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One-Stop Clinic Utilization in Plastic Surgery: Our Local Experience and the Results of a UK-Wide National Survey.

Gorman M, Coelho J, Gujral S, McKay A - Plast Surg Int (2015)

Bottom Line: The OSC improved 18-week waiting times, from a noncompliant mean of 80% to a compliant 95% average.This is despite associated improvements in waiting times, department capacity, and levels of high patient satisfaction.We offer our considerations and local experience instituting an OSC service.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Castle Hill Plastic Surgery Unit, Hull HU16 5JQ, UK.

ABSTRACT
Introduction. "See and treat" one-stop clinics (OSCs) are an advocated NHS initiative to modernise care, reducing cancer treatment waiting times. Little studied in plastic surgery, the existing evidence suggests that though they improve care, they are rarely implemented. We present our experience setting up a plastic surgery OSC for minor skin surgery and survey their use across the UK. Methods. The OSC was evaluated by 18-week wait target compliance, measures of departmental capacity, and patient satisfaction. Data was obtained from 32 of the 47 UK plastic surgery departments to investigate the prevalence of OSCs for minor skin cancer surgery. Results. The OSC improved 18-week waiting times, from a noncompliant mean of 80% to a compliant 95% average. Department capacity increased 15%. 95% of patients were highly satisfied with and preferred the OSC to a conventional service. Only 25% of UK plastic surgery units run OSCs, offering varying reasons for not doing so, 42% having not considered their use. Conclusions. OSCs are underutilised within UK plastic surgery, where a significant proportion of units have not even considered their benefit. This is despite associated improvements in waiting times, department capacity, and levels of high patient satisfaction. We offer our considerations and local experience instituting an OSC service.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

One-year review of 18 ww performance, showing the number of patients added to the departments' waiting list each week, the median trend represented by the orange dotted line, and weekly fluctuation in purple. The lower the number, the better the performance as patients are being treated in the OSC such that they are not added to the normal waiting list (i.e., standard non-OSC care pathway).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig5: One-year review of 18 ww performance, showing the number of patients added to the departments' waiting list each week, the median trend represented by the orange dotted line, and weekly fluctuation in purple. The lower the number, the better the performance as patients are being treated in the OSC such that they are not added to the normal waiting list (i.e., standard non-OSC care pathway).

Mentions: By measuring the number of patients added to departmental waiting lists each week, it was also possible to quantify the number of operating slots that were made available due to the OSC. Figure 5 shows that after the OSC was introduced (~week 40), the median number of additions to the waiting list dropped by approximately 18 patients per week. This means that 18 patients per week were being treated in the OSC that would have normally been added to the standard care pathway waiting list. This translates to the department having an increased capacity of approximately 15% or 72 minor procedural operating slots per month.


One-Stop Clinic Utilization in Plastic Surgery: Our Local Experience and the Results of a UK-Wide National Survey.

Gorman M, Coelho J, Gujral S, McKay A - Plast Surg Int (2015)

One-year review of 18 ww performance, showing the number of patients added to the departments' waiting list each week, the median trend represented by the orange dotted line, and weekly fluctuation in purple. The lower the number, the better the performance as patients are being treated in the OSC such that they are not added to the normal waiting list (i.e., standard non-OSC care pathway).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4506812&req=5

fig5: One-year review of 18 ww performance, showing the number of patients added to the departments' waiting list each week, the median trend represented by the orange dotted line, and weekly fluctuation in purple. The lower the number, the better the performance as patients are being treated in the OSC such that they are not added to the normal waiting list (i.e., standard non-OSC care pathway).
Mentions: By measuring the number of patients added to departmental waiting lists each week, it was also possible to quantify the number of operating slots that were made available due to the OSC. Figure 5 shows that after the OSC was introduced (~week 40), the median number of additions to the waiting list dropped by approximately 18 patients per week. This means that 18 patients per week were being treated in the OSC that would have normally been added to the standard care pathway waiting list. This translates to the department having an increased capacity of approximately 15% or 72 minor procedural operating slots per month.

Bottom Line: The OSC improved 18-week waiting times, from a noncompliant mean of 80% to a compliant 95% average.This is despite associated improvements in waiting times, department capacity, and levels of high patient satisfaction.We offer our considerations and local experience instituting an OSC service.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Castle Hill Plastic Surgery Unit, Hull HU16 5JQ, UK.

ABSTRACT
Introduction. "See and treat" one-stop clinics (OSCs) are an advocated NHS initiative to modernise care, reducing cancer treatment waiting times. Little studied in plastic surgery, the existing evidence suggests that though they improve care, they are rarely implemented. We present our experience setting up a plastic surgery OSC for minor skin surgery and survey their use across the UK. Methods. The OSC was evaluated by 18-week wait target compliance, measures of departmental capacity, and patient satisfaction. Data was obtained from 32 of the 47 UK plastic surgery departments to investigate the prevalence of OSCs for minor skin cancer surgery. Results. The OSC improved 18-week waiting times, from a noncompliant mean of 80% to a compliant 95% average. Department capacity increased 15%. 95% of patients were highly satisfied with and preferred the OSC to a conventional service. Only 25% of UK plastic surgery units run OSCs, offering varying reasons for not doing so, 42% having not considered their use. Conclusions. OSCs are underutilised within UK plastic surgery, where a significant proportion of units have not even considered their benefit. This is despite associated improvements in waiting times, department capacity, and levels of high patient satisfaction. We offer our considerations and local experience instituting an OSC service.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus