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Characterization of the promoter and extended C-terminal domain of Arabidopsis WRKY33 and functional analysis of tomato WRKY33 homologues in plant stress responses.

Zhou J, Wang J, Zheng Z, Fan B, Yu JQ, Chen Z - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Bottom Line: We compared AtWRKY33 with its close homologues to identify AtWRKY33-specific regulatory and structural elements, which were then functionally analysed through complementation.Thus, WRKY33 proteins are evolutionarily conserved with a critical role in broad plant stress responses.Both its CTD and promoter are critical for the uniquely important roles of WRKY33 in plant stress responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Horticulture, Zijingang Campus, Zhejiang University, Yuhangtang Road 866, Hangzhou 310058, China Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, 915W. State Street, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2054, USA jie@zju.edu.cn zhixiang@purdue.edu.

No MeSH data available.


Botrytis-induced expression of tomato SlWRKY33A and SlWRKY33B. Tomato leaves were drop-inoculated with buffer (mock) or Botrytis spores and leaf tissues were collected at indicated times for total RNA isolation and determination of the gene transcript levels using qRT-PCR with tomato Actin gene as internal control. Error bars indicate SE (n=3).
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Figure 9: Botrytis-induced expression of tomato SlWRKY33A and SlWRKY33B. Tomato leaves were drop-inoculated with buffer (mock) or Botrytis spores and leaf tissues were collected at indicated times for total RNA isolation and determination of the gene transcript levels using qRT-PCR with tomato Actin gene as internal control. Error bars indicate SE (n=3).

Mentions: To determine whether structurally related WRKY33 homologues from different plants are also functionally conserved, we chose to functionally analyse tomato SlWRKY33A and SlWRKY33B because both Botrytis resistance and heat tolerance can be tested in tomato, making the direct comparison possible with Arabidopsis. As a first step to determine the biological roles of tomato SlWRKY33A and SlWRKY33B, we analysed their expression in response to Botrytis infection and heat treatment. Tomato plants were inoculated with Botrytis and analysed for expression of SlWRKY33A and SlWRKY33B using qRT-PCR. For both genes, increased levels of transcripts were detected as early as 1 dpi but the major induction was observed at 2 and 3 dpi (Fig. 9). Heat-induced expression of SlWRKY33A and SlWRKY33B has been analysed by comparing their transcript levels in tomato plants placed in a 22°C or 45°C growth chamber (Zhou et al., 2014). The transcript levels of SlWRKY33A and SlWRKY33B remained constantly low at 22°C but were elevated with similar kinetics at 45°C (Zhou et al., 2014). Thus expression of the two tomato WRKY33 genes was induced by both Botrytis infection and heat stress.


Characterization of the promoter and extended C-terminal domain of Arabidopsis WRKY33 and functional analysis of tomato WRKY33 homologues in plant stress responses.

Zhou J, Wang J, Zheng Z, Fan B, Yu JQ, Chen Z - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Botrytis-induced expression of tomato SlWRKY33A and SlWRKY33B. Tomato leaves were drop-inoculated with buffer (mock) or Botrytis spores and leaf tissues were collected at indicated times for total RNA isolation and determination of the gene transcript levels using qRT-PCR with tomato Actin gene as internal control. Error bars indicate SE (n=3).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4507763&req=5

Figure 9: Botrytis-induced expression of tomato SlWRKY33A and SlWRKY33B. Tomato leaves were drop-inoculated with buffer (mock) or Botrytis spores and leaf tissues were collected at indicated times for total RNA isolation and determination of the gene transcript levels using qRT-PCR with tomato Actin gene as internal control. Error bars indicate SE (n=3).
Mentions: To determine whether structurally related WRKY33 homologues from different plants are also functionally conserved, we chose to functionally analyse tomato SlWRKY33A and SlWRKY33B because both Botrytis resistance and heat tolerance can be tested in tomato, making the direct comparison possible with Arabidopsis. As a first step to determine the biological roles of tomato SlWRKY33A and SlWRKY33B, we analysed their expression in response to Botrytis infection and heat treatment. Tomato plants were inoculated with Botrytis and analysed for expression of SlWRKY33A and SlWRKY33B using qRT-PCR. For both genes, increased levels of transcripts were detected as early as 1 dpi but the major induction was observed at 2 and 3 dpi (Fig. 9). Heat-induced expression of SlWRKY33A and SlWRKY33B has been analysed by comparing their transcript levels in tomato plants placed in a 22°C or 45°C growth chamber (Zhou et al., 2014). The transcript levels of SlWRKY33A and SlWRKY33B remained constantly low at 22°C but were elevated with similar kinetics at 45°C (Zhou et al., 2014). Thus expression of the two tomato WRKY33 genes was induced by both Botrytis infection and heat stress.

Bottom Line: We compared AtWRKY33 with its close homologues to identify AtWRKY33-specific regulatory and structural elements, which were then functionally analysed through complementation.Thus, WRKY33 proteins are evolutionarily conserved with a critical role in broad plant stress responses.Both its CTD and promoter are critical for the uniquely important roles of WRKY33 in plant stress responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Horticulture, Zijingang Campus, Zhejiang University, Yuhangtang Road 866, Hangzhou 310058, China Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, 915W. State Street, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2054, USA jie@zju.edu.cn zhixiang@purdue.edu.

No MeSH data available.