Limits...
Effect of rosemary essential oil and modified-atmosphere packaging (MAP) on meat quality and survival of pathogens in poultry fillets.

Kahraman T, Issa G, Bingol EB, Kahraman BB, Dumen E - Braz. J. Microbiol. (2015)

Bottom Line: The results showed that adding 0.2% REO to poultry fillets did not reduce the size of the population of S.However, REO treatment significantly decreased the L* (lightness) value and increased the a* (redness) value of stored fillets, and adding REO in combination with MAP reduced the level of lipid oxidation.In conclusion, in a suitable combination, REO can be applied to improve the quality of meat, but further studies should be conducted to determine the appropriate commercial level for different meat products.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Istanbul University, Department of Food Hygiene and Technology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey, Department of Food Hygiene and Technology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
The effect of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) essential oil (REO) and modified-atmosphere packaging (MAP) on the survival of certain pathogens (Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes) in poultry fillets and on their meat quality during 7 days of refrigerated storage were investigated. Because REO at 0.05% and 0.1% had weak antibacterial activity and REO at 0.3%, 0.5% and 1.0% imparted unacceptable organoleptic properties, only REO at 0.2% was used to treat the poultry meat. The results showed that adding 0.2% REO to poultry fillets did not reduce the size of the population of S. Typhimurium and L. monocytogenes. However, REO treatment significantly decreased the L* (lightness) value and increased the a* (redness) value of stored fillets, and adding REO in combination with MAP reduced the level of lipid oxidation. In conclusion, in a suitable combination, REO can be applied to improve the quality of meat, but further studies should be conducted to determine the appropriate commercial level for different meat products.

No MeSH data available.


Effect of the REO on the survival of S. Typhimurium inTSB.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4507556&req=5

f01: Effect of the REO on the survival of S. Typhimurium inTSB.

Mentions: The antibacterial activities of the REO as determined in TSB units are shown in Figures 1 and 2. In this study, the growth of S. Typhimurium andL. monocytogenes were inhibited by the REO at 0.2%, 0.3%, 0.5%and 1.0%. Consistent with this result, it has been reported that REO at variousconcentrations was effective in preventing the growth of food-borne pathogens, suchas S. Typhimurium (Hammeret al., 1999) and L. monocytogenes(Smith-Palmer et al.,1998). In another study, Sagdic and Ozcan(2003) reported that hydrosols of rosemary had no effect on the growth ofS. Typhimurium. These results showed that the antibacterialactivity of REO is affected by the composition of the oil and the strains ofbacteria tested. A relationship between the chemical composition of the tested oiland its antimicrobial activity has been reported (Dimitrijevic et al., 2007). Jiang et al. (2011) found that thebacteriostatic properties of REO appeared to be associated with its 1.8-cineole andĪ±-pinene contents.


Effect of rosemary essential oil and modified-atmosphere packaging (MAP) on meat quality and survival of pathogens in poultry fillets.

Kahraman T, Issa G, Bingol EB, Kahraman BB, Dumen E - Braz. J. Microbiol. (2015)

Effect of the REO on the survival of S. Typhimurium inTSB.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4507556&req=5

f01: Effect of the REO on the survival of S. Typhimurium inTSB.
Mentions: The antibacterial activities of the REO as determined in TSB units are shown in Figures 1 and 2. In this study, the growth of S. Typhimurium andL. monocytogenes were inhibited by the REO at 0.2%, 0.3%, 0.5%and 1.0%. Consistent with this result, it has been reported that REO at variousconcentrations was effective in preventing the growth of food-borne pathogens, suchas S. Typhimurium (Hammeret al., 1999) and L. monocytogenes(Smith-Palmer et al.,1998). In another study, Sagdic and Ozcan(2003) reported that hydrosols of rosemary had no effect on the growth ofS. Typhimurium. These results showed that the antibacterialactivity of REO is affected by the composition of the oil and the strains ofbacteria tested. A relationship between the chemical composition of the tested oiland its antimicrobial activity has been reported (Dimitrijevic et al., 2007). Jiang et al. (2011) found that thebacteriostatic properties of REO appeared to be associated with its 1.8-cineole andĪ±-pinene contents.

Bottom Line: The results showed that adding 0.2% REO to poultry fillets did not reduce the size of the population of S.However, REO treatment significantly decreased the L* (lightness) value and increased the a* (redness) value of stored fillets, and adding REO in combination with MAP reduced the level of lipid oxidation.In conclusion, in a suitable combination, REO can be applied to improve the quality of meat, but further studies should be conducted to determine the appropriate commercial level for different meat products.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Istanbul University, Department of Food Hygiene and Technology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey, Department of Food Hygiene and Technology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
The effect of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) essential oil (REO) and modified-atmosphere packaging (MAP) on the survival of certain pathogens (Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes) in poultry fillets and on their meat quality during 7 days of refrigerated storage were investigated. Because REO at 0.05% and 0.1% had weak antibacterial activity and REO at 0.3%, 0.5% and 1.0% imparted unacceptable organoleptic properties, only REO at 0.2% was used to treat the poultry meat. The results showed that adding 0.2% REO to poultry fillets did not reduce the size of the population of S. Typhimurium and L. monocytogenes. However, REO treatment significantly decreased the L* (lightness) value and increased the a* (redness) value of stored fillets, and adding REO in combination with MAP reduced the level of lipid oxidation. In conclusion, in a suitable combination, REO can be applied to improve the quality of meat, but further studies should be conducted to determine the appropriate commercial level for different meat products.

No MeSH data available.