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Association between Occupational Exposure to Wood Dust and Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Alonso-Sardón M, Chamorro AJ, Hernández-García I, Iglesias-de-Sena H, Martín-Rodero H, Herrera C, Marcos M, Mirón-Canelo JA - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Low-to-moderate quality evidence that wood dust acts as a carcinogen was obtained, and a stronger association between wood dust and nasal adenocarcinoma was observed.A lesser association between wood dust exposure and lung cancer was also observed.A meta-analysis that included four case-controls studies showed that workers exposed to wood dust exhibited higher rates of nasal adenocarcinoma than other workers (odds ratio = 10.28; 95% confidence interval: 5.92 and 17.85; P<0,0001), although a large degree of heterogeneity was found.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Salamanca, Institute of Biomedical Research of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To perform a systematic review to analyze the association between occupational exposure to wood dust and cancer.

Methods: A systematic literature search of entries made in the MEDLINE-PubMed database between 1957 and 2013 was conducted to identify studies that had assessed the relationship between occupational exposure to wood dust and different types of cancer. A meta-analysis of selected case-control and cohort studies was subsequently performed.

Results: A total of 114 studies were identified and 70 were selected for review. Of these, 42 studies focused on the relationship between wood dust and nasal cancer (n = 22), lung cancer (n = 11), and other types of cancer (n = 9). Low-to-moderate quality evidence that wood dust acts as a carcinogen was obtained, and a stronger association between wood dust and nasal adenocarcinoma was observed. A lesser association between wood dust exposure and lung cancer was also observed. Several studies suggested that there is a relationship between wood dust and the onset of other cancers, although there was no evidence to establish an association. A meta-analysis that included four case-controls studies showed that workers exposed to wood dust exhibited higher rates of nasal adenocarcinoma than other workers (odds ratio = 10.28; 95% confidence interval: 5.92 and 17.85; P<0,0001), although a large degree of heterogeneity was found.

Conclusions: Low-to-moderate quality evidence supports a causal association between cancer and occupational exposure to wood dust, and this association was stronger for nasal adenocarcinoma than for lung cancer. There was no evidence of an association between wood dust exposure and the other cancers examined.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A PRISMA flowchart that illustrates the search strategy used to identify articles included in this systematic review.
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pone.0133024.g001: A PRISMA flowchart that illustrates the search strategy used to identify articles included in this systematic review.

Mentions: Among the articles that investigated the relationship between exposure to wood dust and cancer and were published between 1975 and September 2013, 70 studies were selected for this review. Reports which only included opinions and/or recommendations from experts were excluded. Of the 70 selected studies, 42 had investigated the relationship between wood dust exposure and cancer according to the incidence of nasal ADCN (n = 22), lung cancer (n = 11), and other cancers (n = 9) (see Fig 1).


Association between Occupational Exposure to Wood Dust and Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Alonso-Sardón M, Chamorro AJ, Hernández-García I, Iglesias-de-Sena H, Martín-Rodero H, Herrera C, Marcos M, Mirón-Canelo JA - PLoS ONE (2015)

A PRISMA flowchart that illustrates the search strategy used to identify articles included in this systematic review.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4507857&req=5

pone.0133024.g001: A PRISMA flowchart that illustrates the search strategy used to identify articles included in this systematic review.
Mentions: Among the articles that investigated the relationship between exposure to wood dust and cancer and were published between 1975 and September 2013, 70 studies were selected for this review. Reports which only included opinions and/or recommendations from experts were excluded. Of the 70 selected studies, 42 had investigated the relationship between wood dust exposure and cancer according to the incidence of nasal ADCN (n = 22), lung cancer (n = 11), and other cancers (n = 9) (see Fig 1).

Bottom Line: Low-to-moderate quality evidence that wood dust acts as a carcinogen was obtained, and a stronger association between wood dust and nasal adenocarcinoma was observed.A lesser association between wood dust exposure and lung cancer was also observed.A meta-analysis that included four case-controls studies showed that workers exposed to wood dust exhibited higher rates of nasal adenocarcinoma than other workers (odds ratio = 10.28; 95% confidence interval: 5.92 and 17.85; P<0,0001), although a large degree of heterogeneity was found.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Salamanca, Institute of Biomedical Research of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To perform a systematic review to analyze the association between occupational exposure to wood dust and cancer.

Methods: A systematic literature search of entries made in the MEDLINE-PubMed database between 1957 and 2013 was conducted to identify studies that had assessed the relationship between occupational exposure to wood dust and different types of cancer. A meta-analysis of selected case-control and cohort studies was subsequently performed.

Results: A total of 114 studies were identified and 70 were selected for review. Of these, 42 studies focused on the relationship between wood dust and nasal cancer (n = 22), lung cancer (n = 11), and other types of cancer (n = 9). Low-to-moderate quality evidence that wood dust acts as a carcinogen was obtained, and a stronger association between wood dust and nasal adenocarcinoma was observed. A lesser association between wood dust exposure and lung cancer was also observed. Several studies suggested that there is a relationship between wood dust and the onset of other cancers, although there was no evidence to establish an association. A meta-analysis that included four case-controls studies showed that workers exposed to wood dust exhibited higher rates of nasal adenocarcinoma than other workers (odds ratio = 10.28; 95% confidence interval: 5.92 and 17.85; P<0,0001), although a large degree of heterogeneity was found.

Conclusions: Low-to-moderate quality evidence supports a causal association between cancer and occupational exposure to wood dust, and this association was stronger for nasal adenocarcinoma than for lung cancer. There was no evidence of an association between wood dust exposure and the other cancers examined.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus