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Sedation With Propofol Has No Effect on Capsule Endoscopy Completion Rates: A Prospective Single-Center Study.

Gan HY, Weng YJ, Qiao WG, Chen ZY, Xu ZM, Bai Y, Gong W, Wan TM, Pan DS, Shi YS, Qiu AJ, Zhi FC - Medicine (Baltimore) (2015)

Bottom Line: Patients' satisfaction and pain scores were also recorded.Sedation with propofol had no significant effect on CE completion rates (83.3% sedation group vs 81.8% nonsedation group, P = 0.86) but was associated with increased SBTT (403.6 ± 160.3 sedation group vs 334.5 ± 134.4 nonsedation group, P = 0.006).The diagnostic yields in the sedation and nonsedation groups were 69.4% and 65.9%, respectively (P = 0.74).The median satisfaction scores were 8.6 in the sedation group and 3.5 in the nonsedation group (P < 0.001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: From the Department of Gastroenterology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China (H-YG, Y-JW, W-GQ, Z-YC, Z-MX, YB, WG, T-MW, D-SP, F-CZ); Department of Anesthesiology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China (Y-SS, A-JQ); and Department of Gastroenterology, Qingyuan City People's Hospital of Jinan University, Guangdong, China (H-YG).

ABSTRACT
Patients who need both capsule endoscopy (CE) and colonoscopy often undergo both examinations on the same day to avoid repeated bowel preparation and fasting. Sedation can relieve pain and is commonly used for colonoscopies but may influence the CE completion rate.To determine whether sedation with propofol influences the completion rate and small-bowel transit time (SBTT) of CE.From July 2014 to December 2014, patients (18-65 years old) who needed both CE and colonoscopy were assessed consecutively for enrollment in our study. Colonoscopies were performed with or without sedation based on patient preferences on the day of capsule ingestion. The completion rate, SBTT, and diagnostic yield of CEs were recorded. Patients' satisfaction and pain scores were also recorded.Sedation with propofol had no significant effect on CE completion rates (83.3% sedation group vs 81.8% nonsedation group, P = 0.86) but was associated with increased SBTT (403.6 ± 160.3 sedation group vs 334.5 ± 134.4 nonsedation group, P = 0.006). The diagnostic yields in the sedation and nonsedation groups were 69.4% and 65.9%, respectively (P = 0.74). The median satisfaction scores were 8.6 in the sedation group and 3.5 in the nonsedation group (P < 0.001). Median pain scores were 1.4 in the sedation group and 6.7 in the nonsedation group (P < 0.001).Sedation with propofol increased SBTT but had no effect on CE completion rates, suggesting that CE and colonoscopy with propofol can be performed on the same day (clinical trial registration number: ChiCTR-ONRC-14004866).

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Flow diagram illustrating the study design. CE = capsule endoscopy; NS = nonsedation.
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Figure 1: Flow diagram illustrating the study design. CE = capsule endoscopy; NS = nonsedation.

Mentions: A total of 468 patients underwent CEs between July 2014 and December 2014. Of these patients, 98 underwent CEs and colonoscopies on the same day. Of the 98 patients, 6 were excluded due to age restrictions, 9 were excluded based on additional exclusion criteria, and 3 refused to participate in the study. Therefore, 80 patients were ultimately enrolled, 36 of whom were assigned to the sedation group at their request (Figure 1). Our target sample size was reached.


Sedation With Propofol Has No Effect on Capsule Endoscopy Completion Rates: A Prospective Single-Center Study.

Gan HY, Weng YJ, Qiao WG, Chen ZY, Xu ZM, Bai Y, Gong W, Wan TM, Pan DS, Shi YS, Qiu AJ, Zhi FC - Medicine (Baltimore) (2015)

Flow diagram illustrating the study design. CE = capsule endoscopy; NS = nonsedation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4504626&req=5

Figure 1: Flow diagram illustrating the study design. CE = capsule endoscopy; NS = nonsedation.
Mentions: A total of 468 patients underwent CEs between July 2014 and December 2014. Of these patients, 98 underwent CEs and colonoscopies on the same day. Of the 98 patients, 6 were excluded due to age restrictions, 9 were excluded based on additional exclusion criteria, and 3 refused to participate in the study. Therefore, 80 patients were ultimately enrolled, 36 of whom were assigned to the sedation group at their request (Figure 1). Our target sample size was reached.

Bottom Line: Patients' satisfaction and pain scores were also recorded.Sedation with propofol had no significant effect on CE completion rates (83.3% sedation group vs 81.8% nonsedation group, P = 0.86) but was associated with increased SBTT (403.6 ± 160.3 sedation group vs 334.5 ± 134.4 nonsedation group, P = 0.006).The diagnostic yields in the sedation and nonsedation groups were 69.4% and 65.9%, respectively (P = 0.74).The median satisfaction scores were 8.6 in the sedation group and 3.5 in the nonsedation group (P < 0.001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: From the Department of Gastroenterology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China (H-YG, Y-JW, W-GQ, Z-YC, Z-MX, YB, WG, T-MW, D-SP, F-CZ); Department of Anesthesiology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China (Y-SS, A-JQ); and Department of Gastroenterology, Qingyuan City People's Hospital of Jinan University, Guangdong, China (H-YG).

ABSTRACT
Patients who need both capsule endoscopy (CE) and colonoscopy often undergo both examinations on the same day to avoid repeated bowel preparation and fasting. Sedation can relieve pain and is commonly used for colonoscopies but may influence the CE completion rate.To determine whether sedation with propofol influences the completion rate and small-bowel transit time (SBTT) of CE.From July 2014 to December 2014, patients (18-65 years old) who needed both CE and colonoscopy were assessed consecutively for enrollment in our study. Colonoscopies were performed with or without sedation based on patient preferences on the day of capsule ingestion. The completion rate, SBTT, and diagnostic yield of CEs were recorded. Patients' satisfaction and pain scores were also recorded.Sedation with propofol had no significant effect on CE completion rates (83.3% sedation group vs 81.8% nonsedation group, P = 0.86) but was associated with increased SBTT (403.6 ± 160.3 sedation group vs 334.5 ± 134.4 nonsedation group, P = 0.006). The diagnostic yields in the sedation and nonsedation groups were 69.4% and 65.9%, respectively (P = 0.74). The median satisfaction scores were 8.6 in the sedation group and 3.5 in the nonsedation group (P < 0.001). Median pain scores were 1.4 in the sedation group and 6.7 in the nonsedation group (P < 0.001).Sedation with propofol increased SBTT but had no effect on CE completion rates, suggesting that CE and colonoscopy with propofol can be performed on the same day (clinical trial registration number: ChiCTR-ONRC-14004866).

Show MeSH