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A Review of Membrane-Based Biosensors for Pathogen Detection.

van den Hurk R, Evoy S - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: Biosensors are of increasing interest for the detection of bacterial pathogens in many applications such as human, animal and plant health, as well as food and water safety.This review focuses on membrane materials, their associated biosensing applications, chemical linking procedures, and transduction mechanisms.The sensitivity of membrane biosensors is discussed, and the state of the field is evaluated and summarized.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta Edmonton, Alberta, AB T6G 2V4, Canada. remko@ualberta.ca.

ABSTRACT
Biosensors are of increasing interest for the detection of bacterial pathogens in many applications such as human, animal and plant health, as well as food and water safety. Membranes and membrane-like structures have been integral part of several pathogen detection platforms. Such structures may serve as simple mechanical support, function as a part of the transduction mechanism, may be used to filter out or concentrate pathogens, and may be engineered to specifically house active proteins. This review focuses on membrane materials, their associated biosensing applications, chemical linking procedures, and transduction mechanisms. The sensitivity of membrane biosensors is discussed, and the state of the field is evaluated and summarized.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Schematic of the biosensor structure and membrane assembly consistingof cellulose application and absorption pads and electrospun cellulose nitratecapture pad; (B) Detection scheme of the lateral flow immunosensor based on theantibody-functionalized electrospun capture membrane. With permission from [59].
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sensors-15-14045-f006: (A) Schematic of the biosensor structure and membrane assembly consistingof cellulose application and absorption pads and electrospun cellulose nitratecapture pad; (B) Detection scheme of the lateral flow immunosensor based on theantibody-functionalized electrospun capture membrane. With permission from [59].

Mentions: Another more unusual transduction method is based on the use of antibodies conjugated to conductive materials to close an electrical circuit. In this approach, pathogens are first immobilized on membranes. The device is then exposed to conductive polyaniline- [91] or iron oxide nanoparticle- [48] conjugated antibodies which will specifically bind to the target and close the electrical circuit. The change in resistance and conductance, respectively, were used to quantify the pathogens. In different papers, polyaniline and iron oxide nanoparticle -conjugated antibodies were used to concentrate the bacteria and viruses using magnetic separation. The antibody covered bacteria and viruses were then bound to nitrocellulose nanofilament membranes using secondary antibodies, and the change in resistivity was used to determine the concentration of bacteria or viruses [59,60]. This sensor’s operation is shown in Figure 6.


A Review of Membrane-Based Biosensors for Pathogen Detection.

van den Hurk R, Evoy S - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

(A) Schematic of the biosensor structure and membrane assembly consistingof cellulose application and absorption pads and electrospun cellulose nitratecapture pad; (B) Detection scheme of the lateral flow immunosensor based on theantibody-functionalized electrospun capture membrane. With permission from [59].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4507637&req=5

sensors-15-14045-f006: (A) Schematic of the biosensor structure and membrane assembly consistingof cellulose application and absorption pads and electrospun cellulose nitratecapture pad; (B) Detection scheme of the lateral flow immunosensor based on theantibody-functionalized electrospun capture membrane. With permission from [59].
Mentions: Another more unusual transduction method is based on the use of antibodies conjugated to conductive materials to close an electrical circuit. In this approach, pathogens are first immobilized on membranes. The device is then exposed to conductive polyaniline- [91] or iron oxide nanoparticle- [48] conjugated antibodies which will specifically bind to the target and close the electrical circuit. The change in resistance and conductance, respectively, were used to quantify the pathogens. In different papers, polyaniline and iron oxide nanoparticle -conjugated antibodies were used to concentrate the bacteria and viruses using magnetic separation. The antibody covered bacteria and viruses were then bound to nitrocellulose nanofilament membranes using secondary antibodies, and the change in resistivity was used to determine the concentration of bacteria or viruses [59,60]. This sensor’s operation is shown in Figure 6.

Bottom Line: Biosensors are of increasing interest for the detection of bacterial pathogens in many applications such as human, animal and plant health, as well as food and water safety.This review focuses on membrane materials, their associated biosensing applications, chemical linking procedures, and transduction mechanisms.The sensitivity of membrane biosensors is discussed, and the state of the field is evaluated and summarized.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta Edmonton, Alberta, AB T6G 2V4, Canada. remko@ualberta.ca.

ABSTRACT
Biosensors are of increasing interest for the detection of bacterial pathogens in many applications such as human, animal and plant health, as well as food and water safety. Membranes and membrane-like structures have been integral part of several pathogen detection platforms. Such structures may serve as simple mechanical support, function as a part of the transduction mechanism, may be used to filter out or concentrate pathogens, and may be engineered to specifically house active proteins. This review focuses on membrane materials, their associated biosensing applications, chemical linking procedures, and transduction mechanisms. The sensitivity of membrane biosensors is discussed, and the state of the field is evaluated and summarized.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus