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A family cluster of Chagas disease detected through selective screening of blood donors: A case report and brief review.

Mongeau-Martin G, Ndao M, Libman M, Delage G, Ward BJ - Can J Infect Dis Med Microbiol (2015 May-Jun)

Bottom Line: They were referred to the JD MacLean Centre for Tropical Diseases (Montreal, Quebec) for confirmatory testing (T cruzi excreted-secreted antigen ELISA, polymerase chain reaction and/or radioimmunoprecipitation assay) and follow-up.With blood donor screening, Canadian physicians will increasingly see patients with CD and should know how to manage them appropriately.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: JD MacLean Tropical Diseases Centre, Montreal;

ABSTRACT
Chagas disease (CD) is a protozoan infection caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted by triatomine insect vectors in parts of Latin America. In a nonendemic country, such as Canada, spread can still occur via vertical transmission, and infected blood or organ donations. The Canadian Blood Services and Héma-Québec have both implemented selective screening of blood donors for CD based on risk factors. In 2011, Héma-Québec identified two seropositive 'at-risk' Chilean siblings who had donated blood in Montreal, Quebec. They were referred to the JD MacLean Centre for Tropical Diseases (Montreal, Quebec) for confirmatory testing (T cruzi excreted-secreted antigen ELISA, polymerase chain reaction and/or radioimmunoprecipitation assay) and follow-up. Screening of the rest of the family revealed two other seropositive family members (the mother and sister). While their geographical history in Chile suggests vectorial transmission, this family cluster of CD raises the possibility of vertical transmission. Congenital infection should always be considered among CD-positive mothers and pregnant women. With blood donor screening, Canadian physicians will increasingly see patients with CD and should know how to manage them appropriately. In addition to the case presentation, the authors review the transmission, screening and clinical management of CD in a nonendemic context.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Chile: Principal endemic area of Chagas disease in the middle of the 20th century (19,21). Produced using a blank map found on Wikimedia Commons (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Chile_location_map.svg).
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f2-idmm-26-157: Chile: Principal endemic area of Chagas disease in the middle of the 20th century (19,21). Produced using a blank map found on Wikimedia Commons (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Chile_location_map.svg).

Mentions: This family’s geographical history is useful in determining the relative risk of individual versus congenital infection (Figure 2). The parents (I:1, I:2) and their children (II:2, II:3, II:6, II:7) were all born in Chile. The mother (I:2) was born in 1944 in Limache, a small town north of Santiago. The father (I:1) was born in 1941 in La Serena, and moved to Limache when he married I:2 in 1960. Their first two children (II:2, II:3) were born in Limache in 1961 and 1962, respectively. In 1964, the family moved to Concepción, a larger city south of Santiago, where the two youngest children (II:6, II:7) were born (1964 and 1973, respectively). After the Chilean political turmoil in 1973, the family was separated: the oldest siblings (II:2, II:3) moved north to La Serena, the mother (I:2) left for Santiago with her youngest daughter (II:7), and her other daughter (II:6) moved to Limache. Finally, in 1979, the entire family emigrated to the province of Quebec, where they currently reside.


A family cluster of Chagas disease detected through selective screening of blood donors: A case report and brief review.

Mongeau-Martin G, Ndao M, Libman M, Delage G, Ward BJ - Can J Infect Dis Med Microbiol (2015 May-Jun)

Chile: Principal endemic area of Chagas disease in the middle of the 20th century (19,21). Produced using a blank map found on Wikimedia Commons (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Chile_location_map.svg).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4507842&req=5

f2-idmm-26-157: Chile: Principal endemic area of Chagas disease in the middle of the 20th century (19,21). Produced using a blank map found on Wikimedia Commons (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Chile_location_map.svg).
Mentions: This family’s geographical history is useful in determining the relative risk of individual versus congenital infection (Figure 2). The parents (I:1, I:2) and their children (II:2, II:3, II:6, II:7) were all born in Chile. The mother (I:2) was born in 1944 in Limache, a small town north of Santiago. The father (I:1) was born in 1941 in La Serena, and moved to Limache when he married I:2 in 1960. Their first two children (II:2, II:3) were born in Limache in 1961 and 1962, respectively. In 1964, the family moved to Concepción, a larger city south of Santiago, where the two youngest children (II:6, II:7) were born (1964 and 1973, respectively). After the Chilean political turmoil in 1973, the family was separated: the oldest siblings (II:2, II:3) moved north to La Serena, the mother (I:2) left for Santiago with her youngest daughter (II:7), and her other daughter (II:6) moved to Limache. Finally, in 1979, the entire family emigrated to the province of Quebec, where they currently reside.

Bottom Line: They were referred to the JD MacLean Centre for Tropical Diseases (Montreal, Quebec) for confirmatory testing (T cruzi excreted-secreted antigen ELISA, polymerase chain reaction and/or radioimmunoprecipitation assay) and follow-up.With blood donor screening, Canadian physicians will increasingly see patients with CD and should know how to manage them appropriately.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: JD MacLean Tropical Diseases Centre, Montreal;

ABSTRACT
Chagas disease (CD) is a protozoan infection caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted by triatomine insect vectors in parts of Latin America. In a nonendemic country, such as Canada, spread can still occur via vertical transmission, and infected blood or organ donations. The Canadian Blood Services and Héma-Québec have both implemented selective screening of blood donors for CD based on risk factors. In 2011, Héma-Québec identified two seropositive 'at-risk' Chilean siblings who had donated blood in Montreal, Quebec. They were referred to the JD MacLean Centre for Tropical Diseases (Montreal, Quebec) for confirmatory testing (T cruzi excreted-secreted antigen ELISA, polymerase chain reaction and/or radioimmunoprecipitation assay) and follow-up. Screening of the rest of the family revealed two other seropositive family members (the mother and sister). While their geographical history in Chile suggests vectorial transmission, this family cluster of CD raises the possibility of vertical transmission. Congenital infection should always be considered among CD-positive mothers and pregnant women. With blood donor screening, Canadian physicians will increasingly see patients with CD and should know how to manage them appropriately. In addition to the case presentation, the authors review the transmission, screening and clinical management of CD in a nonendemic context.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus