Limits...
Antimicrobial-resistant and ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in different ecological niches in Bangladesh.

Rashid M, Rakib MM, Hasan B - Infect Ecol Epidemiol (2015)

Bottom Line: Also, 1.2% of the ESBL-producing E. coli were isolated from OBS, whereas 50% of the E. coli isolated from water sources were ESBL producers possessing the CTX-M-15 gene.The most concerning aspect of our findings was the presence of human-associated E. coli sequence types in the water samples, for example, ST156-complex156, ST10-complex10 and ST46.This study reports the presence of multidrug-resistant ESBL-producing E. coli in OBSs and nearby aquatic sources in Bangladesh.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The rapid and wide-scale environmental spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria in different ecosystems has become a serious issue in recent years.

Objectives: To investigate the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance and extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) in Bangladeshi wild birds and aquatic environments, samples were taken from Open Bill Stork (Anastomus oscitans) (OBS) and the nearby water sources.

Methods: Water and fresh fecal samples were collected from several locations. All samples were processed and cultured for Escherichia coli and tested for antibiotic susceptibility against commonly used antibiotics. ESBL producers were characterized at genotypic level using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), sequencing, multilocus sequence typing, and rep-PCR.

Results and discussion: A total of 76 E. coli isolates from the 170 OBS and 8 E. coli isolates from three river sources were isolated. In total, 29% of E. coli isolated from OBS and all of the E. coli isolated from water sources were resistant to at least one of the tested antimicrobials. Resistant phenotypes were observed with all antimicrobials except tigecycline, gentamicin, imipenem, and chloramphenicol. Multidrug resistance was observed in 2.6% of OBS and 37.5% of the water isolates. Also, 1.2% of the ESBL-producing E. coli were isolated from OBS, whereas 50% of the E. coli isolated from water sources were ESBL producers possessing the CTX-M-15 gene. The most concerning aspect of our findings was the presence of human-associated E. coli sequence types in the water samples, for example, ST156-complex156, ST10-complex10 and ST46.

Conclusion: This study reports the presence of multidrug-resistant ESBL-producing E. coli in OBSs and nearby aquatic sources in Bangladesh.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Locations of Sample collection in Bangladesh.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4507753&req=5

Figure 0001: Locations of Sample collection in Bangladesh.

Mentions: Fresh fecal droppings (n=170) were collected randomly from two different Asian Open Bill Stork (OBS) (Anastomus oscitans) colonies in Padma Char and Hakaluki haor areas (Fig. 1) in Bangladesh from January to February 2010. Sterile cotton swabs were used to take the fresh fecal samples. All samples, immediately after collection in the field, were stored in sterile tubes containing bacterial freeze media Luria-Bertani broth (phosphate-buffered saline and 4.4% glycerol). The Padma River, previously named as the Ganges, is the biggest river in Bangladesh and on the banks of the Padma, major human settlement has developed. Due to unplanned settlement of the riverside cities, all wastewater from the city and livestock farms ended up into the rivers. The Buriganga River is another small river that passes through the capital city of Dhaka and is one of the most polluted rivers in Bangladesh (17). Along with birds, water samples were also collected during that time from the Padma River, the Buriganga River, and Hakaluki haor. Forty milliliters of water samples was taken in a Falcon tube containing bacterial freeze media. From each location, 2–3 water samples were collected, having a distance of 1 km between the sampling sites. Water and fecal samples were stored in liquid nitrogen tanks and later stored at −80°C. All samples were shipped in an unbroken freeze chain for further analysis.


Antimicrobial-resistant and ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in different ecological niches in Bangladesh.

Rashid M, Rakib MM, Hasan B - Infect Ecol Epidemiol (2015)

Locations of Sample collection in Bangladesh.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4507753&req=5

Figure 0001: Locations of Sample collection in Bangladesh.
Mentions: Fresh fecal droppings (n=170) were collected randomly from two different Asian Open Bill Stork (OBS) (Anastomus oscitans) colonies in Padma Char and Hakaluki haor areas (Fig. 1) in Bangladesh from January to February 2010. Sterile cotton swabs were used to take the fresh fecal samples. All samples, immediately after collection in the field, were stored in sterile tubes containing bacterial freeze media Luria-Bertani broth (phosphate-buffered saline and 4.4% glycerol). The Padma River, previously named as the Ganges, is the biggest river in Bangladesh and on the banks of the Padma, major human settlement has developed. Due to unplanned settlement of the riverside cities, all wastewater from the city and livestock farms ended up into the rivers. The Buriganga River is another small river that passes through the capital city of Dhaka and is one of the most polluted rivers in Bangladesh (17). Along with birds, water samples were also collected during that time from the Padma River, the Buriganga River, and Hakaluki haor. Forty milliliters of water samples was taken in a Falcon tube containing bacterial freeze media. From each location, 2–3 water samples were collected, having a distance of 1 km between the sampling sites. Water and fecal samples were stored in liquid nitrogen tanks and later stored at −80°C. All samples were shipped in an unbroken freeze chain for further analysis.

Bottom Line: Also, 1.2% of the ESBL-producing E. coli were isolated from OBS, whereas 50% of the E. coli isolated from water sources were ESBL producers possessing the CTX-M-15 gene.The most concerning aspect of our findings was the presence of human-associated E. coli sequence types in the water samples, for example, ST156-complex156, ST10-complex10 and ST46.This study reports the presence of multidrug-resistant ESBL-producing E. coli in OBSs and nearby aquatic sources in Bangladesh.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The rapid and wide-scale environmental spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria in different ecosystems has become a serious issue in recent years.

Objectives: To investigate the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance and extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) in Bangladeshi wild birds and aquatic environments, samples were taken from Open Bill Stork (Anastomus oscitans) (OBS) and the nearby water sources.

Methods: Water and fresh fecal samples were collected from several locations. All samples were processed and cultured for Escherichia coli and tested for antibiotic susceptibility against commonly used antibiotics. ESBL producers were characterized at genotypic level using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), sequencing, multilocus sequence typing, and rep-PCR.

Results and discussion: A total of 76 E. coli isolates from the 170 OBS and 8 E. coli isolates from three river sources were isolated. In total, 29% of E. coli isolated from OBS and all of the E. coli isolated from water sources were resistant to at least one of the tested antimicrobials. Resistant phenotypes were observed with all antimicrobials except tigecycline, gentamicin, imipenem, and chloramphenicol. Multidrug resistance was observed in 2.6% of OBS and 37.5% of the water isolates. Also, 1.2% of the ESBL-producing E. coli were isolated from OBS, whereas 50% of the E. coli isolated from water sources were ESBL producers possessing the CTX-M-15 gene. The most concerning aspect of our findings was the presence of human-associated E. coli sequence types in the water samples, for example, ST156-complex156, ST10-complex10 and ST46.

Conclusion: This study reports the presence of multidrug-resistant ESBL-producing E. coli in OBSs and nearby aquatic sources in Bangladesh.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus