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Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in children in eastern Turkey and molecular typing of isolates.

Ozbey G, Dogan Y, Demiroren K, Ozercan IH - Braz. J. Microbiol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Interestingly, all isolates from peptic ulcer patients were type III.In addition, we found low genetic variation among H. pylori isolates from children and no association between RFLP types and antral nodularity (p > 0.05).Additionally, we found that H. pylori isolates with specific RFLP types were predominant in different age groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Firat University, Vocational School of Health Services, Firat University, Elazig, Turkey, Vocational School of Health Services, Firat University, Elazig, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
The objectives of the present study were to determine Helicobacter pylori via culture, polymerase chain reaction and histopathological diagnosis in 101 children ranging in age from 4 to 18 years, to identify the association among restriction fragment length polymorphism types and clinical disease and to investigate the relationships among different isolates of H. pylori in different age groups. We observed a high prevalence of H. pylori infections in children between the ages of 13 and 18 (75.8%), while children aged 4 to 6 years had the lowest prevalence of infection (40%). H. pylori was detected in 30.7% (31 of 101), 66.3% (67 of 101) and 63.2% (60 of 95) of children as determined by culture methods, PCR and histological examination, respectively. H. pylori isolates with RFLP types I and III were the most common among children with antral nodularity, whereas RFLP types II and IV were the least detected types. Interestingly, all isolates from peptic ulcer patients were type III. Although our results show a high prevalence of H. pylori infections in the pediatric population in eastern Turkey, no association was identified between H. pylori infection with antral nodularity and recurring abdominal pain. In addition, we found low genetic variation among H. pylori isolates from children and no association between RFLP types and antral nodularity (p > 0.05). Additionally, we found that H. pylori isolates with specific RFLP types were predominant in different age groups.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

An agarose gel of PCR products of H. pylori isolatesfrom antral biopsy specimens (M: DNA Ladder (100 bp), P: H.pylori positive control, N: negative control, 1–8:H. pylori positive samples).
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f01: An agarose gel of PCR products of H. pylori isolatesfrom antral biopsy specimens (M: DNA Ladder (100 bp), P: H.pylori positive control, N: negative control, 1–8:H. pylori positive samples).

Mentions: Helicobacter pylori was detected in antral gastric biopsies byculture, PCR and histology in 30.7%, 66.3% and 63.2% of patients, respectively(Table 1). All H.pylori isolates examined generated the expected 294 bp fragment ofthe glmM gene (Figure 1).Patients 13 to 18 years of age showed the highest prevalence of infection(75.8%), while children 4 to 6 years of age had the lowest prevalence (40%)(Table 2). There was nostatistically significant difference in the prevalence of H.pylori between males (66.7%, 32/48) and females (67.9%, 36/53).H. pylori was detected by PCR in 76.4% (42/55) of casespresenting with antral nodularity, 46.2% (6/13) presenting with antralhyperemia, 50% (12/24) presenting with hyperemia in duodenal mucosa, 66.7% (2/3)presenting with duodenal ulcers and 83.3% (5/6) presenting with gastric ulcers(Table 3). Statistical analysis wasnot performed because the number of cases for a particular symptom or diagnosiswas relatively small. However, the number of cases of recurring abdominal painand antral nodularity were relatively high. H. pylori wasdetected in 68.9% (40/58) of cases reporting recurring abdominal pain, but nocorrelation was found between the prevalence of H. pyloriinfection with recurring abdominal pain and that with antral nodularity.


Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in children in eastern Turkey and molecular typing of isolates.

Ozbey G, Dogan Y, Demiroren K, Ozercan IH - Braz. J. Microbiol. (2015)

An agarose gel of PCR products of H. pylori isolatesfrom antral biopsy specimens (M: DNA Ladder (100 bp), P: H.pylori positive control, N: negative control, 1–8:H. pylori positive samples).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4507543&req=5

f01: An agarose gel of PCR products of H. pylori isolatesfrom antral biopsy specimens (M: DNA Ladder (100 bp), P: H.pylori positive control, N: negative control, 1–8:H. pylori positive samples).
Mentions: Helicobacter pylori was detected in antral gastric biopsies byculture, PCR and histology in 30.7%, 66.3% and 63.2% of patients, respectively(Table 1). All H.pylori isolates examined generated the expected 294 bp fragment ofthe glmM gene (Figure 1).Patients 13 to 18 years of age showed the highest prevalence of infection(75.8%), while children 4 to 6 years of age had the lowest prevalence (40%)(Table 2). There was nostatistically significant difference in the prevalence of H.pylori between males (66.7%, 32/48) and females (67.9%, 36/53).H. pylori was detected by PCR in 76.4% (42/55) of casespresenting with antral nodularity, 46.2% (6/13) presenting with antralhyperemia, 50% (12/24) presenting with hyperemia in duodenal mucosa, 66.7% (2/3)presenting with duodenal ulcers and 83.3% (5/6) presenting with gastric ulcers(Table 3). Statistical analysis wasnot performed because the number of cases for a particular symptom or diagnosiswas relatively small. However, the number of cases of recurring abdominal painand antral nodularity were relatively high. H. pylori wasdetected in 68.9% (40/58) of cases reporting recurring abdominal pain, but nocorrelation was found between the prevalence of H. pyloriinfection with recurring abdominal pain and that with antral nodularity.

Bottom Line: Interestingly, all isolates from peptic ulcer patients were type III.In addition, we found low genetic variation among H. pylori isolates from children and no association between RFLP types and antral nodularity (p > 0.05).Additionally, we found that H. pylori isolates with specific RFLP types were predominant in different age groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Firat University, Vocational School of Health Services, Firat University, Elazig, Turkey, Vocational School of Health Services, Firat University, Elazig, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
The objectives of the present study were to determine Helicobacter pylori via culture, polymerase chain reaction and histopathological diagnosis in 101 children ranging in age from 4 to 18 years, to identify the association among restriction fragment length polymorphism types and clinical disease and to investigate the relationships among different isolates of H. pylori in different age groups. We observed a high prevalence of H. pylori infections in children between the ages of 13 and 18 (75.8%), while children aged 4 to 6 years had the lowest prevalence of infection (40%). H. pylori was detected in 30.7% (31 of 101), 66.3% (67 of 101) and 63.2% (60 of 95) of children as determined by culture methods, PCR and histological examination, respectively. H. pylori isolates with RFLP types I and III were the most common among children with antral nodularity, whereas RFLP types II and IV were the least detected types. Interestingly, all isolates from peptic ulcer patients were type III. Although our results show a high prevalence of H. pylori infections in the pediatric population in eastern Turkey, no association was identified between H. pylori infection with antral nodularity and recurring abdominal pain. In addition, we found low genetic variation among H. pylori isolates from children and no association between RFLP types and antral nodularity (p > 0.05). Additionally, we found that H. pylori isolates with specific RFLP types were predominant in different age groups.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus