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A Cross-Sectional Study of Prisoners in Mexico City Comparing Prevalence of Transmissible Infections and Chronic Diseases with That in the General Population.

Bautista-Arredondo S, González A, Servan-Mori E, Beynon F, Juarez-Figueroa L, Conde-Glez CJ, Gras N, Sierra-Madero J, Lopez-Ridaura R, Volkow P, Bertozzi SM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: High levels of non-sterile tattooing, physical abuse and histories of sexual violence were found.Individual participants benefited from earlier diagnosis, treatment and support.The data collected will also enable the formulation of improved policy for this vulnerable group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Mexico.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To describe patterns of transmissible infections, chronic illnesses, socio-demographic characteristics and risk behaviors in Mexico City prisons, including in comparison to the general population, to identify those currently needing healthcare and inform policy.

Materials and methods: A cross-sectional study among 17,000 prisoners at 4 Mexico City prisons (June to December 2010). Participation was voluntary, confidential and based on informed consent. Participants were tested for HIV, Hepatitis B & C, syphilis, hypertension, obesity, and, if at risk, glucose and cholesterol. A subset completed a questionnaire on socio-demographic characteristics and risk behaviors. Positive results were delivered with counseling and treatment or referral.

Results: 76.8% (15,517/20,196) of men and 92.9% (1,779/1,914) of women participated. Complete data sets were available for 98.8%. The following prevalence data were established for transmissible infections: HIV 0.7%; syphilis: Anti-TP+/VDRL+ 2.0%; Hepatitis B: HBcAb 2.8%, HBsAg 0.15%; Anti-HCV 3.2%. Obesity: 9.5% men, 33.8% women. Compared with national age- and sex-matched data, the relative prevalence was greater for HIV and syphilis among women, HIV and Hepatitis C in men, and all infections in younger participants. Obesity prevalence was similar for women and lower among male participants. The prevalence of previously diagnosed diabetes and hypertension was lower. Questionnaire data (1,934 men, 520 women) demonstrated lower educational levels, increased smoking and substance use compared to national data. High levels of non-sterile tattooing, physical abuse and histories of sexual violence were found.

Conclusion: The study identified that health screening is acceptable to Mexico City prisoners and feasible on a large-scale. It demonstrated higher prevalence of HIV and other infections compared to national data, though low rates compared to international data. Individual participants benefited from earlier diagnosis, treatment and support. The data collected will also enable the formulation of improved policy for this vulnerable group.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Prevalence of previously diagnosed diabetes and high blood presure in Mexican prisoners and general population.
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pone.0131718.g002: Prevalence of previously diagnosed diabetes and high blood presure in Mexican prisoners and general population.

Mentions: In order to compare the prevalence data found in the study with a national data subsample we estimated age-adjusted Logit regressions to estimate odds ratios. With the exception of HBV, prison populations had significant higher odds to have a transmissible infection than the general population (Table 1). The odds are particularly high for HCV with the prison population being 6 times more likely to be infected than the general population, however the odds are also higher in the case of syphilis and HIV. The prevalence of obesity was similar between female participants and their national counterparts, but lower among men in the prisons compared with the men in the general population (Fig 1). Previous diagnoses of hypertension and diabetes increased with age, and were lower than the general population, though this varied with age and sex (Fig 2).


A Cross-Sectional Study of Prisoners in Mexico City Comparing Prevalence of Transmissible Infections and Chronic Diseases with That in the General Population.

Bautista-Arredondo S, González A, Servan-Mori E, Beynon F, Juarez-Figueroa L, Conde-Glez CJ, Gras N, Sierra-Madero J, Lopez-Ridaura R, Volkow P, Bertozzi SM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Prevalence of previously diagnosed diabetes and high blood presure in Mexican prisoners and general population.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508056&req=5

pone.0131718.g002: Prevalence of previously diagnosed diabetes and high blood presure in Mexican prisoners and general population.
Mentions: In order to compare the prevalence data found in the study with a national data subsample we estimated age-adjusted Logit regressions to estimate odds ratios. With the exception of HBV, prison populations had significant higher odds to have a transmissible infection than the general population (Table 1). The odds are particularly high for HCV with the prison population being 6 times more likely to be infected than the general population, however the odds are also higher in the case of syphilis and HIV. The prevalence of obesity was similar between female participants and their national counterparts, but lower among men in the prisons compared with the men in the general population (Fig 1). Previous diagnoses of hypertension and diabetes increased with age, and were lower than the general population, though this varied with age and sex (Fig 2).

Bottom Line: High levels of non-sterile tattooing, physical abuse and histories of sexual violence were found.Individual participants benefited from earlier diagnosis, treatment and support.The data collected will also enable the formulation of improved policy for this vulnerable group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Mexico.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To describe patterns of transmissible infections, chronic illnesses, socio-demographic characteristics and risk behaviors in Mexico City prisons, including in comparison to the general population, to identify those currently needing healthcare and inform policy.

Materials and methods: A cross-sectional study among 17,000 prisoners at 4 Mexico City prisons (June to December 2010). Participation was voluntary, confidential and based on informed consent. Participants were tested for HIV, Hepatitis B & C, syphilis, hypertension, obesity, and, if at risk, glucose and cholesterol. A subset completed a questionnaire on socio-demographic characteristics and risk behaviors. Positive results were delivered with counseling and treatment or referral.

Results: 76.8% (15,517/20,196) of men and 92.9% (1,779/1,914) of women participated. Complete data sets were available for 98.8%. The following prevalence data were established for transmissible infections: HIV 0.7%; syphilis: Anti-TP+/VDRL+ 2.0%; Hepatitis B: HBcAb 2.8%, HBsAg 0.15%; Anti-HCV 3.2%. Obesity: 9.5% men, 33.8% women. Compared with national age- and sex-matched data, the relative prevalence was greater for HIV and syphilis among women, HIV and Hepatitis C in men, and all infections in younger participants. Obesity prevalence was similar for women and lower among male participants. The prevalence of previously diagnosed diabetes and hypertension was lower. Questionnaire data (1,934 men, 520 women) demonstrated lower educational levels, increased smoking and substance use compared to national data. High levels of non-sterile tattooing, physical abuse and histories of sexual violence were found.

Conclusion: The study identified that health screening is acceptable to Mexico City prisoners and feasible on a large-scale. It demonstrated higher prevalence of HIV and other infections compared to national data, though low rates compared to international data. Individual participants benefited from earlier diagnosis, treatment and support. The data collected will also enable the formulation of improved policy for this vulnerable group.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus