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Review of Research Status and Development Trends of Wireless Passive LC Resonant Sensors for Harsh Environments.

Li C, Tan Q, Jia P, Zhang W, Liu J, Xue C, Xiong J - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: Measurement technology for various key parameters in harsh environments (e.g., high-temperature and biomedical applications) continues to be limited.Consequently, these devices have become the focus of many current research studies.The advantages and disadvantages of various sensor types are discussed, and prospects and challenges for future development of these sensors are presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Instrumentation Science & Dynamic Measurement, Ministry of Education, North University of China, Tai Yuan 030051, China. flanklichen@163.com.

ABSTRACT
Measurement technology for various key parameters in harsh environments (e.g., high-temperature and biomedical applications) continues to be limited. Wireless passive LC resonant sensors offer long service life and can be suitable for harsh environments because they can transmit signals without battery power or wired connections. Consequently, these devices have become the focus of many current research studies. This paper addresses recent research, key technologies, and practical applications relative to passive LC sensors used to monitor temperature, pressure, humidity, and harmful gases in harsh environments. The advantages and disadvantages of various sensor types are discussed, and prospects and challenges for future development of these sensors are presented.

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Implantable wireless passive LC pressure sensor for biomedical applications together with the experimental results.
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sensors-15-13097-f005: Implantable wireless passive LC pressure sensor for biomedical applications together with the experimental results.

Mentions: To achieve pressure monitoring in, e.g., eyes, blood vessels, abdominal aortic aneurysm, or brain, researchers have explored passive wireless biomedical pressure sensors. Numerous studies have investigated pressure sensors for biomedical applications, and the principle of LC resonance coupling is currently attracting intense attention [30,31,32,33]. Researchers at the University of Liverpool proposed a passive wireless pressure sensor fabricated using micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology and incorporating a biologically compatible waterproof material. The sensitivity of this sensor can reach 42.85 kHz/mmHg. Professor Y.C. Tai from the California Institute of Technology also demonstrated a wireless passive LC intraocular pressure (IOP) sensor based on parylene materials. The actual response of the sensor was evaluated in the eye of a rabbit. The results indicate that the sensitivity of the sensor can reach 205 kHz/mmHg with 1-mmHg resolution. Preliminary implementation of this sensor system has already been performed (Figure 5). In 2013, Professor G. Z. Chen proposed a capacitive contact lens sensor for continuous non-invasive IOP monitoring, which could track pressure variations over time with minimal lag. In addition, the IOP sensitivity of the sensor can reach up to 200 ppm/mmHg, and the linearity of the sensor is good, which can be up to 0.997, obtained in a porcine-eye test. In 2014, Professor J.B. Wang proposed a new differential transduction circuit based on the LC mutual inductance detection mechanism for gastrointestinal pressure monitoring, which is composed of a sensor capsule and a detection unit. The micro-pressure system can realize long-term monitoring stability, and the sensitivity can reach up to 0.2491 kHz/kPa [34,35,36].


Review of Research Status and Development Trends of Wireless Passive LC Resonant Sensors for Harsh Environments.

Li C, Tan Q, Jia P, Zhang W, Liu J, Xue C, Xiong J - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Implantable wireless passive LC pressure sensor for biomedical applications together with the experimental results.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4507668&req=5

sensors-15-13097-f005: Implantable wireless passive LC pressure sensor for biomedical applications together with the experimental results.
Mentions: To achieve pressure monitoring in, e.g., eyes, blood vessels, abdominal aortic aneurysm, or brain, researchers have explored passive wireless biomedical pressure sensors. Numerous studies have investigated pressure sensors for biomedical applications, and the principle of LC resonance coupling is currently attracting intense attention [30,31,32,33]. Researchers at the University of Liverpool proposed a passive wireless pressure sensor fabricated using micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology and incorporating a biologically compatible waterproof material. The sensitivity of this sensor can reach 42.85 kHz/mmHg. Professor Y.C. Tai from the California Institute of Technology also demonstrated a wireless passive LC intraocular pressure (IOP) sensor based on parylene materials. The actual response of the sensor was evaluated in the eye of a rabbit. The results indicate that the sensitivity of the sensor can reach 205 kHz/mmHg with 1-mmHg resolution. Preliminary implementation of this sensor system has already been performed (Figure 5). In 2013, Professor G. Z. Chen proposed a capacitive contact lens sensor for continuous non-invasive IOP monitoring, which could track pressure variations over time with minimal lag. In addition, the IOP sensitivity of the sensor can reach up to 200 ppm/mmHg, and the linearity of the sensor is good, which can be up to 0.997, obtained in a porcine-eye test. In 2014, Professor J.B. Wang proposed a new differential transduction circuit based on the LC mutual inductance detection mechanism for gastrointestinal pressure monitoring, which is composed of a sensor capsule and a detection unit. The micro-pressure system can realize long-term monitoring stability, and the sensitivity can reach up to 0.2491 kHz/kPa [34,35,36].

Bottom Line: Measurement technology for various key parameters in harsh environments (e.g., high-temperature and biomedical applications) continues to be limited.Consequently, these devices have become the focus of many current research studies.The advantages and disadvantages of various sensor types are discussed, and prospects and challenges for future development of these sensors are presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Instrumentation Science & Dynamic Measurement, Ministry of Education, North University of China, Tai Yuan 030051, China. flanklichen@163.com.

ABSTRACT
Measurement technology for various key parameters in harsh environments (e.g., high-temperature and biomedical applications) continues to be limited. Wireless passive LC resonant sensors offer long service life and can be suitable for harsh environments because they can transmit signals without battery power or wired connections. Consequently, these devices have become the focus of many current research studies. This paper addresses recent research, key technologies, and practical applications relative to passive LC sensors used to monitor temperature, pressure, humidity, and harmful gases in harsh environments. The advantages and disadvantages of various sensor types are discussed, and prospects and challenges for future development of these sensors are presented.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus