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Salivirus in Children and Its Association with Childhood Acute Gastroenteritis: A Paired Case-Control Study.

Yu JM, Ao YY, Liu N, Li LL, Duan ZJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Results showed that salivirus was detected in 16 (3.5%) and 13 (2.8%) of the case and control samples, respectively; no differences in detection rates (p=0.571) or mean values of viral loads (p=0.400) were observed between the groups.Furthermore, complete genome sequence of a salivirus recovered from the feces of a child with diarrhea (i.e., SaliV-FHB) shared a 99% nucleotide identity with the sewage strain.In conclusion, a paired case-control study did not support a causative role for salivirus strains detected in this study with pediatric gastroenteritis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Viral Diseases Control and Prevention, China CDC, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Salivirus was recently discovered in children with gastroenteritis and in sewage. Though a causative role for salivirus in childhood gastroenteritis was suggested in the previous study, the relationship between salivirus and acute gastroenteritis has not yet been clearly clarified. The sewage strain reported by Ng, although represented by incomplete genome sequencing data, was distinct from previously reported saliviruses, and had not previously been detected in humans. A case-control study examining 461 paired stool samples from children with diarrhea and healthy controls (1:1) was conducted in this study. Also, common diarrheal viruses were detected and complete genome of a salivirus was determined. Results showed that salivirus was detected in 16 (3.5%) and 13 (2.8%) of the case and control samples, respectively; no differences in detection rates (p=0.571) or mean values of viral loads (p=0.400) were observed between the groups. Multivariate Cox regression revealed no association between salivirus and gastroenteritis (p=0.774). The data also demonstrated that salivirus infection did not exacerbate clinical symptoms of gastroenteritis in children. Furthermore, complete genome sequence of a salivirus recovered from the feces of a child with diarrhea (i.e., SaliV-FHB) shared a 99% nucleotide identity with the sewage strain. In conclusion, a paired case-control study did not support a causative role for salivirus strains detected in this study with pediatric gastroenteritis. This study also demonstrated that all known saliviruses can be detected in the feces of children with or without gastroenteritis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Phylogenetic relationships based on the 5′ UTR sequences amplified in this study and those of other saliviruses.The sequences acquired in this study were in the same lineage. Sequences acquired from cases are marked with“●” in red, while from healthy controls are marked with “●” in black. SaliV-HFB is marked with “▲” in red.
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pone.0130977.g002: Phylogenetic relationships based on the 5′ UTR sequences amplified in this study and those of other saliviruses.The sequences acquired in this study were in the same lineage. Sequences acquired from cases are marked with“●” in red, while from healthy controls are marked with “●” in black. SaliV-HFB is marked with “▲” in red.

Mentions: Of the 29-salivirus sequences, it was found that 4 (SaliV-FHB) were close to SaliV-SewBKK, with more than 95% shared nt identities; the other 25 sequences were close to salivirus A, with shared nt identities of between 98% and 99%. Of the four SaliV-FHB-positive samples, three were from the case group and one from the control group. Phylogenetic analysis of these sequences using the neighbor-joining method and 1,000 bootstrap replications showed they were from the same lineage (Fig 2). These sequences were deposited in GenBank under the accession number of KM051477-KM051505. In addition, among the 16 salivirus-positive children with diarrhea, 10 (62.5%) were coinfected with another diarrhea-related virus, among which NoV/SaV was the most common (n = 9) (Table 1).


Salivirus in Children and Its Association with Childhood Acute Gastroenteritis: A Paired Case-Control Study.

Yu JM, Ao YY, Liu N, Li LL, Duan ZJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Phylogenetic relationships based on the 5′ UTR sequences amplified in this study and those of other saliviruses.The sequences acquired in this study were in the same lineage. Sequences acquired from cases are marked with“●” in red, while from healthy controls are marked with “●” in black. SaliV-HFB is marked with “▲” in red.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4507861&req=5

pone.0130977.g002: Phylogenetic relationships based on the 5′ UTR sequences amplified in this study and those of other saliviruses.The sequences acquired in this study were in the same lineage. Sequences acquired from cases are marked with“●” in red, while from healthy controls are marked with “●” in black. SaliV-HFB is marked with “▲” in red.
Mentions: Of the 29-salivirus sequences, it was found that 4 (SaliV-FHB) were close to SaliV-SewBKK, with more than 95% shared nt identities; the other 25 sequences were close to salivirus A, with shared nt identities of between 98% and 99%. Of the four SaliV-FHB-positive samples, three were from the case group and one from the control group. Phylogenetic analysis of these sequences using the neighbor-joining method and 1,000 bootstrap replications showed they were from the same lineage (Fig 2). These sequences were deposited in GenBank under the accession number of KM051477-KM051505. In addition, among the 16 salivirus-positive children with diarrhea, 10 (62.5%) were coinfected with another diarrhea-related virus, among which NoV/SaV was the most common (n = 9) (Table 1).

Bottom Line: Results showed that salivirus was detected in 16 (3.5%) and 13 (2.8%) of the case and control samples, respectively; no differences in detection rates (p=0.571) or mean values of viral loads (p=0.400) were observed between the groups.Furthermore, complete genome sequence of a salivirus recovered from the feces of a child with diarrhea (i.e., SaliV-FHB) shared a 99% nucleotide identity with the sewage strain.In conclusion, a paired case-control study did not support a causative role for salivirus strains detected in this study with pediatric gastroenteritis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Viral Diseases Control and Prevention, China CDC, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Salivirus was recently discovered in children with gastroenteritis and in sewage. Though a causative role for salivirus in childhood gastroenteritis was suggested in the previous study, the relationship between salivirus and acute gastroenteritis has not yet been clearly clarified. The sewage strain reported by Ng, although represented by incomplete genome sequencing data, was distinct from previously reported saliviruses, and had not previously been detected in humans. A case-control study examining 461 paired stool samples from children with diarrhea and healthy controls (1:1) was conducted in this study. Also, common diarrheal viruses were detected and complete genome of a salivirus was determined. Results showed that salivirus was detected in 16 (3.5%) and 13 (2.8%) of the case and control samples, respectively; no differences in detection rates (p=0.571) or mean values of viral loads (p=0.400) were observed between the groups. Multivariate Cox regression revealed no association between salivirus and gastroenteritis (p=0.774). The data also demonstrated that salivirus infection did not exacerbate clinical symptoms of gastroenteritis in children. Furthermore, complete genome sequence of a salivirus recovered from the feces of a child with diarrhea (i.e., SaliV-FHB) shared a 99% nucleotide identity with the sewage strain. In conclusion, a paired case-control study did not support a causative role for salivirus strains detected in this study with pediatric gastroenteritis. This study also demonstrated that all known saliviruses can be detected in the feces of children with or without gastroenteritis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus