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Teleradiotherapy Network: Applications and Feasibility for Providing Cost-Effective Comprehensive Radiotherapy Care in Low- and Middle-Income Group Countries for Cancer Patients.

Datta NR, Heuser M, Samiei M, Shah R, Lutters G, Bodis S - Telemed J E Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Globally, new cancer cases will rise by 57% within the next two decades, with the majority in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs).A teleradiotherapy network could enable centers to share and optimally utilize their resources, both infrastructure and staffing.The concept has been adopted in some LMICs and could also be used as a "service provider model," thereby reducing the investments to set up such a network.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1 Centre for Radiation Oncology, KSA-KSB, Kantonsspital Aarau , Aarau, Switzerland .

ABSTRACT
Globally, new cancer cases will rise by 57% within the next two decades, with the majority in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Consequently, a steep increase of about 40% in cancer deaths is expected there, mainly because of lack of treatment facilities, especially radiotherapy. Radiotherapy is required for more than 50% of patients, but the capital cost for equipment often deters establishment of such facilities in LMICs. Presently, of the 139 LMICs, 55 do not even have a radiotherapy facility, whereas the remaining 84 have a deficit of 61.4% of their required radiotherapy units. Networking between centers could enhance the effectiveness and reach of existing radiotherapy in LMICs. A teleradiotherapy network could enable centers to share and optimally utilize their resources, both infrastructure and staffing. This could be in the form of a three-tier radiotherapy service consisting of primary, secondary, and tertiary radiotherapy centers interlinked through a network. The concept has been adopted in some LMICs and could also be used as a "service provider model," thereby reducing the investments to set up such a network. Teleradiotherapy networks could be a part of the multipronged approach to address the enormous gap in radiotherapy services in a cost-effective manner and to support better accessibility to radiotherapy facilities, especially for LMICs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The teleradiotherapy network structure at Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute (SGPGI) of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India, designed by the Online Telemedicine Research Institute, India. Color images available online at www.liebertpub.com/tmj
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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f9: The teleradiotherapy network structure at Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute (SGPGI) of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India, designed by the Online Telemedicine Research Institute, India. Color images available online at www.liebertpub.com/tmj

Mentions: At the institution level, the Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India, was one of the first institutions to develop a teleradiotherapy network, in 2004. The project was funded by the Department of Science and Technology, Government of India, and the technical partner to the project was the Online Telemedicine Research Institute, Ahmedabad, India (Fig. 9).16 An audit carried out 2 years after the launching of the teleradiotherapy network and conducted between 2007 and 2009 showed that that the network provided a very effective media for teaching and training of the radiation oncology residents and other staff.16


Teleradiotherapy Network: Applications and Feasibility for Providing Cost-Effective Comprehensive Radiotherapy Care in Low- and Middle-Income Group Countries for Cancer Patients.

Datta NR, Heuser M, Samiei M, Shah R, Lutters G, Bodis S - Telemed J E Health (2015)

The teleradiotherapy network structure at Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute (SGPGI) of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India, designed by the Online Telemedicine Research Institute, India. Color images available online at www.liebertpub.com/tmj
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4507307&req=5

f9: The teleradiotherapy network structure at Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute (SGPGI) of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India, designed by the Online Telemedicine Research Institute, India. Color images available online at www.liebertpub.com/tmj
Mentions: At the institution level, the Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India, was one of the first institutions to develop a teleradiotherapy network, in 2004. The project was funded by the Department of Science and Technology, Government of India, and the technical partner to the project was the Online Telemedicine Research Institute, Ahmedabad, India (Fig. 9).16 An audit carried out 2 years after the launching of the teleradiotherapy network and conducted between 2007 and 2009 showed that that the network provided a very effective media for teaching and training of the radiation oncology residents and other staff.16

Bottom Line: Globally, new cancer cases will rise by 57% within the next two decades, with the majority in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs).A teleradiotherapy network could enable centers to share and optimally utilize their resources, both infrastructure and staffing.The concept has been adopted in some LMICs and could also be used as a "service provider model," thereby reducing the investments to set up such a network.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1 Centre for Radiation Oncology, KSA-KSB, Kantonsspital Aarau , Aarau, Switzerland .

ABSTRACT
Globally, new cancer cases will rise by 57% within the next two decades, with the majority in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Consequently, a steep increase of about 40% in cancer deaths is expected there, mainly because of lack of treatment facilities, especially radiotherapy. Radiotherapy is required for more than 50% of patients, but the capital cost for equipment often deters establishment of such facilities in LMICs. Presently, of the 139 LMICs, 55 do not even have a radiotherapy facility, whereas the remaining 84 have a deficit of 61.4% of their required radiotherapy units. Networking between centers could enhance the effectiveness and reach of existing radiotherapy in LMICs. A teleradiotherapy network could enable centers to share and optimally utilize their resources, both infrastructure and staffing. This could be in the form of a three-tier radiotherapy service consisting of primary, secondary, and tertiary radiotherapy centers interlinked through a network. The concept has been adopted in some LMICs and could also be used as a "service provider model," thereby reducing the investments to set up such a network. Teleradiotherapy networks could be a part of the multipronged approach to address the enormous gap in radiotherapy services in a cost-effective manner and to support better accessibility to radiotherapy facilities, especially for LMICs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus