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Low fruit consumption and folate deficiency are associated with LINE-1 hypomethylation in women of a cancer-free population.

Agodi A, Barchitta M, Quattrocchi A, Maugeri A, Canto C, Marchese AE, Vinciguerra M - Genes Nutr (2015)

Bottom Line: Hypomethylation of long interspersed elements (LINE-1) has been associated with an increased risk of several cancers, although conflicting findings have also been observed.According to MDS, only 9.6 % of subjects achieved a high adherence to MD.Women whose consumption of fruit was below the median value (i.e., <201 gr/day) were 3.7 times more likely to display LINE-1 hypomethylation than women whose consumption was above the median value (OR 3.7; 95 % CI 1.4-9.5).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences and Advanced Technologies "GF Ingrassia", University of Catania, Via S. Sofia 87, 95121, Catania, Italy, agodia@unict.it.

ABSTRACT
Several dietary agents, such as micronutrient and non-nutrient components, the so-called bioactive food components, have been shown to display anticancer properties and influence genetic processes. The most common epigenetic change is DNA methylation. Hypomethylation of long interspersed elements (LINE-1) has been associated with an increased risk of several cancers, although conflicting findings have also been observed. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that a low adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MD) and folate deficiency may cause LINE-1 hypomethylation in blood leukocytes of healthy women, and thus genomic instability. One hundred and seventy-seven non-pregnant women were enrolled. Mediterranean diet score (MDS) and folate intake were calculated using a food frequency questionnaire. LINE-1 methylation level was measured by pyrosequencing analysis in three CpG sites of LINE-1 promoter. According to MDS, only 9.6 % of subjects achieved a high adherence to MD. Taking into account the use of supplements, there was a high prevalence of folate deficiency (73.4 %). Women whose consumption of fruit was below the median value (i.e., <201 gr/day) were 3.7 times more likely to display LINE-1 hypomethylation than women whose consumption was above the median value (OR 3.7; 95 % CI 1.4-9.5). Similarly, women with folate deficiency were 3.6 times more likely to display LINE-1 hypomethylation than women with no folate deficiency (OR 3.6; 95 % CI 1.1-12.1). A dietary pattern characterized by low fruit consumption and folate deficiency is associated with LINE-1 hypomethylation and with cancer risk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Variables included in the logistic regression analysis for hypomethylation levels. Adjusted for age, smoking status, daily energy intake, nutritional status and education level
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Fig1: Variables included in the logistic regression analysis for hypomethylation levels. Adjusted for age, smoking status, daily energy intake, nutritional status and education level

Mentions: The results of the regression analysis (Fig. 1) adjusting for the main confounders confirmed that women with folate deficiency were significantly more likely to show LINE-1 hypomethylation than women with adequate folate intake (OR 3.6; 95 % CI 1.0–12.1; p = 0.04). Considering the nine Mediterranean food groups of the MDS, women with lower fruit and nuts intake (i.e., below the median value, 201 gr/day) reported 3.7-fold increased hypomethylation risk compared with women with higher intake (OR 3.7; 95 % CI 1.4–9.9; p = 0.01).Fig. 1


Low fruit consumption and folate deficiency are associated with LINE-1 hypomethylation in women of a cancer-free population.

Agodi A, Barchitta M, Quattrocchi A, Maugeri A, Canto C, Marchese AE, Vinciguerra M - Genes Nutr (2015)

Variables included in the logistic regression analysis for hypomethylation levels. Adjusted for age, smoking status, daily energy intake, nutritional status and education level
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4504850&req=5

Fig1: Variables included in the logistic regression analysis for hypomethylation levels. Adjusted for age, smoking status, daily energy intake, nutritional status and education level
Mentions: The results of the regression analysis (Fig. 1) adjusting for the main confounders confirmed that women with folate deficiency were significantly more likely to show LINE-1 hypomethylation than women with adequate folate intake (OR 3.6; 95 % CI 1.0–12.1; p = 0.04). Considering the nine Mediterranean food groups of the MDS, women with lower fruit and nuts intake (i.e., below the median value, 201 gr/day) reported 3.7-fold increased hypomethylation risk compared with women with higher intake (OR 3.7; 95 % CI 1.4–9.9; p = 0.01).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Hypomethylation of long interspersed elements (LINE-1) has been associated with an increased risk of several cancers, although conflicting findings have also been observed.According to MDS, only 9.6 % of subjects achieved a high adherence to MD.Women whose consumption of fruit was below the median value (i.e., <201 gr/day) were 3.7 times more likely to display LINE-1 hypomethylation than women whose consumption was above the median value (OR 3.7; 95 % CI 1.4-9.5).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences and Advanced Technologies "GF Ingrassia", University of Catania, Via S. Sofia 87, 95121, Catania, Italy, agodia@unict.it.

ABSTRACT
Several dietary agents, such as micronutrient and non-nutrient components, the so-called bioactive food components, have been shown to display anticancer properties and influence genetic processes. The most common epigenetic change is DNA methylation. Hypomethylation of long interspersed elements (LINE-1) has been associated with an increased risk of several cancers, although conflicting findings have also been observed. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that a low adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MD) and folate deficiency may cause LINE-1 hypomethylation in blood leukocytes of healthy women, and thus genomic instability. One hundred and seventy-seven non-pregnant women were enrolled. Mediterranean diet score (MDS) and folate intake were calculated using a food frequency questionnaire. LINE-1 methylation level was measured by pyrosequencing analysis in three CpG sites of LINE-1 promoter. According to MDS, only 9.6 % of subjects achieved a high adherence to MD. Taking into account the use of supplements, there was a high prevalence of folate deficiency (73.4 %). Women whose consumption of fruit was below the median value (i.e., <201 gr/day) were 3.7 times more likely to display LINE-1 hypomethylation than women whose consumption was above the median value (OR 3.7; 95 % CI 1.4-9.5). Similarly, women with folate deficiency were 3.6 times more likely to display LINE-1 hypomethylation than women with no folate deficiency (OR 3.6; 95 % CI 1.1-12.1). A dietary pattern characterized by low fruit consumption and folate deficiency is associated with LINE-1 hypomethylation and with cancer risk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus