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Industrial wastewater as raw material for exopolysaccharide production by Rhizobium leguminosarum.

Sellami M, Oszako T, Miled N, Ben Rebah F - Braz. J. Microbiol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Growing in YMB, EPS production did not exceed 9.7 g/L obtained after 72 h of growth.In wastewater, the maximum EPS value reached 11.1 g/L obtained with the fish processing wastewater, after 72 h of growth.The highest EPS (42.4 g/L, after 96 h of culture) was obtained using a ratio of WWFP and WWOC2 of 50:50 (v:v).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire de Biochimie et de Génie Enzymatique des Lipases, Ecole Nationale d'Ingénieurs de Sfax, Université de Sfax, Sfax, Tunisia, Laboratoire de Biochimie et de Génie Enzymatique des Lipases, Ecole Nationale d'Ingénieurs de Sfax, Université de Sfax, Sfax, Tunisia.

ABSTRACT
The objective of this study was to evaluate the exopolysaccharide (EPS) production by Rhizobium leguminosarum cultivated in wastewater generated by oil companies (WWOC1 and WWOC2) and fish processing industry (WWFP). The results obtained in Erlenmeyer flasks indicated that the rhizobial strain grew well in industrial wastewater. Generally, wastewater composition affected the growth and the EPS production. WWFP allowed good bacterial growth similar to that obtained with the standard medium (YMB). During growth, various quantities of EPS were produced and yields varied depending on the media. Growing in YMB, EPS production did not exceed 9.7 g/L obtained after 72 h of growth. In wastewater, the maximum EPS value reached 11.1 g/L obtained with the fish processing wastewater, after 72 h of growth. The use of a mixture of the oil company wastewater (WWOC2) and the fish processing wastewater (WWFP) as culture medium affected not only the rhizobial strain growth, but also EPS production. The highest EPS (42.4 g/L, after 96 h of culture) was obtained using a ratio of WWFP and WWOC2 of 50:50 (v:v). Therefore, this work shows the ability of Rhizobium leguminosarum, growing in industrial wastewater as new economic medium, to produce EPS. This biopolymer could be applied in enormous biotechnological areas.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Growth (a) and EPS production (b) of R.leguminosarum grown in wastewater samples from oil company(WWOC2) and fish processing industry (WWFP) mixed at differentproportions.
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f02: Growth (a) and EPS production (b) of R.leguminosarum grown in wastewater samples from oil company(WWOC2) and fish processing industry (WWFP) mixed at differentproportions.

Mentions: The use of WWOC2 and WWFP mixed at different proportions influenced the rhizobialgrowth and EPS production (Figure 2, Table 3). The maximum cell count wasobtained using a ratio of WWOC2 and WWFP of 70:30 (v:v). The highest value of9.70 × 107 cfu/mL was reached after 48 h of culture. As far as theEPS production is concerned, a lag phase was observed for all samples and themixture containing 50% of both WWOC2 and WWFP increased nearly fourfold the EPSas compared with YMB, WWOC2 and WWFP tested separately. However, this value of42.4 g/L was obtained at 96 h with a cell count of 2.30 × 107 cfu/mL(Table 3). Except, for the mixture50:50 (v:v.), a decrease in EPS production was also noticed.


Industrial wastewater as raw material for exopolysaccharide production by Rhizobium leguminosarum.

Sellami M, Oszako T, Miled N, Ben Rebah F - Braz. J. Microbiol. (2015)

Growth (a) and EPS production (b) of R.leguminosarum grown in wastewater samples from oil company(WWOC2) and fish processing industry (WWFP) mixed at differentproportions.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4507532&req=5

f02: Growth (a) and EPS production (b) of R.leguminosarum grown in wastewater samples from oil company(WWOC2) and fish processing industry (WWFP) mixed at differentproportions.
Mentions: The use of WWOC2 and WWFP mixed at different proportions influenced the rhizobialgrowth and EPS production (Figure 2, Table 3). The maximum cell count wasobtained using a ratio of WWOC2 and WWFP of 70:30 (v:v). The highest value of9.70 × 107 cfu/mL was reached after 48 h of culture. As far as theEPS production is concerned, a lag phase was observed for all samples and themixture containing 50% of both WWOC2 and WWFP increased nearly fourfold the EPSas compared with YMB, WWOC2 and WWFP tested separately. However, this value of42.4 g/L was obtained at 96 h with a cell count of 2.30 × 107 cfu/mL(Table 3). Except, for the mixture50:50 (v:v.), a decrease in EPS production was also noticed.

Bottom Line: Growing in YMB, EPS production did not exceed 9.7 g/L obtained after 72 h of growth.In wastewater, the maximum EPS value reached 11.1 g/L obtained with the fish processing wastewater, after 72 h of growth.The highest EPS (42.4 g/L, after 96 h of culture) was obtained using a ratio of WWFP and WWOC2 of 50:50 (v:v).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire de Biochimie et de Génie Enzymatique des Lipases, Ecole Nationale d'Ingénieurs de Sfax, Université de Sfax, Sfax, Tunisia, Laboratoire de Biochimie et de Génie Enzymatique des Lipases, Ecole Nationale d'Ingénieurs de Sfax, Université de Sfax, Sfax, Tunisia.

ABSTRACT
The objective of this study was to evaluate the exopolysaccharide (EPS) production by Rhizobium leguminosarum cultivated in wastewater generated by oil companies (WWOC1 and WWOC2) and fish processing industry (WWFP). The results obtained in Erlenmeyer flasks indicated that the rhizobial strain grew well in industrial wastewater. Generally, wastewater composition affected the growth and the EPS production. WWFP allowed good bacterial growth similar to that obtained with the standard medium (YMB). During growth, various quantities of EPS were produced and yields varied depending on the media. Growing in YMB, EPS production did not exceed 9.7 g/L obtained after 72 h of growth. In wastewater, the maximum EPS value reached 11.1 g/L obtained with the fish processing wastewater, after 72 h of growth. The use of a mixture of the oil company wastewater (WWOC2) and the fish processing wastewater (WWFP) as culture medium affected not only the rhizobial strain growth, but also EPS production. The highest EPS (42.4 g/L, after 96 h of culture) was obtained using a ratio of WWFP and WWOC2 of 50:50 (v:v). Therefore, this work shows the ability of Rhizobium leguminosarum, growing in industrial wastewater as new economic medium, to produce EPS. This biopolymer could be applied in enormous biotechnological areas.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus