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The French Connection: The First Large Population-Based Contact Survey in France Relevant for the Spread of Infectious Diseases.

Béraud G, Kazmercziak S, Beutels P, Levy-Bruhl D, Lenne X, Mielcarek N, Yazdanpanah Y, Boëlle PY, Hens N, Dervaux B - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Holidays and weekends reduced dramatically the number of contacts, and as proxies for school closure, reduced R0 by 33% and 28%, respectively.Despite no clear evidence for temporal variation, trends suggest that more studies are needed.Age and gender were found important determinants of the mixing patterns.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Médecine Interne et Maladies Infectieuses, Centre Hospitalier de Poitiers, Poitiers, France; EA2694, Université Droit et Santé Lille 2, Lille, France; Interuniversity Institute for Biostatistics and statistical Bioinformatics, Hasselt University, Hasselt, Belgium.

ABSTRACT

Background: Empirical social contact patterns are essential to understand the spread of infectious diseases. To date, no such data existed for France. Although infectious diseases are frequently seasonal, the temporal variation of contact patterns has not been documented hitherto.

Methods: COMES-F is the first French large-scale population survey, carried out over 3 different periods (February-March, April, April-May) with some participants common to the first and the last period. Participants described their contacts for 2 consecutive days, and reported separately on professional contacts when typically over 20 per day.

Results: 2033 participants reported 38 881 contacts (weighted median [first quartile-third quartile]: 8[5-14] per day), and 54 378 contacts with supplementary professional contacts (9[5-17]). Contrary to age, gender, household size, holidays, weekend and occupation, period of the year had little influence on the number of contacts or the mixing patterns. Contact patterns were highly assortative with age, irrespective of the location of the contact, and gender, with women having 8% more contacts than men. Although most contacts occurred at home and at school, the inclusion of professional contacts modified the structure of the mixing patterns. Holidays and weekends reduced dramatically the number of contacts, and as proxies for school closure, reduced R0 by 33% and 28%, respectively. Thus, school closures could have an important impact on the spread of close contact infections in France.

Conclusions: Despite no clear evidence for temporal variation, trends suggest that more studies are needed. Age and gender were found important determinants of the mixing patterns. Gender differences in mixing patterns might help explain gender differences in the epidemiology of infectious diseases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Degree distribution comparing number of contacts according to weekends and holidays in children (3–18y) and adults, with density of number of contact.Similar graph with frequency of number of contact is provided as supplementary material S3 Fig.
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pone.0133203.g005: Degree distribution comparing number of contacts according to weekends and holidays in children (3–18y) and adults, with density of number of contact.Similar graph with frequency of number of contact is provided as supplementary material S3 Fig.

Mentions: During weekends and holidays the number of all contacts decreased respectively by 21% [14%;27%] and 21% [16%;26%] (Table 1), and by 16% [8%;23%] and 19% [13%;25%] for physical contacts The impact was different between children and adults (Fig 5).


The French Connection: The First Large Population-Based Contact Survey in France Relevant for the Spread of Infectious Diseases.

Béraud G, Kazmercziak S, Beutels P, Levy-Bruhl D, Lenne X, Mielcarek N, Yazdanpanah Y, Boëlle PY, Hens N, Dervaux B - PLoS ONE (2015)

Degree distribution comparing number of contacts according to weekends and holidays in children (3–18y) and adults, with density of number of contact.Similar graph with frequency of number of contact is provided as supplementary material S3 Fig.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4503306&req=5

pone.0133203.g005: Degree distribution comparing number of contacts according to weekends and holidays in children (3–18y) and adults, with density of number of contact.Similar graph with frequency of number of contact is provided as supplementary material S3 Fig.
Mentions: During weekends and holidays the number of all contacts decreased respectively by 21% [14%;27%] and 21% [16%;26%] (Table 1), and by 16% [8%;23%] and 19% [13%;25%] for physical contacts The impact was different between children and adults (Fig 5).

Bottom Line: Holidays and weekends reduced dramatically the number of contacts, and as proxies for school closure, reduced R0 by 33% and 28%, respectively.Despite no clear evidence for temporal variation, trends suggest that more studies are needed.Age and gender were found important determinants of the mixing patterns.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Médecine Interne et Maladies Infectieuses, Centre Hospitalier de Poitiers, Poitiers, France; EA2694, Université Droit et Santé Lille 2, Lille, France; Interuniversity Institute for Biostatistics and statistical Bioinformatics, Hasselt University, Hasselt, Belgium.

ABSTRACT

Background: Empirical social contact patterns are essential to understand the spread of infectious diseases. To date, no such data existed for France. Although infectious diseases are frequently seasonal, the temporal variation of contact patterns has not been documented hitherto.

Methods: COMES-F is the first French large-scale population survey, carried out over 3 different periods (February-March, April, April-May) with some participants common to the first and the last period. Participants described their contacts for 2 consecutive days, and reported separately on professional contacts when typically over 20 per day.

Results: 2033 participants reported 38 881 contacts (weighted median [first quartile-third quartile]: 8[5-14] per day), and 54 378 contacts with supplementary professional contacts (9[5-17]). Contrary to age, gender, household size, holidays, weekend and occupation, period of the year had little influence on the number of contacts or the mixing patterns. Contact patterns were highly assortative with age, irrespective of the location of the contact, and gender, with women having 8% more contacts than men. Although most contacts occurred at home and at school, the inclusion of professional contacts modified the structure of the mixing patterns. Holidays and weekends reduced dramatically the number of contacts, and as proxies for school closure, reduced R0 by 33% and 28%, respectively. Thus, school closures could have an important impact on the spread of close contact infections in France.

Conclusions: Despite no clear evidence for temporal variation, trends suggest that more studies are needed. Age and gender were found important determinants of the mixing patterns. Gender differences in mixing patterns might help explain gender differences in the epidemiology of infectious diseases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus