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Detection of Lyme Disease and Q Fever Agents in Wild Rodents in Central Italy.

Pascucci I, Di Domenico M, Dall'Acqua F, Sozio G, Cammà C - Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis. (2015)

Bottom Line: All samples (ticks and blood) were negative for F. tularensis and A. phagocytophilum.Data on the presence of B. burgdorferi s.l. are similar to that observed in other Mediterranean countries.Further studies including genotyping should be performed and species-specific differences between wild rodent reservoirs of Q fever and Lyme disease agents should be investigated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale dell'Abruzzo e del Molise "G. Caporale" , Teramo, Italy .

ABSTRACT
The maintenance of tick-borne disease agents in the environment strictly depends on the relationship between tick vectors and their hosts, which act as reservoirs for these pathogens. A pilot study aimed to investigate wild rodents as reservoirs for zoonotic tick-borne pathogens (Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.), Coxiella burnetii, Francisella tularensis, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum) was carried out in an area of Gran Sasso e Monti della Laga National Park (Abruzzi Region, central Italy), a wide protected area where, despite sporadic reports of infection in humans and animals, eco-epidemiological data on these diseases are still not available. Rodents were trapped and released at the capture site after the collection of feeding ticks and blood samples. In all, 172 ticks were collected; the most frequent species was Ixodes acuminatus (53%). Out of 88 tick pools, 11 resulted positive for C. burnetii and 13 for B. burgdorferi s.l.; the Borrelia afzelii genospecies was identified in one Ixodes ricinus tick collected from one Apodemus sp. rodent. Out of 143 blood samples, seven Apodemus spp. and five Myodes glareolus were positive for B. burgdorferi s.l. and two Apodemus spp. were positive for C. burnetii. All samples (ticks and blood) were negative for F. tularensis and A. phagocytophilum. This is the first report of B. burgdorferi s.l. in the environment for Abruzzi Region. Data on the presence of B. burgdorferi s.l. are similar to that observed in other Mediterranean countries. The present work is also the first report of C. burnetii in wild rodents in Italy. C. burnetii infection has been largely investigated in Italy in ruminant farms by serology and molecular methods, but information on ecology and on the wild cycle are still lacking. Further studies including genotyping should be performed and species-specific differences between wild rodent reservoirs of Q fever and Lyme disease agents should be investigated.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Collection of blood samples from rodents by FTA gene card (Whatman Inc., Florham Park, NJ).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


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f3: Collection of blood samples from rodents by FTA gene card (Whatman Inc., Florham Park, NJ).

Mentions: From February, 2008, to June, 2009, rodents were trapped during 15 capture sessions in four capture sites using a total of 47 Sherman (H.B. Sherman Inc., Tallahassee, FL) and LOT (Locasciulli Osvaldo Trap, Italy) live traps activated for two consecutive nights in each session (Fig. 2). Trapped animals were etherized, identified, and marked by ear-tag (Michel suture clips with an alphanumeric code), and biometric measures were recorded. A few drops of blood were collected from the tail vein and spotted on Whatman FTA gene cards (Whatman Inc., Florham Park, NJ) (Fig. 3). Ticks found on the animals were collected with tweezers and stored in 70% ethanol (Fig. 4). In the case of recapture of the same animals during subsequent sampling, inspection and tick collection were repeated each time. Blood samples from the rodents, instead, were collected only at the first capture. After these procedures the animals were released at the site of capture.


Detection of Lyme Disease and Q Fever Agents in Wild Rodents in Central Italy.

Pascucci I, Di Domenico M, Dall'Acqua F, Sozio G, Cammà C - Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis. (2015)

Collection of blood samples from rodents by FTA gene card (Whatman Inc., Florham Park, NJ).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4507354&req=5

f3: Collection of blood samples from rodents by FTA gene card (Whatman Inc., Florham Park, NJ).
Mentions: From February, 2008, to June, 2009, rodents were trapped during 15 capture sessions in four capture sites using a total of 47 Sherman (H.B. Sherman Inc., Tallahassee, FL) and LOT (Locasciulli Osvaldo Trap, Italy) live traps activated for two consecutive nights in each session (Fig. 2). Trapped animals were etherized, identified, and marked by ear-tag (Michel suture clips with an alphanumeric code), and biometric measures were recorded. A few drops of blood were collected from the tail vein and spotted on Whatman FTA gene cards (Whatman Inc., Florham Park, NJ) (Fig. 3). Ticks found on the animals were collected with tweezers and stored in 70% ethanol (Fig. 4). In the case of recapture of the same animals during subsequent sampling, inspection and tick collection were repeated each time. Blood samples from the rodents, instead, were collected only at the first capture. After these procedures the animals were released at the site of capture.

Bottom Line: All samples (ticks and blood) were negative for F. tularensis and A. phagocytophilum.Data on the presence of B. burgdorferi s.l. are similar to that observed in other Mediterranean countries.Further studies including genotyping should be performed and species-specific differences between wild rodent reservoirs of Q fever and Lyme disease agents should be investigated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale dell'Abruzzo e del Molise "G. Caporale" , Teramo, Italy .

ABSTRACT
The maintenance of tick-borne disease agents in the environment strictly depends on the relationship between tick vectors and their hosts, which act as reservoirs for these pathogens. A pilot study aimed to investigate wild rodents as reservoirs for zoonotic tick-borne pathogens (Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.), Coxiella burnetii, Francisella tularensis, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum) was carried out in an area of Gran Sasso e Monti della Laga National Park (Abruzzi Region, central Italy), a wide protected area where, despite sporadic reports of infection in humans and animals, eco-epidemiological data on these diseases are still not available. Rodents were trapped and released at the capture site after the collection of feeding ticks and blood samples. In all, 172 ticks were collected; the most frequent species was Ixodes acuminatus (53%). Out of 88 tick pools, 11 resulted positive for C. burnetii and 13 for B. burgdorferi s.l.; the Borrelia afzelii genospecies was identified in one Ixodes ricinus tick collected from one Apodemus sp. rodent. Out of 143 blood samples, seven Apodemus spp. and five Myodes glareolus were positive for B. burgdorferi s.l. and two Apodemus spp. were positive for C. burnetii. All samples (ticks and blood) were negative for F. tularensis and A. phagocytophilum. This is the first report of B. burgdorferi s.l. in the environment for Abruzzi Region. Data on the presence of B. burgdorferi s.l. are similar to that observed in other Mediterranean countries. The present work is also the first report of C. burnetii in wild rodents in Italy. C. burnetii infection has been largely investigated in Italy in ruminant farms by serology and molecular methods, but information on ecology and on the wild cycle are still lacking. Further studies including genotyping should be performed and species-specific differences between wild rodent reservoirs of Q fever and Lyme disease agents should be investigated.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus