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DNA-Based Nanobiosensors as an Emerging Platform for Detection of Disease.

Abu-Salah KM, Zourob MM, Mouffouk F, Alrokayan SA, Alaamery MA, Ansari AA - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: Up-to-date results suggest that DNA-based nanobiosensors could be used effectively to provide simple, fast, cost-effective, sensitive and specific detection of some genetic, cancer, and infectious diseases.In addition, they could potentially be used as a platform to detect immunodeficiency, and neurological and other diseases.We discuss recent trends and applications of new strategies for DNA-based nanobiosensors, and emphasize the challenges in translating basic research to the clinical laboratory.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Chair for Medical Applications of Nanomaterials, King Saud University, PO Box 2454, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia. k_abusalah@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Detection of disease at an early stage is one of the biggest challenges in medicine. Different disciplines of science are working together in this regard. The goal of nanodiagnostics is to provide more accurate tools for earlier diagnosis, to reduce cost and to simplify healthcare delivery of effective and personalized medicine, especially with regard to chronic diseases (e.g., diabetes and cardiovascular diseases) that have high healthcare costs. Up-to-date results suggest that DNA-based nanobiosensors could be used effectively to provide simple, fast, cost-effective, sensitive and specific detection of some genetic, cancer, and infectious diseases. In addition, they could potentially be used as a platform to detect immunodeficiency, and neurological and other diseases. This review examines different types of DNA-based nanobiosensors, the basic principles upon which they are based and their advantages and potential in diagnosis of acute and chronic diseases. We discuss recent trends and applications of new strategies for DNA-based nanobiosensors, and emphasize the challenges in translating basic research to the clinical laboratory.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A schematic diagram shows basic biosensor assembly with a biological recognition element, transducer, and processor.
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sensors-15-14539-f001: A schematic diagram shows basic biosensor assembly with a biological recognition element, transducer, and processor.

Mentions: A biosensor is a device that detects, transmits and records the information on a biological analyte. Examples of analytes include nucleic acids (DNA, RNA), proteins such as enzymes, antibodies and antigens, or other biological component such as glucose. A basic biosensor assembly includes a biological recognition element, transducer, and processor (Figure 1).


DNA-Based Nanobiosensors as an Emerging Platform for Detection of Disease.

Abu-Salah KM, Zourob MM, Mouffouk F, Alrokayan SA, Alaamery MA, Ansari AA - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

A schematic diagram shows basic biosensor assembly with a biological recognition element, transducer, and processor.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4507582&req=5

sensors-15-14539-f001: A schematic diagram shows basic biosensor assembly with a biological recognition element, transducer, and processor.
Mentions: A biosensor is a device that detects, transmits and records the information on a biological analyte. Examples of analytes include nucleic acids (DNA, RNA), proteins such as enzymes, antibodies and antigens, or other biological component such as glucose. A basic biosensor assembly includes a biological recognition element, transducer, and processor (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Up-to-date results suggest that DNA-based nanobiosensors could be used effectively to provide simple, fast, cost-effective, sensitive and specific detection of some genetic, cancer, and infectious diseases.In addition, they could potentially be used as a platform to detect immunodeficiency, and neurological and other diseases.We discuss recent trends and applications of new strategies for DNA-based nanobiosensors, and emphasize the challenges in translating basic research to the clinical laboratory.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Chair for Medical Applications of Nanomaterials, King Saud University, PO Box 2454, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia. k_abusalah@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Detection of disease at an early stage is one of the biggest challenges in medicine. Different disciplines of science are working together in this regard. The goal of nanodiagnostics is to provide more accurate tools for earlier diagnosis, to reduce cost and to simplify healthcare delivery of effective and personalized medicine, especially with regard to chronic diseases (e.g., diabetes and cardiovascular diseases) that have high healthcare costs. Up-to-date results suggest that DNA-based nanobiosensors could be used effectively to provide simple, fast, cost-effective, sensitive and specific detection of some genetic, cancer, and infectious diseases. In addition, they could potentially be used as a platform to detect immunodeficiency, and neurological and other diseases. This review examines different types of DNA-based nanobiosensors, the basic principles upon which they are based and their advantages and potential in diagnosis of acute and chronic diseases. We discuss recent trends and applications of new strategies for DNA-based nanobiosensors, and emphasize the challenges in translating basic research to the clinical laboratory.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus