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Lighting to Make You Feel Better: Improving the Mood of Elderly People with Affective Ambiences.

Kuijsters A, Redi J, de Ruyter B, Heynderickx I - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We hypothesized that ambiences with a clearly recognizable, positive affective meaning could be used to effectively mitigate negative mood in elderly.In line with our hypothesis we found that the activating ambience was physiologically more arousing than the neutral ambience.The cozy ambience was more effective in calming anxious elderly than the neutral ambience, as reflected by both the self-reported and physiological measurements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Human Technology Interaction Group, Industrial Engineering and Innovation Science, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Current lighting technologies extend the options for changing the appearance of rooms and closed spaces, as such creating ambiences with an affective meaning. Using intelligence, these ambiences may instantly be adapted to the needs of the room's occupant(s), possibly improving their well-being. We hypothesized that ambiences with a clearly recognizable, positive affective meaning could be used to effectively mitigate negative mood in elderly. After inducing a sad mood with a short movie one group of elderly was immersed in a positive high arousing (i.e., activating) ambience, and another group in a neutral ambience. Similarly, after inducing anxiety with a short movie one group of elderly was immersed in a pleasant low arousing (i.e., cozy) ambience, and another group in a neutral ambience. We monitored the evolution of the mood of the four groups of elderly over a period of ten minutes after the mood induction, with both self-reported mood measurements (every 2 minutes) and constant measurements of the skin conductance response (SCR) and electrocardiography (ECG). In line with our hypothesis we found that the activating ambience was physiologically more arousing than the neutral ambience. The cozy ambience was more effective in calming anxious elderly than the neutral ambience, as reflected by both the self-reported and physiological measurements.

No MeSH data available.


An overview of the installed luminaires in the experimental room.
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pone.0132732.g002: An overview of the installed luminaires in the experimental room.

Mentions: An overview of the installed luminaires is given in Fig 2. Functional white lighting was provided by two cylindrical floor lights consisting of four fluorescent lamps each; two lamps with a warm white color temperature (CT) of 2700K (Philips Master TL5 HE 28W/827) and two lamps with a cold white of 6500K (Philips Master TL5 HE 28W/865 lamps). Additional white light was provided by six pairs of halogen spot lights; each pair consisted of one spot with a warm white CT of 3000K (Philips HR Dichroic 50W GU5.3 12V 36D) and one spot with a cool white CT of 4700K (Philips Diamondline 50W GU5.3 12V 36D 1CT). Decorative lighting was generated by three Philips Living Color lamps. Two were placed on each side of the television cabinet and one in the upper left corner. A table light consisting of red, green and blue LED strips was mounted underneath the coffee table and illuminated the floor locally. Finally, a Gemini lamp, consisting, on the one hand, of red, green and blue LEDs for illuminating the ceiling, and, on the other hand, of white LEDs for illumination downwards, was mounted above the dinner table.


Lighting to Make You Feel Better: Improving the Mood of Elderly People with Affective Ambiences.

Kuijsters A, Redi J, de Ruyter B, Heynderickx I - PLoS ONE (2015)

An overview of the installed luminaires in the experimental room.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4507869&req=5

pone.0132732.g002: An overview of the installed luminaires in the experimental room.
Mentions: An overview of the installed luminaires is given in Fig 2. Functional white lighting was provided by two cylindrical floor lights consisting of four fluorescent lamps each; two lamps with a warm white color temperature (CT) of 2700K (Philips Master TL5 HE 28W/827) and two lamps with a cold white of 6500K (Philips Master TL5 HE 28W/865 lamps). Additional white light was provided by six pairs of halogen spot lights; each pair consisted of one spot with a warm white CT of 3000K (Philips HR Dichroic 50W GU5.3 12V 36D) and one spot with a cool white CT of 4700K (Philips Diamondline 50W GU5.3 12V 36D 1CT). Decorative lighting was generated by three Philips Living Color lamps. Two were placed on each side of the television cabinet and one in the upper left corner. A table light consisting of red, green and blue LED strips was mounted underneath the coffee table and illuminated the floor locally. Finally, a Gemini lamp, consisting, on the one hand, of red, green and blue LEDs for illuminating the ceiling, and, on the other hand, of white LEDs for illumination downwards, was mounted above the dinner table.

Bottom Line: We hypothesized that ambiences with a clearly recognizable, positive affective meaning could be used to effectively mitigate negative mood in elderly.In line with our hypothesis we found that the activating ambience was physiologically more arousing than the neutral ambience.The cozy ambience was more effective in calming anxious elderly than the neutral ambience, as reflected by both the self-reported and physiological measurements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Human Technology Interaction Group, Industrial Engineering and Innovation Science, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Current lighting technologies extend the options for changing the appearance of rooms and closed spaces, as such creating ambiences with an affective meaning. Using intelligence, these ambiences may instantly be adapted to the needs of the room's occupant(s), possibly improving their well-being. We hypothesized that ambiences with a clearly recognizable, positive affective meaning could be used to effectively mitigate negative mood in elderly. After inducing a sad mood with a short movie one group of elderly was immersed in a positive high arousing (i.e., activating) ambience, and another group in a neutral ambience. Similarly, after inducing anxiety with a short movie one group of elderly was immersed in a pleasant low arousing (i.e., cozy) ambience, and another group in a neutral ambience. We monitored the evolution of the mood of the four groups of elderly over a period of ten minutes after the mood induction, with both self-reported mood measurements (every 2 minutes) and constant measurements of the skin conductance response (SCR) and electrocardiography (ECG). In line with our hypothesis we found that the activating ambience was physiologically more arousing than the neutral ambience. The cozy ambience was more effective in calming anxious elderly than the neutral ambience, as reflected by both the self-reported and physiological measurements.

No MeSH data available.