantitative description of ecological conditions in such a site has been, nevertheless, missing. We measured characteristics of food supply and soil within 16 home ranges of blind mole rats Spalax galili in an area subdivided into two parts formed by basaltic soil and pale rendzina. We also mapped nine complete mole rat burrow systems to compare burrowing patterns between the soil types. Basaltic soil had a higher food supply and was harder than rendzina even under higher moisture content and lower bulk density. Population density of mole rats was five-times lower in rendzina, possibly due to the lower food supply and higher cover of Sarcopoterium shrubs which seem to be avoided by mole rats. A combination of food supply and soil parameters probably influences burrowing patterns resulting in shorter and more complex burrow systems in basaltic soil.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Burrow systems of Spalax galili in basaltic soil.Each triad of male burrow systems (M379, M737, M843) and female burrow systems (F460, F367, F796) is depicted in the real spatial configuration. Red lines represent tunnels backfilled at a time of mapping, dash lines are most probable connections not found. Green circles encompass nest sites.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508111&req=5

pone.0133157.g003: Burrow systems of Spalax galili in basaltic soil.Each triad of male burrow systems (M379, M737, M843) and female burrow systems (F460, F367, F796) is depicted in the real spatial configuration. Red lines represent tunnels backfilled at a time of mapping, dash lines are most probable connections not found. Green circles encompass nest sites.

Mentions: For both soils combined, burrow systems of S. galili comprised 119±72 (46–275) m of tunnels covering an area of 647±929 (64–3023) m2 (MCP). They consisted of a main axial tunnel, lateral branches, nest chambers, and food stores (Table 2, Figs 2 and 3). Burrow systems were relatively shallow (usually 11–21 cm, Table 2), with the nests or blind tunnels close to the nests being the deepest parts. In five burrow systems (two from rendzina, three from basaltic soil), deep blind tunnels (>60 cm) were found near the nests. Detected backfilled tunnels comprised only 2.4±3.5 (0.3–11.3) % of the burrow systems but high soil moisture complicated their detection.


Habitat and Burrow System Characteristics of the Blind Mole Rat Spalax galili in an Area of Supposed Sympatric Speciation.

Lövy M, Šklíba J, Hrouzková E, Dvořáková V, Nevo E, Šumbera R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Burrow systems of Spalax galili in basaltic soil.Each triad of male burrow systems (M379, M737, M843) and female burrow systems (F460, F367, F796) is depicted in the real spatial configuration. Red lines represent tunnels backfilled at a time of mapping, dash lines are most probable connections not found. Green circles encompass nest sites.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508111&req=5

pone.0133157.g003: Burrow systems of Spalax galili in basaltic soil.Each triad of male burrow systems (M379, M737, M843) and female burrow systems (F460, F367, F796) is depicted in the real spatial configuration. Red lines represent tunnels backfilled at a time of mapping, dash lines are most probable connections not found. Green circles encompass nest sites.
Mentions: For both soils combined, burrow systems of S. galili comprised 119±72 (46–275) m of tunnels covering an area of 647±929 (64–3023) m2 (MCP). They consisted of a main axial tunnel, lateral branches, nest chambers, and food stores (Table 2, Figs 2 and 3). Burrow systems were relatively shallow (usually 11–21 cm, Table 2), with the nests or blind tunnels close to the nests being the deepest parts. In five burrow systems (two from rendzina, three from basaltic soil), deep blind tunnels (>60 cm) were found near the nests. Detected backfilled tunnels comprised only 2.4±3.5 (0.3–11.3) % of the burrow systems but high soil moisture complicated their detection.

Bottom Line: We also mapped nine complete mole rat burrow systems to compare burrowing patterns between the soil types.Basaltic soil had a higher food supply and was harder than rendzina even under higher moisture content and lower bulk density.A combination of food supply and soil parameters probably influences burrowing patterns resulting in shorter and more complex burrow systems in basaltic soil.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, University of South Bohemia, České Budějovice, Czech Republic.

ABSTRACT
A costly search for food in subterranean rodents resulted in various adaptations improving their foraging success under given ecological conditions. In Spalax ehrenbergi superspecies, adaptations to local ecological conditions can promote speciation, which was recently supposed to occur even in sympatry at sites where two soil types of contrasting characteristics abut each other. Quantitative description of ecological conditions in such a site has been, nevertheless, missing. We measured characteristics of food supply and soil within 16 home ranges of blind mole rats Spalax galili in an area subdivided into two parts formed by basaltic soil and pale rendzina. We also mapped nine complete mole rat burrow systems to compare burrowing patterns between the soil types. Basaltic soil had a higher food supply and was harder than rendzina even under higher moisture content and lower bulk density. Population density of mole rats was five-times lower in rendzina, possibly due to the lower food supply and higher cover of Sarcopoterium shrubs which seem to be avoided by mole rats. A combination of food supply and soil parameters probably influences burrowing patterns resulting in shorter and more complex burrow systems in basaltic soil.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus