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A novel NAP member GhNAP is involved in leaf senescence in Gossypium hirsutum.

Fan K, Bibi N, Gan S, Li F, Yuan S, Ni M, Wang M, Shen H, Wang X - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, the expression of GhNAP was closely associated with leaf senescence.Moreover, the expression of GhNAP can be induced by abscisic acid (ABA), and the delayed leaf senescence phenotype in GhNAPi plants might be caused by the decreased ABA level and reduced expression level of ABA-responsive genes.All of the results suggested that GhNAP could regulate the leaf senescence via the ABA-mediated pathways and was further related to the yield and quality in cotton.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Crop Science, College of Agriculture and Biotechnology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, PR China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Structural, phylogenetic, subcellular localization, and transcriptional activation analysis of GhNAP. (A) The NAC domain and TAR of GhNAP. Subdomains are shown by rectangles. (B) Phylogenetic analysis of GhNAP. The phylogenetic tree was constructed using the Bayesian method based on the multiple alignments of 23 NAP protein sequences. The tree is unrooted. The numbers in the clades are posterior probability values. (C) Distribution of 15 putative conserved motifs in the NAP subfamily by the MEME search tool. Different motifs are represented by various boxes. The location of each motif can be estimated using the scale at the bottom. The groups within the NAP subfamily are classified by different brackets according to the phylogenetic relationship. (D) Subcellular localization of GhNAP. The GhNAP–GFP fusion protein and free GFP were transiently expressed in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants expressing RFP–H2B, and the transformed leaves were observed by confocal microscopy. Images in the first column show cells with the GFP signal. Images in the second column show the bright-field view of the same cells. Images in the third column show the same cells with the RFP signal, and the images in the fourth column are the overlays of the bright-field and fluorescent images. Scale bar=20 μm. (E) Transcriptional activation analysis of GhNAP in yeast. The full length and the N- (GhNAP-N) and C-terminal (GhNAP-C) regions of GhNAP were inserted into the pGBKT7 vector. The pGBKT7 plasmid was used as the negative control. The above four constructs were transformed into yeast on SD/–Trp and SD/–Trp/X-α-Gal/AbA media for examination of growth. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)
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Figure 1: Structural, phylogenetic, subcellular localization, and transcriptional activation analysis of GhNAP. (A) The NAC domain and TAR of GhNAP. Subdomains are shown by rectangles. (B) Phylogenetic analysis of GhNAP. The phylogenetic tree was constructed using the Bayesian method based on the multiple alignments of 23 NAP protein sequences. The tree is unrooted. The numbers in the clades are posterior probability values. (C) Distribution of 15 putative conserved motifs in the NAP subfamily by the MEME search tool. Different motifs are represented by various boxes. The location of each motif can be estimated using the scale at the bottom. The groups within the NAP subfamily are classified by different brackets according to the phylogenetic relationship. (D) Subcellular localization of GhNAP. The GhNAP–GFP fusion protein and free GFP were transiently expressed in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants expressing RFP–H2B, and the transformed leaves were observed by confocal microscopy. Images in the first column show cells with the GFP signal. Images in the second column show the bright-field view of the same cells. Images in the third column show the same cells with the RFP signal, and the images in the fourth column are the overlays of the bright-field and fluorescent images. Scale bar=20 μm. (E) Transcriptional activation analysis of GhNAP in yeast. The full length and the N- (GhNAP-N) and C-terminal (GhNAP-C) regions of GhNAP were inserted into the pGBKT7 vector. The pGBKT7 plasmid was used as the negative control. The above four constructs were transformed into yeast on SD/–Trp and SD/–Trp/X-α-Gal/AbA media for examination of growth. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)

Mentions: AtNAP was used as the query to search G. hirsutum ESTs. Through comprehensive analysis with AtNAP, a unigene (EV490808, DR455718, DN800623, and CA992692) was selected and tentatively called GhNAP. GhNAP contained the whole ORF, so a pair of PCR primers was designed to clone the GhNAP sequence. Sequencing results showed that GhNAP contained the 861bp ORF encoding 286 amino acids (Fig. 1A).


A novel NAP member GhNAP is involved in leaf senescence in Gossypium hirsutum.

Fan K, Bibi N, Gan S, Li F, Yuan S, Ni M, Wang M, Shen H, Wang X - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Structural, phylogenetic, subcellular localization, and transcriptional activation analysis of GhNAP. (A) The NAC domain and TAR of GhNAP. Subdomains are shown by rectangles. (B) Phylogenetic analysis of GhNAP. The phylogenetic tree was constructed using the Bayesian method based on the multiple alignments of 23 NAP protein sequences. The tree is unrooted. The numbers in the clades are posterior probability values. (C) Distribution of 15 putative conserved motifs in the NAP subfamily by the MEME search tool. Different motifs are represented by various boxes. The location of each motif can be estimated using the scale at the bottom. The groups within the NAP subfamily are classified by different brackets according to the phylogenetic relationship. (D) Subcellular localization of GhNAP. The GhNAP–GFP fusion protein and free GFP were transiently expressed in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants expressing RFP–H2B, and the transformed leaves were observed by confocal microscopy. Images in the first column show cells with the GFP signal. Images in the second column show the bright-field view of the same cells. Images in the third column show the same cells with the RFP signal, and the images in the fourth column are the overlays of the bright-field and fluorescent images. Scale bar=20 μm. (E) Transcriptional activation analysis of GhNAP in yeast. The full length and the N- (GhNAP-N) and C-terminal (GhNAP-C) regions of GhNAP were inserted into the pGBKT7 vector. The pGBKT7 plasmid was used as the negative control. The above four constructs were transformed into yeast on SD/–Trp and SD/–Trp/X-α-Gal/AbA media for examination of growth. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 1: Structural, phylogenetic, subcellular localization, and transcriptional activation analysis of GhNAP. (A) The NAC domain and TAR of GhNAP. Subdomains are shown by rectangles. (B) Phylogenetic analysis of GhNAP. The phylogenetic tree was constructed using the Bayesian method based on the multiple alignments of 23 NAP protein sequences. The tree is unrooted. The numbers in the clades are posterior probability values. (C) Distribution of 15 putative conserved motifs in the NAP subfamily by the MEME search tool. Different motifs are represented by various boxes. The location of each motif can be estimated using the scale at the bottom. The groups within the NAP subfamily are classified by different brackets according to the phylogenetic relationship. (D) Subcellular localization of GhNAP. The GhNAP–GFP fusion protein and free GFP were transiently expressed in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants expressing RFP–H2B, and the transformed leaves were observed by confocal microscopy. Images in the first column show cells with the GFP signal. Images in the second column show the bright-field view of the same cells. Images in the third column show the same cells with the RFP signal, and the images in the fourth column are the overlays of the bright-field and fluorescent images. Scale bar=20 μm. (E) Transcriptional activation analysis of GhNAP in yeast. The full length and the N- (GhNAP-N) and C-terminal (GhNAP-C) regions of GhNAP were inserted into the pGBKT7 vector. The pGBKT7 plasmid was used as the negative control. The above four constructs were transformed into yeast on SD/–Trp and SD/–Trp/X-α-Gal/AbA media for examination of growth. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)
Mentions: AtNAP was used as the query to search G. hirsutum ESTs. Through comprehensive analysis with AtNAP, a unigene (EV490808, DR455718, DN800623, and CA992692) was selected and tentatively called GhNAP. GhNAP contained the whole ORF, so a pair of PCR primers was designed to clone the GhNAP sequence. Sequencing results showed that GhNAP contained the 861bp ORF encoding 286 amino acids (Fig. 1A).

Bottom Line: Furthermore, the expression of GhNAP was closely associated with leaf senescence.Moreover, the expression of GhNAP can be induced by abscisic acid (ABA), and the delayed leaf senescence phenotype in GhNAPi plants might be caused by the decreased ABA level and reduced expression level of ABA-responsive genes.All of the results suggested that GhNAP could regulate the leaf senescence via the ABA-mediated pathways and was further related to the yield and quality in cotton.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Crop Science, College of Agriculture and Biotechnology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, PR China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus