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A Review of Membrane-Based Biosensors for Pathogen Detection.

van den Hurk R, Evoy S - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: Biosensors are of increasing interest for the detection of bacterial pathogens in many applications such as human, animal and plant health, as well as food and water safety.This review focuses on membrane materials, their associated biosensing applications, chemical linking procedures, and transduction mechanisms.The sensitivity of membrane biosensors is discussed, and the state of the field is evaluated and summarized.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta Edmonton, Alberta, AB T6G 2V4, Canada. remko@ualberta.ca.

ABSTRACT
Biosensors are of increasing interest for the detection of bacterial pathogens in many applications such as human, animal and plant health, as well as food and water safety. Membranes and membrane-like structures have been integral part of several pathogen detection platforms. Such structures may serve as simple mechanical support, function as a part of the transduction mechanism, may be used to filter out or concentrate pathogens, and may be engineered to specifically house active proteins. This review focuses on membrane materials, their associated biosensing applications, chemical linking procedures, and transduction mechanisms. The sensitivity of membrane biosensors is discussed, and the state of the field is evaluated and summarized.

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A complex DNA hybridization scheme. A bis-PNA DNA structure was used to specifically detect dsDNA from a pathogen. The mass change from this interaction is small however. In order to improve the detector sensitivity, single stranded DNA (ssDNA) linked to protein RecA was used to amplify the mass change while maintaining specificity as the ssDNA hybridizes only with the complex DNA structure already formed on the sensor surface. With permission from [43].
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sensors-15-14045-f003: A complex DNA hybridization scheme. A bis-PNA DNA structure was used to specifically detect dsDNA from a pathogen. The mass change from this interaction is small however. In order to improve the detector sensitivity, single stranded DNA (ssDNA) linked to protein RecA was used to amplify the mass change while maintaining specificity as the ssDNA hybridizes only with the complex DNA structure already formed on the sensor surface. With permission from [43].

Mentions: Some of the nucleic acid hybridization schemes were more complex than others, however. In one case a more complex DNA structure called a bis-peptide nucleic acid (PNA) was used, which involved a looped complementary DNA structure. This structure undergoes hybridization with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) from the pathogen, and a single stranded DNA probe linked to a RecA protein which is used to increase the biosensor sensitivity [43] (Figure 3). Another interesting method to increase sensitivity was through the use of short sensing DNA probes which were used to detect longer strands of pathogen DNA. The sensitivity was then increased by using PCR to extend the probe DNA to the length of the pathogen DNA [36].


A Review of Membrane-Based Biosensors for Pathogen Detection.

van den Hurk R, Evoy S - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

A complex DNA hybridization scheme. A bis-PNA DNA structure was used to specifically detect dsDNA from a pathogen. The mass change from this interaction is small however. In order to improve the detector sensitivity, single stranded DNA (ssDNA) linked to protein RecA was used to amplify the mass change while maintaining specificity as the ssDNA hybridizes only with the complex DNA structure already formed on the sensor surface. With permission from [43].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4507637&req=5

sensors-15-14045-f003: A complex DNA hybridization scheme. A bis-PNA DNA structure was used to specifically detect dsDNA from a pathogen. The mass change from this interaction is small however. In order to improve the detector sensitivity, single stranded DNA (ssDNA) linked to protein RecA was used to amplify the mass change while maintaining specificity as the ssDNA hybridizes only with the complex DNA structure already formed on the sensor surface. With permission from [43].
Mentions: Some of the nucleic acid hybridization schemes were more complex than others, however. In one case a more complex DNA structure called a bis-peptide nucleic acid (PNA) was used, which involved a looped complementary DNA structure. This structure undergoes hybridization with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) from the pathogen, and a single stranded DNA probe linked to a RecA protein which is used to increase the biosensor sensitivity [43] (Figure 3). Another interesting method to increase sensitivity was through the use of short sensing DNA probes which were used to detect longer strands of pathogen DNA. The sensitivity was then increased by using PCR to extend the probe DNA to the length of the pathogen DNA [36].

Bottom Line: Biosensors are of increasing interest for the detection of bacterial pathogens in many applications such as human, animal and plant health, as well as food and water safety.This review focuses on membrane materials, their associated biosensing applications, chemical linking procedures, and transduction mechanisms.The sensitivity of membrane biosensors is discussed, and the state of the field is evaluated and summarized.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta Edmonton, Alberta, AB T6G 2V4, Canada. remko@ualberta.ca.

ABSTRACT
Biosensors are of increasing interest for the detection of bacterial pathogens in many applications such as human, animal and plant health, as well as food and water safety. Membranes and membrane-like structures have been integral part of several pathogen detection platforms. Such structures may serve as simple mechanical support, function as a part of the transduction mechanism, may be used to filter out or concentrate pathogens, and may be engineered to specifically house active proteins. This review focuses on membrane materials, their associated biosensing applications, chemical linking procedures, and transduction mechanisms. The sensitivity of membrane biosensors is discussed, and the state of the field is evaluated and summarized.

Show MeSH