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Human-Automation Interaction Design for Adaptive Cruise Control Systems of Ground Vehicles.

Eom H, Lee SH - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: ACC systems have several operational modes, and drivers can be unaware of the mode in which they are operating.To investigate the effectiveness of our methodology, we designed two new interfaces by separately modifying the machine model and the interface model and then performed driver-in-the-loop experiments.The results showed that modifying the machine model provides a more compact, acceptable, effective, and safe interface than modifying the interface model.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Intelligent HMI/CAD Lab, Graduate School of Automotive Engineering, Kookmin University, 77 Jeongneung-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-702, Korea. djagnltn@hanmail.net.

ABSTRACT
A majority of recently developed advanced vehicles have been equipped with various automated driver assistance systems, such as adaptive cruise control (ACC) and lane keeping assistance systems. ACC systems have several operational modes, and drivers can be unaware of the mode in which they are operating. Because mode confusion is a significant human error factor that contributes to traffic accidents, it is necessary to develop user interfaces for ACC systems that can reduce mode confusion. To meet this requirement, this paper presents a new human-automation interaction design methodology in which the compatibility of the machine and interface models is determined using the proposed criteria, and if the models are incompatible, one or both of the models is/are modified to make them compatible. To investigate the effectiveness of our methodology, we designed two new interfaces by separately modifying the machine model and the interface model and then performed driver-in-the-loop experiments. The results showed that modifying the machine model provides a more compact, acceptable, effective, and safe interface than modifying the interface model.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Design of new interface models for the ACC system: (a) five-mode interface model; and (b) three-mode interface model.
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sensors-15-13916-f007: Design of new interface models for the ACC system: (a) five-mode interface model; and (b) three-mode interface model.

Mentions: First, following the machine-centric approach, we divided the standby mode into separate modes for each incompatible state. Thus, as shown in Figure 7a, the standby mode was partitioned into the override, canceled, and armed modes, which include the override, canceled, and armed states, respectively. The state and mode transition table of the new user interface, shown in Table 5, demonstrates that the incompatible mode transitions are eliminated by this mode division. In our previous study [17], this proposed model was evaluated and compared with the traditional three-mode interface model shown in Figure 4a. The five-mode interface showed a lower rate of mode confusion than the conventional three-mode interface. However, the five-mode interface has such numerous overly detailed modes that it may be difficult for drivers to learn how to use it and become familiar with it. This complication arises because we accepted the traditional machine model and then designed a compatible interface model without modifying the machine model. This strategy restricted the freedom of the interface design and prevented us from developing a user-centric system. Norman [22] defined user-centric design as “a philosophy based on the needs and interests of the user, with an emphasis on making products usable and understandable”. He explained that products are usable and understandable when the user can figure out what to do and tell what is going on. Therefore, we expected that the system designed by the interface-centric approach would be more user-friendly and increase the usability which plays an important role in the acceptability of the system from user [23].


Human-Automation Interaction Design for Adaptive Cruise Control Systems of Ground Vehicles.

Eom H, Lee SH - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Design of new interface models for the ACC system: (a) five-mode interface model; and (b) three-mode interface model.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4507712&req=5

sensors-15-13916-f007: Design of new interface models for the ACC system: (a) five-mode interface model; and (b) three-mode interface model.
Mentions: First, following the machine-centric approach, we divided the standby mode into separate modes for each incompatible state. Thus, as shown in Figure 7a, the standby mode was partitioned into the override, canceled, and armed modes, which include the override, canceled, and armed states, respectively. The state and mode transition table of the new user interface, shown in Table 5, demonstrates that the incompatible mode transitions are eliminated by this mode division. In our previous study [17], this proposed model was evaluated and compared with the traditional three-mode interface model shown in Figure 4a. The five-mode interface showed a lower rate of mode confusion than the conventional three-mode interface. However, the five-mode interface has such numerous overly detailed modes that it may be difficult for drivers to learn how to use it and become familiar with it. This complication arises because we accepted the traditional machine model and then designed a compatible interface model without modifying the machine model. This strategy restricted the freedom of the interface design and prevented us from developing a user-centric system. Norman [22] defined user-centric design as “a philosophy based on the needs and interests of the user, with an emphasis on making products usable and understandable”. He explained that products are usable and understandable when the user can figure out what to do and tell what is going on. Therefore, we expected that the system designed by the interface-centric approach would be more user-friendly and increase the usability which plays an important role in the acceptability of the system from user [23].

Bottom Line: ACC systems have several operational modes, and drivers can be unaware of the mode in which they are operating.To investigate the effectiveness of our methodology, we designed two new interfaces by separately modifying the machine model and the interface model and then performed driver-in-the-loop experiments.The results showed that modifying the machine model provides a more compact, acceptable, effective, and safe interface than modifying the interface model.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Intelligent HMI/CAD Lab, Graduate School of Automotive Engineering, Kookmin University, 77 Jeongneung-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-702, Korea. djagnltn@hanmail.net.

ABSTRACT
A majority of recently developed advanced vehicles have been equipped with various automated driver assistance systems, such as adaptive cruise control (ACC) and lane keeping assistance systems. ACC systems have several operational modes, and drivers can be unaware of the mode in which they are operating. Because mode confusion is a significant human error factor that contributes to traffic accidents, it is necessary to develop user interfaces for ACC systems that can reduce mode confusion. To meet this requirement, this paper presents a new human-automation interaction design methodology in which the compatibility of the machine and interface models is determined using the proposed criteria, and if the models are incompatible, one or both of the models is/are modified to make them compatible. To investigate the effectiveness of our methodology, we designed two new interfaces by separately modifying the machine model and the interface model and then performed driver-in-the-loop experiments. The results showed that modifying the machine model provides a more compact, acceptable, effective, and safe interface than modifying the interface model.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus