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Effects of age and blood pressure on the retinal arterial wall, analyzed using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy.

Arichika S, Uji A, Ooto S, Muraoka Y, Yoshimura N - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: WLR showed a strong correlation with age (r = 0.68, P < 0.0001), while outer diameter and inner diameter did not show significant correlation with age in the normal group (r = 0.13, P = 0.36 and r = -0.12, P =  .41, respectively).In conclusion, AOSLO provided noninvasive and reproducible arterial measurements.WLR is an early marker of morphological changes in the retinal arteries due to age and blood pressure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto 606-8507, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The wall-to-lumen ratio (WLR) of the vasculature is a promising early marker of retinal microvascular changes. Recently, adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) enabled direct and noninvasive visualization of the arterial wall. Using AOSLO, we analyzed the correlation between age and WLR in 51 normal subjects. In addition, correlations between blood pressure and WLR were analyzed in 73 subjects (51 normal subjects and 22 hypertensive patients). WLR showed a strong correlation with age (r = 0.68, P < 0.0001), while outer diameter and inner diameter did not show significant correlation with age in the normal group (r = 0.13, P = 0.36 and r = -0.12, P =  .41, respectively). In the normal and hypertensive groups, WLR showed a strong correlation with systolic and diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.60, P < 0.0001 and r = 0.65, P < 0.0001, respectively). In conclusion, AOSLO provided noninvasive and reproducible arterial measurements. WLR is an early marker of morphological changes in the retinal arteries due to age and blood pressure.

No MeSH data available.


Schematic of adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy.A spatial light modulator, based on the Liquid-Crystal-on-Silicon, and a wavefront sensor, based on the Shack-Hartmann sensor, was used to compensate for wavefront errors. The high-resolution imaging system was a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy with light emitted from an 840-nm superluminescent diode.
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f4: Schematic of adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy.A spatial light modulator, based on the Liquid-Crystal-on-Silicon, and a wavefront sensor, based on the Shack-Hartmann sensor, was used to compensate for wavefront errors. The high-resolution imaging system was a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy with light emitted from an 840-nm superluminescent diode.

Mentions: The AOSLO system (Canon Inc., Tokyo, Japan) is composed of the AO system, a high-resolution confocal SLO imaging system, and a wide-field imaging subsystem (Fig. 4). The resolution of our system is 2 μm/pixel. Video was recorded for 10 s per scan area at a rate of 32 frames/s. AOSLO imaging was performed with the optical focus on the layer for which the wall could be appropriately visualized. As Bennett et al. reported previously30, each subject’s axial length, obtained with an optical biometer (IOL Master; Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA), was used to convert the degree to the actual distance to the retina using AOSLO Retinal Image Analyzer software (ARIA; Canon Inc., Tokyo, Japan) dedicated to our prototype AOSLO31. A pulse oximeter (Oxypal Neo; NIHON KOHDEN, Japan) was attached to subjects’ earlobes for synchronizing cardiac pulsation and AOSLO video frames. The sphygmogram was digitized and recorded during the imaging session. The ARIA software detected extreme values from the sphygmogram and determined the relative cardiac cycle for each frame of the captured AOSLO video31.


Effects of age and blood pressure on the retinal arterial wall, analyzed using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy.

Arichika S, Uji A, Ooto S, Muraoka Y, Yoshimura N - Sci Rep (2015)

Schematic of adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy.A spatial light modulator, based on the Liquid-Crystal-on-Silicon, and a wavefront sensor, based on the Shack-Hartmann sensor, was used to compensate for wavefront errors. The high-resolution imaging system was a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy with light emitted from an 840-nm superluminescent diode.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4507481&req=5

f4: Schematic of adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy.A spatial light modulator, based on the Liquid-Crystal-on-Silicon, and a wavefront sensor, based on the Shack-Hartmann sensor, was used to compensate for wavefront errors. The high-resolution imaging system was a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy with light emitted from an 840-nm superluminescent diode.
Mentions: The AOSLO system (Canon Inc., Tokyo, Japan) is composed of the AO system, a high-resolution confocal SLO imaging system, and a wide-field imaging subsystem (Fig. 4). The resolution of our system is 2 μm/pixel. Video was recorded for 10 s per scan area at a rate of 32 frames/s. AOSLO imaging was performed with the optical focus on the layer for which the wall could be appropriately visualized. As Bennett et al. reported previously30, each subject’s axial length, obtained with an optical biometer (IOL Master; Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA), was used to convert the degree to the actual distance to the retina using AOSLO Retinal Image Analyzer software (ARIA; Canon Inc., Tokyo, Japan) dedicated to our prototype AOSLO31. A pulse oximeter (Oxypal Neo; NIHON KOHDEN, Japan) was attached to subjects’ earlobes for synchronizing cardiac pulsation and AOSLO video frames. The sphygmogram was digitized and recorded during the imaging session. The ARIA software detected extreme values from the sphygmogram and determined the relative cardiac cycle for each frame of the captured AOSLO video31.

Bottom Line: WLR showed a strong correlation with age (r = 0.68, P < 0.0001), while outer diameter and inner diameter did not show significant correlation with age in the normal group (r = 0.13, P = 0.36 and r = -0.12, P =  .41, respectively).In conclusion, AOSLO provided noninvasive and reproducible arterial measurements.WLR is an early marker of morphological changes in the retinal arteries due to age and blood pressure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto 606-8507, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The wall-to-lumen ratio (WLR) of the vasculature is a promising early marker of retinal microvascular changes. Recently, adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) enabled direct and noninvasive visualization of the arterial wall. Using AOSLO, we analyzed the correlation between age and WLR in 51 normal subjects. In addition, correlations between blood pressure and WLR were analyzed in 73 subjects (51 normal subjects and 22 hypertensive patients). WLR showed a strong correlation with age (r = 0.68, P < 0.0001), while outer diameter and inner diameter did not show significant correlation with age in the normal group (r = 0.13, P = 0.36 and r = -0.12, P =  .41, respectively). In the normal and hypertensive groups, WLR showed a strong correlation with systolic and diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.60, P < 0.0001 and r = 0.65, P < 0.0001, respectively). In conclusion, AOSLO provided noninvasive and reproducible arterial measurements. WLR is an early marker of morphological changes in the retinal arteries due to age and blood pressure.

No MeSH data available.