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Human-Automation Interaction Design for Adaptive Cruise Control Systems of Ground Vehicles.

Eom H, Lee SH - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: ACC systems have several operational modes, and drivers can be unaware of the mode in which they are operating.To investigate the effectiveness of our methodology, we designed two new interfaces by separately modifying the machine model and the interface model and then performed driver-in-the-loop experiments.The results showed that modifying the machine model provides a more compact, acceptable, effective, and safe interface than modifying the interface model.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Intelligent HMI/CAD Lab, Graduate School of Automotive Engineering, Kookmin University, 77 Jeongneung-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-702, Korea. djagnltn@hanmail.net.

ABSTRACT
A majority of recently developed advanced vehicles have been equipped with various automated driver assistance systems, such as adaptive cruise control (ACC) and lane keeping assistance systems. ACC systems have several operational modes, and drivers can be unaware of the mode in which they are operating. Because mode confusion is a significant human error factor that contributes to traffic accidents, it is necessary to develop user interfaces for ACC systems that can reduce mode confusion. To meet this requirement, this paper presents a new human-automation interaction design methodology in which the compatibility of the machine and interface models is determined using the proposed criteria, and if the models are incompatible, one or both of the models is/are modified to make them compatible. To investigate the effectiveness of our methodology, we designed two new interfaces by separately modifying the machine model and the interface model and then performed driver-in-the-loop experiments. The results showed that modifying the machine model provides a more compact, acceptable, effective, and safe interface than modifying the interface model.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Graphical user interface for the ACC system implemented based on current interfaces.
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sensors-15-13916-f010: Graphical user interface for the ACC system implemented based on current interfaces.

Mentions: Graphical user interfaces for the interface models were implemented in a gauge cluster and were based on the user interfaces of the ACC systems made by major automotive manufacturers, including Hyundai, Lexus, and Mercedes-Benz. In Figure 10, “ACC” and “Set 70 km/h” represent a mode in the ACC system, and the figure in the center of the gauge cluster represents the internal state of the active mode. “ACC” distinguishes the off mode from the other modes, and its colors distinguish the modes. “Set 70 km/h” distinguishes the active and canceled modes; if “Set 70 km/h” is turned off, this indicates the system is in the canceled mode, whereas if “Set 70 km/h” is turned on, this indicates it is in the active mode. Based on the traditional and new interface models shown in Figure 4b and Figure 7, respectively, we designed new user interfaces as illustrated in Table 6. The different colors for the texts “ACC” and “Set 70 km/h” are intended to allow the user to more clearly distinguish between the modes and states.


Human-Automation Interaction Design for Adaptive Cruise Control Systems of Ground Vehicles.

Eom H, Lee SH - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Graphical user interface for the ACC system implemented based on current interfaces.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4507712&req=5

sensors-15-13916-f010: Graphical user interface for the ACC system implemented based on current interfaces.
Mentions: Graphical user interfaces for the interface models were implemented in a gauge cluster and were based on the user interfaces of the ACC systems made by major automotive manufacturers, including Hyundai, Lexus, and Mercedes-Benz. In Figure 10, “ACC” and “Set 70 km/h” represent a mode in the ACC system, and the figure in the center of the gauge cluster represents the internal state of the active mode. “ACC” distinguishes the off mode from the other modes, and its colors distinguish the modes. “Set 70 km/h” distinguishes the active and canceled modes; if “Set 70 km/h” is turned off, this indicates the system is in the canceled mode, whereas if “Set 70 km/h” is turned on, this indicates it is in the active mode. Based on the traditional and new interface models shown in Figure 4b and Figure 7, respectively, we designed new user interfaces as illustrated in Table 6. The different colors for the texts “ACC” and “Set 70 km/h” are intended to allow the user to more clearly distinguish between the modes and states.

Bottom Line: ACC systems have several operational modes, and drivers can be unaware of the mode in which they are operating.To investigate the effectiveness of our methodology, we designed two new interfaces by separately modifying the machine model and the interface model and then performed driver-in-the-loop experiments.The results showed that modifying the machine model provides a more compact, acceptable, effective, and safe interface than modifying the interface model.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Intelligent HMI/CAD Lab, Graduate School of Automotive Engineering, Kookmin University, 77 Jeongneung-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-702, Korea. djagnltn@hanmail.net.

ABSTRACT
A majority of recently developed advanced vehicles have been equipped with various automated driver assistance systems, such as adaptive cruise control (ACC) and lane keeping assistance systems. ACC systems have several operational modes, and drivers can be unaware of the mode in which they are operating. Because mode confusion is a significant human error factor that contributes to traffic accidents, it is necessary to develop user interfaces for ACC systems that can reduce mode confusion. To meet this requirement, this paper presents a new human-automation interaction design methodology in which the compatibility of the machine and interface models is determined using the proposed criteria, and if the models are incompatible, one or both of the models is/are modified to make them compatible. To investigate the effectiveness of our methodology, we designed two new interfaces by separately modifying the machine model and the interface model and then performed driver-in-the-loop experiments. The results showed that modifying the machine model provides a more compact, acceptable, effective, and safe interface than modifying the interface model.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus