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The Hidden Burden of Dengue and Chikungunya in Chennai, India.

Rodríguez-Barraquer I, Solomon SS, Kuganantham P, Srikrishnan AK, Vasudevan CK, Iqbal SH, Balakrishnan P, Solomon S, Mehta SH, Cummings DA - PLoS Negl Trop Dis (2015)

Bottom Line: While only 1% of participants reported history of dengue and 20% of chikungunya, we found that 93% (95%CI 89-95%) of participants were seropositive to dengue virus, and 44% (95%CI 37-50%) to chikungunya.Seropositivity to dengue and chikungunya were significantly correlated, even after adjusting for individual and household factors.We estimate that 23% of the susceptible population gets infected by dengue each year, corresponding to approximately 228,000 infections.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: Dengue and chikungunya are rapidly expanding viruses transmitted by mosquitoes of the genus Aedes. Few epidemiological studies have examined the extent of transmission of these infections in South India despite an increase in the number of reported cases, and a high suitability for transmission.

Methods and findings: We conducted a household-based seroprevalence survey among 1010 individuals aged 5-40 years living in fifty randomly selected spatial locations in Chennai, Tamil Nadu. Participants were asked to provide a venous blood sample and to complete a brief questionnaire with basic demographic and daily activity information. Previous exposure to dengue and chikungunya was determined using IgG indirect ELISA (Panbio) and IgG ELISA (Novatec), respectively. We used this data to estimate key transmission parameters (force of infection and basic reproductive number) and to explore factors associated with seropositivity. While only 1% of participants reported history of dengue and 20% of chikungunya, we found that 93% (95%CI 89-95%) of participants were seropositive to dengue virus, and 44% (95%CI 37-50%) to chikungunya. Age-specific seroprevalence was consistent with long-tem, endemic circulation of dengue and suggestive of epidemic chikungunya transmission. Seropositivity to dengue and chikungunya were significantly correlated, even after adjusting for individual and household factors. We estimate that 23% of the susceptible population gets infected by dengue each year, corresponding to approximately 228,000 infections. This transmission intensity is significantly higher than that estimated in known hyperendemic settings in Southeast Asia and the Americas.

Conclusions: These results provide unprecedented insight into the very high transmission potential of dengue and chikungunya in Chennai and underscore the need for enhanced surveillance and control methods.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Age-specific seroprevalence to dengue and chikungunya with 95% confidence lines.Data was aggregated into 3-year groups. Dengue: Solid blue lines show the fit of the constant (dashed) and time varying model to the data. Chikungunya: Solid line shows the fit of a Loess smoother.
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pntd.0003906.g004: Age-specific seroprevalence to dengue and chikungunya with 95% confidence lines.Data was aggregated into 3-year groups. Dengue: Solid blue lines show the fit of the constant (dashed) and time varying model to the data. Chikungunya: Solid line shows the fit of a Loess smoother.

Mentions: Fig 4 shows the age-specific seroprevalence curves for both dengue and chikungunya. Dengue seroprevalence increased with age, from 70% (95%CI 50–86%) in children 5–8 years old to 99% (95%CI 97–100%) among adults 25 years of age or older. This pattern suggests endemic circulation of dengue over an extended period of time. In contrast, chikungunya seroprevalence was similar across individuals aged 5–40 years old (42%, 95%CI 3–47%). This pattern suggests that individuals aged 5–40 years in Chennai have experienced a similar cumulative hazard of infection.


The Hidden Burden of Dengue and Chikungunya in Chennai, India.

Rodríguez-Barraquer I, Solomon SS, Kuganantham P, Srikrishnan AK, Vasudevan CK, Iqbal SH, Balakrishnan P, Solomon S, Mehta SH, Cummings DA - PLoS Negl Trop Dis (2015)

Age-specific seroprevalence to dengue and chikungunya with 95% confidence lines.Data was aggregated into 3-year groups. Dengue: Solid blue lines show the fit of the constant (dashed) and time varying model to the data. Chikungunya: Solid line shows the fit of a Loess smoother.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4504702&req=5

pntd.0003906.g004: Age-specific seroprevalence to dengue and chikungunya with 95% confidence lines.Data was aggregated into 3-year groups. Dengue: Solid blue lines show the fit of the constant (dashed) and time varying model to the data. Chikungunya: Solid line shows the fit of a Loess smoother.
Mentions: Fig 4 shows the age-specific seroprevalence curves for both dengue and chikungunya. Dengue seroprevalence increased with age, from 70% (95%CI 50–86%) in children 5–8 years old to 99% (95%CI 97–100%) among adults 25 years of age or older. This pattern suggests endemic circulation of dengue over an extended period of time. In contrast, chikungunya seroprevalence was similar across individuals aged 5–40 years old (42%, 95%CI 3–47%). This pattern suggests that individuals aged 5–40 years in Chennai have experienced a similar cumulative hazard of infection.

Bottom Line: While only 1% of participants reported history of dengue and 20% of chikungunya, we found that 93% (95%CI 89-95%) of participants were seropositive to dengue virus, and 44% (95%CI 37-50%) to chikungunya.Seropositivity to dengue and chikungunya were significantly correlated, even after adjusting for individual and household factors.We estimate that 23% of the susceptible population gets infected by dengue each year, corresponding to approximately 228,000 infections.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: Dengue and chikungunya are rapidly expanding viruses transmitted by mosquitoes of the genus Aedes. Few epidemiological studies have examined the extent of transmission of these infections in South India despite an increase in the number of reported cases, and a high suitability for transmission.

Methods and findings: We conducted a household-based seroprevalence survey among 1010 individuals aged 5-40 years living in fifty randomly selected spatial locations in Chennai, Tamil Nadu. Participants were asked to provide a venous blood sample and to complete a brief questionnaire with basic demographic and daily activity information. Previous exposure to dengue and chikungunya was determined using IgG indirect ELISA (Panbio) and IgG ELISA (Novatec), respectively. We used this data to estimate key transmission parameters (force of infection and basic reproductive number) and to explore factors associated with seropositivity. While only 1% of participants reported history of dengue and 20% of chikungunya, we found that 93% (95%CI 89-95%) of participants were seropositive to dengue virus, and 44% (95%CI 37-50%) to chikungunya. Age-specific seroprevalence was consistent with long-tem, endemic circulation of dengue and suggestive of epidemic chikungunya transmission. Seropositivity to dengue and chikungunya were significantly correlated, even after adjusting for individual and household factors. We estimate that 23% of the susceptible population gets infected by dengue each year, corresponding to approximately 228,000 infections. This transmission intensity is significantly higher than that estimated in known hyperendemic settings in Southeast Asia and the Americas.

Conclusions: These results provide unprecedented insight into the very high transmission potential of dengue and chikungunya in Chennai and underscore the need for enhanced surveillance and control methods.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus