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A Rapidly Growing Abdominal Mass: Desmoid Tumor in Pregnancy.

Leon MG, Moussa HN, Movahedian M, Viteri OA, Longo M, Sibai BM - AJP Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: Case A giant desmoid tumor arising from the left abdominal wall of a young female patient with rapid growth during pregnancy is described.Decision made by a multidisciplinary team was not to intervene before birth, and abdominal delivery at term was accomplished.Future studies are needed for better understanding of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of desmoid tumors in pregnant women.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, The University of Texas Health and Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas.

ABSTRACT
Background Desmoid tumors are benign soft tissue tumors that locally invade adjacent tissue. There is a paucity of reports describing the rapid growth of these tumors during pregnancy. Case A giant desmoid tumor arising from the left abdominal wall of a young female patient with rapid growth during pregnancy is described. Preoperative evaluation included ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. Decision made by a multidisciplinary team was not to intervene before birth, and abdominal delivery at term was accomplished. Conclusion Desmoid tumors should be part of the differential diagnosis in an abdominal wall tumor of rapid growth during pregnancy. Future studies are needed for better understanding of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of desmoid tumors in pregnant women.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Intraoperative findings: Hypervascular mass compressing adjacent organs. (A) Hypervascular mass. (B) Uterus. (C) Right ovary.
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FI140037-5: Intraoperative findings: Hypervascular mass compressing adjacent organs. (A) Hypervascular mass. (B) Uterus. (C) Right ovary.

Mentions: A primary low transverse cesarean section via right paramedian vertical incision was performed. Intraoperative findings included a large, white-gray, hypervascular mass located in the left lower quadrant measuring approximately 25 cm in its largest diameter, and arising from the anterior abdominal wall (Fig. 5). The uterus was displaced to the right side. The left uterine sidewall, adnexa, and vasculature were all located in the midline of the abdomen. Following the delivery of a live male newborn (birth weight: 3,350 g; frank breech position; Apgar score 9 at 5 minutes) intraoperative evaluation by general surgery was performed and decision was made not to intervene. Patient tolerated the surgical procedure well, and the postoperative course was uneventful. At the monthly follow-up, the patient presented with a new palpable nonmobile mass of 3 × 4 cm at the superior border of the incision that was tender to palpation. This was not present at the time of surgery and subcutaneous hematoma or seroma were ruled out. Unfortunately, the patient's lack of adherence to medical recommendation was a serious obstacle for the definite treatment, and she has yet to undergo surgery for complete resection of the tumor.


A Rapidly Growing Abdominal Mass: Desmoid Tumor in Pregnancy.

Leon MG, Moussa HN, Movahedian M, Viteri OA, Longo M, Sibai BM - AJP Rep (2014)

Intraoperative findings: Hypervascular mass compressing adjacent organs. (A) Hypervascular mass. (B) Uterus. (C) Right ovary.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4502627&req=5

FI140037-5: Intraoperative findings: Hypervascular mass compressing adjacent organs. (A) Hypervascular mass. (B) Uterus. (C) Right ovary.
Mentions: A primary low transverse cesarean section via right paramedian vertical incision was performed. Intraoperative findings included a large, white-gray, hypervascular mass located in the left lower quadrant measuring approximately 25 cm in its largest diameter, and arising from the anterior abdominal wall (Fig. 5). The uterus was displaced to the right side. The left uterine sidewall, adnexa, and vasculature were all located in the midline of the abdomen. Following the delivery of a live male newborn (birth weight: 3,350 g; frank breech position; Apgar score 9 at 5 minutes) intraoperative evaluation by general surgery was performed and decision was made not to intervene. Patient tolerated the surgical procedure well, and the postoperative course was uneventful. At the monthly follow-up, the patient presented with a new palpable nonmobile mass of 3 × 4 cm at the superior border of the incision that was tender to palpation. This was not present at the time of surgery and subcutaneous hematoma or seroma were ruled out. Unfortunately, the patient's lack of adherence to medical recommendation was a serious obstacle for the definite treatment, and she has yet to undergo surgery for complete resection of the tumor.

Bottom Line: Case A giant desmoid tumor arising from the left abdominal wall of a young female patient with rapid growth during pregnancy is described.Decision made by a multidisciplinary team was not to intervene before birth, and abdominal delivery at term was accomplished.Future studies are needed for better understanding of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of desmoid tumors in pregnant women.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, The University of Texas Health and Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas.

ABSTRACT
Background Desmoid tumors are benign soft tissue tumors that locally invade adjacent tissue. There is a paucity of reports describing the rapid growth of these tumors during pregnancy. Case A giant desmoid tumor arising from the left abdominal wall of a young female patient with rapid growth during pregnancy is described. Preoperative evaluation included ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. Decision made by a multidisciplinary team was not to intervene before birth, and abdominal delivery at term was accomplished. Conclusion Desmoid tumors should be part of the differential diagnosis in an abdominal wall tumor of rapid growth during pregnancy. Future studies are needed for better understanding of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of desmoid tumors in pregnant women.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus