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Lighting to Make You Feel Better: Improving the Mood of Elderly People with Affective Ambiences.

Kuijsters A, Redi J, de Ruyter B, Heynderickx I - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We hypothesized that ambiences with a clearly recognizable, positive affective meaning could be used to effectively mitigate negative mood in elderly.In line with our hypothesis we found that the activating ambience was physiologically more arousing than the neutral ambience.The cozy ambience was more effective in calming anxious elderly than the neutral ambience, as reflected by both the self-reported and physiological measurements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Human Technology Interaction Group, Industrial Engineering and Innovation Science, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Current lighting technologies extend the options for changing the appearance of rooms and closed spaces, as such creating ambiences with an affective meaning. Using intelligence, these ambiences may instantly be adapted to the needs of the room's occupant(s), possibly improving their well-being. We hypothesized that ambiences with a clearly recognizable, positive affective meaning could be used to effectively mitigate negative mood in elderly. After inducing a sad mood with a short movie one group of elderly was immersed in a positive high arousing (i.e., activating) ambience, and another group in a neutral ambience. Similarly, after inducing anxiety with a short movie one group of elderly was immersed in a pleasant low arousing (i.e., cozy) ambience, and another group in a neutral ambience. We monitored the evolution of the mood of the four groups of elderly over a period of ten minutes after the mood induction, with both self-reported mood measurements (every 2 minutes) and constant measurements of the skin conductance response (SCR) and electrocardiography (ECG). In line with our hypothesis we found that the activating ambience was physiologically more arousing than the neutral ambience. The cozy ambience was more effective in calming anxious elderly than the neutral ambience, as reflected by both the self-reported and physiological measurements.

No MeSH data available.


Average change scores with the error bars reflecting the 95% CI for SCR (left) and HR (right) after the sad mood induction.The different bars represent the ambience to which participants were exposed.
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pone.0132732.g006: Average change scores with the error bars reflecting the 95% CI for SCR (left) and HR (right) after the sad mood induction.The different bars represent the ambience to which participants were exposed.

Mentions: With respect to the physiological measures (shown in Fig 6) we found significant differences between the activating and neutral ambience for both the SCR and HR measures. In line with our expectations, the SCR of the participants immersed in the activating ambience increased more compared to the SCR of the participants immersed in the neutral ambience (F(1, 31) = 4.30, p = .046, η2 = .12). Also the effect of time reached significance (F(2.4, 75.7) = 6.21 p = .002, η2 = .17); the SCR increased during the 10 minutes after mood induction for both the participants in the activating ambience and in the neutral ambience (see also Fig 6). The effect of ambience on HR was also significant (F(1, 30) = 5.72, p = .023, η2 = .16). The heart rate decelerated for the participants in the neutral ambience, however not for the participants in the activating ambience (see again Fig 6), as such indicating a higher physiological arousal in the activating ambience. No significant effects were found on the heart rate variability measurements.


Lighting to Make You Feel Better: Improving the Mood of Elderly People with Affective Ambiences.

Kuijsters A, Redi J, de Ruyter B, Heynderickx I - PLoS ONE (2015)

Average change scores with the error bars reflecting the 95% CI for SCR (left) and HR (right) after the sad mood induction.The different bars represent the ambience to which participants were exposed.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4507869&req=5

pone.0132732.g006: Average change scores with the error bars reflecting the 95% CI for SCR (left) and HR (right) after the sad mood induction.The different bars represent the ambience to which participants were exposed.
Mentions: With respect to the physiological measures (shown in Fig 6) we found significant differences between the activating and neutral ambience for both the SCR and HR measures. In line with our expectations, the SCR of the participants immersed in the activating ambience increased more compared to the SCR of the participants immersed in the neutral ambience (F(1, 31) = 4.30, p = .046, η2 = .12). Also the effect of time reached significance (F(2.4, 75.7) = 6.21 p = .002, η2 = .17); the SCR increased during the 10 minutes after mood induction for both the participants in the activating ambience and in the neutral ambience (see also Fig 6). The effect of ambience on HR was also significant (F(1, 30) = 5.72, p = .023, η2 = .16). The heart rate decelerated for the participants in the neutral ambience, however not for the participants in the activating ambience (see again Fig 6), as such indicating a higher physiological arousal in the activating ambience. No significant effects were found on the heart rate variability measurements.

Bottom Line: We hypothesized that ambiences with a clearly recognizable, positive affective meaning could be used to effectively mitigate negative mood in elderly.In line with our hypothesis we found that the activating ambience was physiologically more arousing than the neutral ambience.The cozy ambience was more effective in calming anxious elderly than the neutral ambience, as reflected by both the self-reported and physiological measurements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Human Technology Interaction Group, Industrial Engineering and Innovation Science, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Current lighting technologies extend the options for changing the appearance of rooms and closed spaces, as such creating ambiences with an affective meaning. Using intelligence, these ambiences may instantly be adapted to the needs of the room's occupant(s), possibly improving their well-being. We hypothesized that ambiences with a clearly recognizable, positive affective meaning could be used to effectively mitigate negative mood in elderly. After inducing a sad mood with a short movie one group of elderly was immersed in a positive high arousing (i.e., activating) ambience, and another group in a neutral ambience. Similarly, after inducing anxiety with a short movie one group of elderly was immersed in a pleasant low arousing (i.e., cozy) ambience, and another group in a neutral ambience. We monitored the evolution of the mood of the four groups of elderly over a period of ten minutes after the mood induction, with both self-reported mood measurements (every 2 minutes) and constant measurements of the skin conductance response (SCR) and electrocardiography (ECG). In line with our hypothesis we found that the activating ambience was physiologically more arousing than the neutral ambience. The cozy ambience was more effective in calming anxious elderly than the neutral ambience, as reflected by both the self-reported and physiological measurements.

No MeSH data available.