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Supplemental blue LED lighting array to improve the signal quality in hyperspectral imaging of plants.

Mahlein AK, Hammersley S, Oerke EC, Dehne HW, Goldbach H, Grieve B - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: Hyperspectral imaging systems used in plant science or agriculture often have suboptimal signal-to-noise ratio in the blue region (400-500 nm) of the electromagnetic spectrum.Typically there are two principal reasons for this effect, the low sensitivity of the imaging sensor and the low amount of light available from the illuminating source.In plant science, the blue region contains relevant information about the physiology and the health status of a plant.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, National Taiwan University, No.1, Roosevelt Road, Sec.4, Taipei 10617, Taiwan. amahlein@uni-bonn.de.

ABSTRACT
Hyperspectral imaging systems used in plant science or agriculture often have suboptimal signal-to-noise ratio in the blue region (400-500 nm) of the electromagnetic spectrum. Typically there are two principal reasons for this effect, the low sensitivity of the imaging sensor and the low amount of light available from the illuminating source. In plant science, the blue region contains relevant information about the physiology and the health status of a plant. We report on the improvement in sensitivity of a hyperspectral imaging system in the blue region of the spectrum by using supplemental illumination provided by an array of high brightness light emitting diodes (LEDs) with an emission peak at 470 nm.

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(a) Hyperspectral imaging setup for measurements of the reflectance of plants under controlled conditions with artificial illumination; and (b) installation of the supplemental Blue LED-array next to the ASD-Pro-Lamps. (Best viewed in colour).
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sensors-15-12834-f001: (a) Hyperspectral imaging setup for measurements of the reflectance of plants under controlled conditions with artificial illumination; and (b) installation of the supplemental Blue LED-array next to the ASD-Pro-Lamps. (Best viewed in colour).

Mentions: Hyperspectral images were recorded with a line scanning spectrograph (ImSpector V10E, Spectral Imaging Ltd., Oulu, Finland) covering the VIS and the NIR ranges from 400 to 1000 nm, with a spectral resolution of up to 2.8 nm and a spatial resolution of 0.12 mm per pixel, resulting in 210 hyperspectral bands (Figure 1a). As experimental plants sugar beets, cultivar Pauletta (KWS, Einbeck, Germany), diseased with Cercospora leaf spot and sugar beet rust were used (plant material was prepared according to [9]). Constant illumination was provided by six ASD-Pro-Lamps (Analytical Spectral Devices Inc., Boulder, CO, USA) (Figure 1b). The hyperspectral camera and the illumination system were installed on a motorized line scanner (Spectral Imaging Ltd.) to obtain a second spatial dimension. The camera settings and the control of the motorized line scanner were adapted using the SpectralCube software (Version 3.62, 2000, Spectral Imaging Ltd.). Hyperspectral images were recorded in a dark chamber in order to realize constant and reproducible illumination and measurement conditions. Normalization of raw hyperspectral images was performed using the software ENVI 4.6+IDL 7.0 (EXELIS Visual Information Solutions, Boulder, CO, USA). Reflectance was calculated relative to a white reference bar and to dark current measurement.


Supplemental blue LED lighting array to improve the signal quality in hyperspectral imaging of plants.

Mahlein AK, Hammersley S, Oerke EC, Dehne HW, Goldbach H, Grieve B - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

(a) Hyperspectral imaging setup for measurements of the reflectance of plants under controlled conditions with artificial illumination; and (b) installation of the supplemental Blue LED-array next to the ASD-Pro-Lamps. (Best viewed in colour).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4507686&req=5

sensors-15-12834-f001: (a) Hyperspectral imaging setup for measurements of the reflectance of plants under controlled conditions with artificial illumination; and (b) installation of the supplemental Blue LED-array next to the ASD-Pro-Lamps. (Best viewed in colour).
Mentions: Hyperspectral images were recorded with a line scanning spectrograph (ImSpector V10E, Spectral Imaging Ltd., Oulu, Finland) covering the VIS and the NIR ranges from 400 to 1000 nm, with a spectral resolution of up to 2.8 nm and a spatial resolution of 0.12 mm per pixel, resulting in 210 hyperspectral bands (Figure 1a). As experimental plants sugar beets, cultivar Pauletta (KWS, Einbeck, Germany), diseased with Cercospora leaf spot and sugar beet rust were used (plant material was prepared according to [9]). Constant illumination was provided by six ASD-Pro-Lamps (Analytical Spectral Devices Inc., Boulder, CO, USA) (Figure 1b). The hyperspectral camera and the illumination system were installed on a motorized line scanner (Spectral Imaging Ltd.) to obtain a second spatial dimension. The camera settings and the control of the motorized line scanner were adapted using the SpectralCube software (Version 3.62, 2000, Spectral Imaging Ltd.). Hyperspectral images were recorded in a dark chamber in order to realize constant and reproducible illumination and measurement conditions. Normalization of raw hyperspectral images was performed using the software ENVI 4.6+IDL 7.0 (EXELIS Visual Information Solutions, Boulder, CO, USA). Reflectance was calculated relative to a white reference bar and to dark current measurement.

Bottom Line: Hyperspectral imaging systems used in plant science or agriculture often have suboptimal signal-to-noise ratio in the blue region (400-500 nm) of the electromagnetic spectrum.Typically there are two principal reasons for this effect, the low sensitivity of the imaging sensor and the low amount of light available from the illuminating source.In plant science, the blue region contains relevant information about the physiology and the health status of a plant.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, National Taiwan University, No.1, Roosevelt Road, Sec.4, Taipei 10617, Taiwan. amahlein@uni-bonn.de.

ABSTRACT
Hyperspectral imaging systems used in plant science or agriculture often have suboptimal signal-to-noise ratio in the blue region (400-500 nm) of the electromagnetic spectrum. Typically there are two principal reasons for this effect, the low sensitivity of the imaging sensor and the low amount of light available from the illuminating source. In plant science, the blue region contains relevant information about the physiology and the health status of a plant. We report on the improvement in sensitivity of a hyperspectral imaging system in the blue region of the spectrum by using supplemental illumination provided by an array of high brightness light emitting diodes (LEDs) with an emission peak at 470 nm.

Show MeSH