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Salivirus in Children and Its Association with Childhood Acute Gastroenteritis: A Paired Case-Control Study.

Yu JM, Ao YY, Liu N, Li LL, Duan ZJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Results showed that salivirus was detected in 16 (3.5%) and 13 (2.8%) of the case and control samples, respectively; no differences in detection rates (p=0.571) or mean values of viral loads (p=0.400) were observed between the groups.Furthermore, complete genome sequence of a salivirus recovered from the feces of a child with diarrhea (i.e., SaliV-FHB) shared a 99% nucleotide identity with the sewage strain.In conclusion, a paired case-control study did not support a causative role for salivirus strains detected in this study with pediatric gastroenteritis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Viral Diseases Control and Prevention, China CDC, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Salivirus was recently discovered in children with gastroenteritis and in sewage. Though a causative role for salivirus in childhood gastroenteritis was suggested in the previous study, the relationship between salivirus and acute gastroenteritis has not yet been clearly clarified. The sewage strain reported by Ng, although represented by incomplete genome sequencing data, was distinct from previously reported saliviruses, and had not previously been detected in humans. A case-control study examining 461 paired stool samples from children with diarrhea and healthy controls (1:1) was conducted in this study. Also, common diarrheal viruses were detected and complete genome of a salivirus was determined. Results showed that salivirus was detected in 16 (3.5%) and 13 (2.8%) of the case and control samples, respectively; no differences in detection rates (p=0.571) or mean values of viral loads (p=0.400) were observed between the groups. Multivariate Cox regression revealed no association between salivirus and gastroenteritis (p=0.774). The data also demonstrated that salivirus infection did not exacerbate clinical symptoms of gastroenteritis in children. Furthermore, complete genome sequence of a salivirus recovered from the feces of a child with diarrhea (i.e., SaliV-FHB) shared a 99% nucleotide identity with the sewage strain. In conclusion, a paired case-control study did not support a causative role for salivirus strains detected in this study with pediatric gastroenteritis. This study also demonstrated that all known saliviruses can be detected in the feces of children with or without gastroenteritis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A. The monthly distribution of major viral pathogens in pediatric patients with gastroenteritis. RV peaked during the winters in the two years, NoV/SaV, AstV and AdV exhibited no marked seasonal distribution. B. The monthly distribution of salivirus in pediatric patients with gastroenteritis. The viruses in the case and control groups were detected in the hottest days of the year. Note: Y axis representing accumulating positive rate greater than 100% is due to some of the specimens were positive for more than one virus.
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pone.0130977.g001: A. The monthly distribution of major viral pathogens in pediatric patients with gastroenteritis. RV peaked during the winters in the two years, NoV/SaV, AstV and AdV exhibited no marked seasonal distribution. B. The monthly distribution of salivirus in pediatric patients with gastroenteritis. The viruses in the case and control groups were detected in the hottest days of the year. Note: Y axis representing accumulating positive rate greater than 100% is due to some of the specimens were positive for more than one virus.

Mentions: The ages of children comprising the 461 subject pairs ranged between 1 and 58 months (mean age = 11.67 ± 8.42 months). The majority of the children (93.93%) were 1–24 months of age. The ratio of females to males was 1.88:1. In the case group, RV was the most commonly detected virus (40.6%), followed by NoV/SaV (31.5%), AdV (10.9%) and AstV (3.3%); in the control group, NoV/SaV were the most-commonly detected viruses (14.3%), followed by AdV (2.6%), RV (1.7%) and AstV (1.3%). The monthly distribution of the viral pathogens are described in Fig 1A, which suggests that RV detection peaked during the two winters, whereas NoV/SaV, AstV and AdV exhibited no marked seasonal distribution.


Salivirus in Children and Its Association with Childhood Acute Gastroenteritis: A Paired Case-Control Study.

Yu JM, Ao YY, Liu N, Li LL, Duan ZJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

A. The monthly distribution of major viral pathogens in pediatric patients with gastroenteritis. RV peaked during the winters in the two years, NoV/SaV, AstV and AdV exhibited no marked seasonal distribution. B. The monthly distribution of salivirus in pediatric patients with gastroenteritis. The viruses in the case and control groups were detected in the hottest days of the year. Note: Y axis representing accumulating positive rate greater than 100% is due to some of the specimens were positive for more than one virus.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4507861&req=5

pone.0130977.g001: A. The monthly distribution of major viral pathogens in pediatric patients with gastroenteritis. RV peaked during the winters in the two years, NoV/SaV, AstV and AdV exhibited no marked seasonal distribution. B. The monthly distribution of salivirus in pediatric patients with gastroenteritis. The viruses in the case and control groups were detected in the hottest days of the year. Note: Y axis representing accumulating positive rate greater than 100% is due to some of the specimens were positive for more than one virus.
Mentions: The ages of children comprising the 461 subject pairs ranged between 1 and 58 months (mean age = 11.67 ± 8.42 months). The majority of the children (93.93%) were 1–24 months of age. The ratio of females to males was 1.88:1. In the case group, RV was the most commonly detected virus (40.6%), followed by NoV/SaV (31.5%), AdV (10.9%) and AstV (3.3%); in the control group, NoV/SaV were the most-commonly detected viruses (14.3%), followed by AdV (2.6%), RV (1.7%) and AstV (1.3%). The monthly distribution of the viral pathogens are described in Fig 1A, which suggests that RV detection peaked during the two winters, whereas NoV/SaV, AstV and AdV exhibited no marked seasonal distribution.

Bottom Line: Results showed that salivirus was detected in 16 (3.5%) and 13 (2.8%) of the case and control samples, respectively; no differences in detection rates (p=0.571) or mean values of viral loads (p=0.400) were observed between the groups.Furthermore, complete genome sequence of a salivirus recovered from the feces of a child with diarrhea (i.e., SaliV-FHB) shared a 99% nucleotide identity with the sewage strain.In conclusion, a paired case-control study did not support a causative role for salivirus strains detected in this study with pediatric gastroenteritis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Viral Diseases Control and Prevention, China CDC, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Salivirus was recently discovered in children with gastroenteritis and in sewage. Though a causative role for salivirus in childhood gastroenteritis was suggested in the previous study, the relationship between salivirus and acute gastroenteritis has not yet been clearly clarified. The sewage strain reported by Ng, although represented by incomplete genome sequencing data, was distinct from previously reported saliviruses, and had not previously been detected in humans. A case-control study examining 461 paired stool samples from children with diarrhea and healthy controls (1:1) was conducted in this study. Also, common diarrheal viruses were detected and complete genome of a salivirus was determined. Results showed that salivirus was detected in 16 (3.5%) and 13 (2.8%) of the case and control samples, respectively; no differences in detection rates (p=0.571) or mean values of viral loads (p=0.400) were observed between the groups. Multivariate Cox regression revealed no association between salivirus and gastroenteritis (p=0.774). The data also demonstrated that salivirus infection did not exacerbate clinical symptoms of gastroenteritis in children. Furthermore, complete genome sequence of a salivirus recovered from the feces of a child with diarrhea (i.e., SaliV-FHB) shared a 99% nucleotide identity with the sewage strain. In conclusion, a paired case-control study did not support a causative role for salivirus strains detected in this study with pediatric gastroenteritis. This study also demonstrated that all known saliviruses can be detected in the feces of children with or without gastroenteritis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus