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Biodegradation of kerosene: Study of growth optimization and metabolic fate of P. janthinellum SDX7.

Khan SR, Nirmal JI, Kumar RN, Patel JG - Braz. J. Microbiol. (2015)

Bottom Line: The optimal concentration of 3% kerosene resulted in the least reduction of the metabolites of P. janthinellum such as carbohydrates, proteins and amino acids with optimal growth compared to 5% and 1% (v/v) kerosene doses on the 12(th) and 16(th) day of exposure.Phenols were found to be mounted by 43% to 66% at lower and higher concentrations during the experimental period.Fungal isolate P. janthinellum SDX7 was also tested for growth on various xenobiotic compounds.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Science and Technology, Institute of Science and Technology for Advanced Studies and Research, Gujarat, India, Department of Environmental Science and Technology, Institute of Science and Technology for Advanced Studies and Research, Gujarat, India.

ABSTRACT
Penicillum janthinellum SDX7 was isolated from aged petroleum hydrocarbon-affected soil at the site of Anand, Gujarat, India, and was tested for different pH, temperature, agitation and concentrations for optimal growth of the isolate that was capable of degrading upto 95%, 63% and 58% of 1%, 3% and 5% kerosene, respectively, after a period of 16 days, at optimal growth conditions of pH 6.0, 30 °C and 180 rpm agitation. The GC/MS chromatograms revealed that then-alkane fractions are easily degraded; however, the rate might be lower for branched alkanes, n-alkylaromatics, cyclic alkanes and polynuclear aromatics. The test doses caused a concentration-dependent depletion of carbohydrates of P. janthinellum SDX7 by 3% to 80%, proteins by 4% to 81% and amino acids by 8% to 95% upto 16 days of treatment. The optimal concentration of 3% kerosene resulted in the least reduction of the metabolites of P. janthinellum such as carbohydrates, proteins and amino acids with optimal growth compared to 5% and 1% (v/v) kerosene doses on the 12(th) and 16(th) day of exposure. Phenols were found to be mounted by 43% to 66% at lower and higher concentrations during the experimental period. Fungal isolate P. janthinellum SDX7 was also tested for growth on various xenobiotic compounds.

No MeSH data available.


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Metabolic content in P. janthinellum SDX7 treatedwith kerosene at different daily intervals.
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f06: Metabolic content in P. janthinellum SDX7 treatedwith kerosene at different daily intervals.

Mentions: Based on the inhibitory effects and growth arrest, the release of certainmetabolic products such as carbohydrates, amino acids and proteins was affectedat the earlier stage of kerosene applications, a result that is in agreementwith the study of Kumar et al.(2013) who studied the impact of PAH exposure on certaincyanobacterial species. The level of total carbohydrates decreased after 12 to16 days in all the concentrations of kerosene-treated isolate. After the12th day of exposure, carbohydrate content ranged from 0.6mgmL−15 to 2.24 mgmL−15 and was significantly reducedby 50%, 11% and 76%, whereas a higher level of reduction was encountered afterthe 16th day by 59%, 24% and 80% at 1%, 3% and 5% kerosene exposuresto P. janthinellum SDX7, respectively (Figure 6a). A similar reduction in the carbohydratecontent was recorded by Kumar etal. (2008) in nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria when treatedwith endosulfan. Protein content fluctuated from 1.44mgmL−15 to 3.78 mgmL−15 and was inhibited by 46%, 13%and 67% on the 12th day (Figure6b) and 70%, 48% and 81% after the 16th day, significantlyat 1%, 3% and 5%, respectively, of kerosene-treated P.janthinellum SDX7 isolate as shown by Babu et al. (2001) and Laxmi et al. (2007) inresponse to lindane and organophosphorus on certain cyanobacterial species. Atthe end of the experiment after the 16th day, the highest reductionof amino acids in P. janthinellum SDX7 (by 95%) was observedwhen treated with 5% kerosene relative to the control, which ranged from 0.05mgmL−15 to 0.4 mgmL−15 (Figure 6c). The optimal concentration of 3% kerosene showed lessimpact on the metabolite reduction. However, the greatest reduction observed atthe higher concentration of 5% followed by the lower concentration of 1%kerosene showed results quite well correlated with the findings of Standyk et al. (1971), whodepicted concentration-dependent inhibition of amino acids and proteins at anearlier stage based on inhibitory effects and growth arrest in fresh water algaein response to pesticide treatments.


Biodegradation of kerosene: Study of growth optimization and metabolic fate of P. janthinellum SDX7.

Khan SR, Nirmal JI, Kumar RN, Patel JG - Braz. J. Microbiol. (2015)

Metabolic content in P. janthinellum SDX7 treatedwith kerosene at different daily intervals.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4507531&req=5

f06: Metabolic content in P. janthinellum SDX7 treatedwith kerosene at different daily intervals.
Mentions: Based on the inhibitory effects and growth arrest, the release of certainmetabolic products such as carbohydrates, amino acids and proteins was affectedat the earlier stage of kerosene applications, a result that is in agreementwith the study of Kumar et al.(2013) who studied the impact of PAH exposure on certaincyanobacterial species. The level of total carbohydrates decreased after 12 to16 days in all the concentrations of kerosene-treated isolate. After the12th day of exposure, carbohydrate content ranged from 0.6mgmL−15 to 2.24 mgmL−15 and was significantly reducedby 50%, 11% and 76%, whereas a higher level of reduction was encountered afterthe 16th day by 59%, 24% and 80% at 1%, 3% and 5% kerosene exposuresto P. janthinellum SDX7, respectively (Figure 6a). A similar reduction in the carbohydratecontent was recorded by Kumar etal. (2008) in nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria when treatedwith endosulfan. Protein content fluctuated from 1.44mgmL−15 to 3.78 mgmL−15 and was inhibited by 46%, 13%and 67% on the 12th day (Figure6b) and 70%, 48% and 81% after the 16th day, significantlyat 1%, 3% and 5%, respectively, of kerosene-treated P.janthinellum SDX7 isolate as shown by Babu et al. (2001) and Laxmi et al. (2007) inresponse to lindane and organophosphorus on certain cyanobacterial species. Atthe end of the experiment after the 16th day, the highest reductionof amino acids in P. janthinellum SDX7 (by 95%) was observedwhen treated with 5% kerosene relative to the control, which ranged from 0.05mgmL−15 to 0.4 mgmL−15 (Figure 6c). The optimal concentration of 3% kerosene showed lessimpact on the metabolite reduction. However, the greatest reduction observed atthe higher concentration of 5% followed by the lower concentration of 1%kerosene showed results quite well correlated with the findings of Standyk et al. (1971), whodepicted concentration-dependent inhibition of amino acids and proteins at anearlier stage based on inhibitory effects and growth arrest in fresh water algaein response to pesticide treatments.

Bottom Line: The optimal concentration of 3% kerosene resulted in the least reduction of the metabolites of P. janthinellum such as carbohydrates, proteins and amino acids with optimal growth compared to 5% and 1% (v/v) kerosene doses on the 12(th) and 16(th) day of exposure.Phenols were found to be mounted by 43% to 66% at lower and higher concentrations during the experimental period.Fungal isolate P. janthinellum SDX7 was also tested for growth on various xenobiotic compounds.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Science and Technology, Institute of Science and Technology for Advanced Studies and Research, Gujarat, India, Department of Environmental Science and Technology, Institute of Science and Technology for Advanced Studies and Research, Gujarat, India.

ABSTRACT
Penicillum janthinellum SDX7 was isolated from aged petroleum hydrocarbon-affected soil at the site of Anand, Gujarat, India, and was tested for different pH, temperature, agitation and concentrations for optimal growth of the isolate that was capable of degrading upto 95%, 63% and 58% of 1%, 3% and 5% kerosene, respectively, after a period of 16 days, at optimal growth conditions of pH 6.0, 30 °C and 180 rpm agitation. The GC/MS chromatograms revealed that then-alkane fractions are easily degraded; however, the rate might be lower for branched alkanes, n-alkylaromatics, cyclic alkanes and polynuclear aromatics. The test doses caused a concentration-dependent depletion of carbohydrates of P. janthinellum SDX7 by 3% to 80%, proteins by 4% to 81% and amino acids by 8% to 95% upto 16 days of treatment. The optimal concentration of 3% kerosene resulted in the least reduction of the metabolites of P. janthinellum such as carbohydrates, proteins and amino acids with optimal growth compared to 5% and 1% (v/v) kerosene doses on the 12(th) and 16(th) day of exposure. Phenols were found to be mounted by 43% to 66% at lower and higher concentrations during the experimental period. Fungal isolate P. janthinellum SDX7 was also tested for growth on various xenobiotic compounds.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus