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Insights Into Microcirculation Underlying Critical Limb Ischemia by Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography.

Liu JT, Chang CS, Su CH, Li CS - Medicine (Baltimore) (2015)

Bottom Line: Up to 82 cases that were excluded from neuralgia by radiologic imaging, electrodiagnostic electromyography, and nerve conduction velocity were enrolled in this study.Patients with systemic vascular diseases exhibited significantly higher perfusion difference than that of patients without these related diseases (P < 0.05), except for renal insufficiency (P = 0.134).Significant correlation was observed between perfusion difference and VAS score (r = -0.78; P < 0.0001; n = 82).In this study, we presented perfusion difference as a parameter for evaluating microcirculation, which cannot be detected by ultrasonography or angiography.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: From Department of Neurosurgery, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (J-TL, C-SC, C-HS, C-SL).

ABSTRACT
Perfusion difference is used as a parameter to evaluate microcirculation. This study aims to differentiate lower-limb perfusion insufficiency from neuropathy to prevent possible occurrence of failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS).Patients were retrospectively gathered from 134 FBSS cases diagnosed in the past 7 years. Up to 82 cases that were excluded from neuralgia by radiologic imaging, electrodiagnostic electromyography, and nerve conduction velocity were enrolled in this study. Perfusion difference was evaluated by single-photon emission computed tomography, and pain intensities were recorded via visual analog scale (VAS) score.Lower perfusion at the left leg comprises 51.2% (42 of 82) of the patients. The mean perfusion difference of the 82 patients was 0.86 ± 0.05 (range: 0.75-0.93). Patients with systemic vascular diseases exhibited significantly higher perfusion difference than that of patients without these related diseases (P < 0.05), except for renal insufficiency (P = 0.134). Significant correlation was observed between perfusion difference and VAS score (r = -0.78; P < 0.0001; n = 82).In this study, we presented perfusion difference as a parameter for evaluating microcirculation, which cannot be detected by ultrasonography or angiography.

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Correlation between perfusion difference and VAS pain score. Data were statistically assessed with Spearman's correlation coefficient, ranging from 1 for perfect correlation to −1 for inverse correlation (0 value indicates no correlation between perfusion difference and VAS score).
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Figure 3: Correlation between perfusion difference and VAS pain score. Data were statistically assessed with Spearman's correlation coefficient, ranging from 1 for perfect correlation to −1 for inverse correlation (0 value indicates no correlation between perfusion difference and VAS score).

Mentions: The patients with systemic vascular diseases (DM; 85.2 ± 4.3%, CAD; 85.3 ± 4.3%, HT; 85.3 ± 4.5%, HL; 84.9 ± 4.4%; RI; 86.3 ± 5.1%; P < 0.05) exhibited significantly higher perfusion difference than that of patients without these related diseases (90.5 ± 1.9%), except for renal insufficiency (RI; 86.3 ± 5.1%; P = 0.134). This finding suggests that perfusion difference can indicate systematic vascular diseases in previously diagnosed FBSS patients (Figure 2). To test the correlation of perfusion difference with pain intensities, we assessed the correlation analysis between the perfusion difference and VAS score. We observed a significant correlation between perfusion difference and VAS score (r = −0.78; P < 0.0001; n = 82), demonstrating that a lower perfusion difference indicates higher pain intensities (Figure 3).


Insights Into Microcirculation Underlying Critical Limb Ischemia by Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography.

Liu JT, Chang CS, Su CH, Li CS - Medicine (Baltimore) (2015)

Correlation between perfusion difference and VAS pain score. Data were statistically assessed with Spearman's correlation coefficient, ranging from 1 for perfect correlation to −1 for inverse correlation (0 value indicates no correlation between perfusion difference and VAS score).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4504599&req=5

Figure 3: Correlation between perfusion difference and VAS pain score. Data were statistically assessed with Spearman's correlation coefficient, ranging from 1 for perfect correlation to −1 for inverse correlation (0 value indicates no correlation between perfusion difference and VAS score).
Mentions: The patients with systemic vascular diseases (DM; 85.2 ± 4.3%, CAD; 85.3 ± 4.3%, HT; 85.3 ± 4.5%, HL; 84.9 ± 4.4%; RI; 86.3 ± 5.1%; P < 0.05) exhibited significantly higher perfusion difference than that of patients without these related diseases (90.5 ± 1.9%), except for renal insufficiency (RI; 86.3 ± 5.1%; P = 0.134). This finding suggests that perfusion difference can indicate systematic vascular diseases in previously diagnosed FBSS patients (Figure 2). To test the correlation of perfusion difference with pain intensities, we assessed the correlation analysis between the perfusion difference and VAS score. We observed a significant correlation between perfusion difference and VAS score (r = −0.78; P < 0.0001; n = 82), demonstrating that a lower perfusion difference indicates higher pain intensities (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Up to 82 cases that were excluded from neuralgia by radiologic imaging, electrodiagnostic electromyography, and nerve conduction velocity were enrolled in this study.Patients with systemic vascular diseases exhibited significantly higher perfusion difference than that of patients without these related diseases (P < 0.05), except for renal insufficiency (P = 0.134).Significant correlation was observed between perfusion difference and VAS score (r = -0.78; P < 0.0001; n = 82).In this study, we presented perfusion difference as a parameter for evaluating microcirculation, which cannot be detected by ultrasonography or angiography.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: From Department of Neurosurgery, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (J-TL, C-SC, C-HS, C-SL).

ABSTRACT
Perfusion difference is used as a parameter to evaluate microcirculation. This study aims to differentiate lower-limb perfusion insufficiency from neuropathy to prevent possible occurrence of failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS).Patients were retrospectively gathered from 134 FBSS cases diagnosed in the past 7 years. Up to 82 cases that were excluded from neuralgia by radiologic imaging, electrodiagnostic electromyography, and nerve conduction velocity were enrolled in this study. Perfusion difference was evaluated by single-photon emission computed tomography, and pain intensities were recorded via visual analog scale (VAS) score.Lower perfusion at the left leg comprises 51.2% (42 of 82) of the patients. The mean perfusion difference of the 82 patients was 0.86 ± 0.05 (range: 0.75-0.93). Patients with systemic vascular diseases exhibited significantly higher perfusion difference than that of patients without these related diseases (P < 0.05), except for renal insufficiency (P = 0.134). Significant correlation was observed between perfusion difference and VAS score (r = -0.78; P < 0.0001; n = 82).In this study, we presented perfusion difference as a parameter for evaluating microcirculation, which cannot be detected by ultrasonography or angiography.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus