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Halotolerant bacteria in the São Paulo Zoo composting process and their hydrolases and bioproducts.

Oliveira LC, Ramos PL, Marem A, Kondo MY, Rocha RC, Bertolini T, Silveira MA, da Cruz JB, de Vasconcellos SP, Juliano L, Okamoto DN - Braz. J. Microbiol. (2015)

Bottom Line: These cultures were classified based on phylogenetic characteristics and comparative partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis as belonging to the genera Staphylococcus, Bacillus and Brevibacterium.The results of this study describe the ability of these halotolerant bacteria to produce some classes of hydrolases, namely, lipases, proteases, amylases and cellulases, and biopolymers.The strain characterized as of Brevibacterium avium presented cellulase and amylase activities up to 4 M NaCl and also produced EPSs and PHAs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Departamento de Biofísica, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Biofísica, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Halophilic microorganisms are able to grow in the presence of salt and are also excellent source of enzymes and biotechnological products, such as exopolysaccharides (EPSs) and polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). Salt-tolerant bacteria were screened in the Organic Composting Production Unit (OCPU) of São Paulo Zoological Park Foundation, which processes 4 ton/day of organic residues including plant matter from the Atlantic Rain Forest, animal manure and carcasses and mud from water treatment. Among the screened microorganisms, eight halotolerant bacteria grew at NaCl concentrations up to 4 M. These cultures were classified based on phylogenetic characteristics and comparative partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis as belonging to the genera Staphylococcus, Bacillus and Brevibacterium. The results of this study describe the ability of these halotolerant bacteria to produce some classes of hydrolases, namely, lipases, proteases, amylases and cellulases, and biopolymers. The strain characterized as of Brevibacterium avium presented cellulase and amylase activities up to 4 M NaCl and also produced EPSs and PHAs. These results indicate the biotechnological potential of certain microorganisms recovered from the composting process, including halotolerant species, which have the ability to produce enzymes and biopolymers, offering new perspectives for environmental and industrial applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Phylogenetic tree showing the position of the halotolerant isolates,as based on a partial 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison obtained byneighbor-joining and maximum-likelihood trees. The nucleotide sequenceaccession numbers were deposited in GenBank, as described in Materialand Methods.
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f02: Phylogenetic tree showing the position of the halotolerant isolates,as based on a partial 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison obtained byneighbor-joining and maximum-likelihood trees. The nucleotide sequenceaccession numbers were deposited in GenBank, as described in Materialand Methods.

Mentions: The isolated bacteria were obtained from the composting process during theturning stage (60th day). Eight out of eleven halophilic isolates in2.5 M NaCl from the composting process were subjected to a MALDI-TOF massspectrometry analysis, which indicated that the genera of all isolates were Grampositive, which was confirmed by Gram staining. These procedures ensured andconfirmed the purity of the isolates. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of eightstrains (> than 1300 bp) were compared with those previously deposited inGenBank. The neighbor-joining and maximum-likelihood trees showed the taxonomicposition of these strains, which were affiliated with Bacillus,Staphylococcus and Brevibacterium genera(Figure 2).


Halotolerant bacteria in the São Paulo Zoo composting process and their hydrolases and bioproducts.

Oliveira LC, Ramos PL, Marem A, Kondo MY, Rocha RC, Bertolini T, Silveira MA, da Cruz JB, de Vasconcellos SP, Juliano L, Okamoto DN - Braz. J. Microbiol. (2015)

Phylogenetic tree showing the position of the halotolerant isolates,as based on a partial 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison obtained byneighbor-joining and maximum-likelihood trees. The nucleotide sequenceaccession numbers were deposited in GenBank, as described in Materialand Methods.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4507525&req=5

f02: Phylogenetic tree showing the position of the halotolerant isolates,as based on a partial 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison obtained byneighbor-joining and maximum-likelihood trees. The nucleotide sequenceaccession numbers were deposited in GenBank, as described in Materialand Methods.
Mentions: The isolated bacteria were obtained from the composting process during theturning stage (60th day). Eight out of eleven halophilic isolates in2.5 M NaCl from the composting process were subjected to a MALDI-TOF massspectrometry analysis, which indicated that the genera of all isolates were Grampositive, which was confirmed by Gram staining. These procedures ensured andconfirmed the purity of the isolates. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of eightstrains (> than 1300 bp) were compared with those previously deposited inGenBank. The neighbor-joining and maximum-likelihood trees showed the taxonomicposition of these strains, which were affiliated with Bacillus,Staphylococcus and Brevibacterium genera(Figure 2).

Bottom Line: These cultures were classified based on phylogenetic characteristics and comparative partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis as belonging to the genera Staphylococcus, Bacillus and Brevibacterium.The results of this study describe the ability of these halotolerant bacteria to produce some classes of hydrolases, namely, lipases, proteases, amylases and cellulases, and biopolymers.The strain characterized as of Brevibacterium avium presented cellulase and amylase activities up to 4 M NaCl and also produced EPSs and PHAs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Departamento de Biofísica, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Biofísica, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Halophilic microorganisms are able to grow in the presence of salt and are also excellent source of enzymes and biotechnological products, such as exopolysaccharides (EPSs) and polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). Salt-tolerant bacteria were screened in the Organic Composting Production Unit (OCPU) of São Paulo Zoological Park Foundation, which processes 4 ton/day of organic residues including plant matter from the Atlantic Rain Forest, animal manure and carcasses and mud from water treatment. Among the screened microorganisms, eight halotolerant bacteria grew at NaCl concentrations up to 4 M. These cultures were classified based on phylogenetic characteristics and comparative partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis as belonging to the genera Staphylococcus, Bacillus and Brevibacterium. The results of this study describe the ability of these halotolerant bacteria to produce some classes of hydrolases, namely, lipases, proteases, amylases and cellulases, and biopolymers. The strain characterized as of Brevibacterium avium presented cellulase and amylase activities up to 4 M NaCl and also produced EPSs and PHAs. These results indicate the biotechnological potential of certain microorganisms recovered from the composting process, including halotolerant species, which have the ability to produce enzymes and biopolymers, offering new perspectives for environmental and industrial applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus