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Cross-cultural measurement equivalence of the 5-level EQ-5D (EQ-5D-5L) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Singapore.

Wang Y, Tan NC, Tay EG, Thumboo J, Luo N - Health Qual Life Outcomes (2015)

Bottom Line: Chinese).No significant difference was found in responses to EQ-5D-5L items between any languages, except that patients who chose to complete the Chinese version were more likely to report "no problems" in mobility compared to those who completed the Malay version of the questionnaire.This study provided evidence for the measurement equivalence of the different language versions of EQ-5D-5L in Singapore.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Surgery and Public Health, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 1620 Tremont Street, Boston, MA, USA. yewang@research.bwh.harvard.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study aimed to assess the measurement equivalence of the 5-level EQ-5D (EQ-5D-5L) among the English, Chinese, and Malay versions.

Methods: A convenience sample of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were enrolled from a public primary health care institution in Singapore. The survey questionnaire comprised the EQ-5D-5L and questions assessing participants' socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. Multiple linear regression models were used to assess the difference in EQ-5D-5L index (calculated using an interim algorithm) and EQ-visual analog scale (EQ-VAS) scores across survey language (Chinese vs. English, Malay vs. English, and Malay vs. Chinese). Measurement equivalence was examined by comparing the 90% confidence interval of difference in the EQ-5D-5L index and EQ-VAS scores with a pre-determined equivalence margin. Multiple logistic regression models were used to assess the response patterns of the 5 Likert-type items of the EQ-5D-5L across survey language.

Results: Equivalence was demonstrated between the Chinese and English versions and between the Malay and English versions of the EQ-5D-5L index scores. Equivalence was also demonstrated between the Chinese and English versions and between the Malay and Chinese versions of the EQ-VAS scores. Equivalence could not be determined between the Malay and Chinese versions of the EQ-5D-5L index score and between the Malay and English versions of the EQ-VAS score. No significant difference was found in responses to EQ-5D-5L items between any languages, except that patients who chose to complete the Chinese version were more likely to report "no problems" in mobility compared to those who completed the Malay version of the questionnaire.

Conclusions: This study provided evidence for the measurement equivalence of the different language versions of EQ-5D-5L in Singapore.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Possible relationships between equivalence margins and 90 % confidence intervals
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Fig1: Possible relationships between equivalence margins and 90 % confidence intervals

Mentions: Measurement equivalence is demonstrated if the difference across language is clinically unimportant [12]. Based on the approach to evaluating therapeutic equivalence in clinical trials [13, 14], we assessed measurement equivalence across language by comparing the 90 % confidence interval (CI) of the between-language difference in the EQ-5D-5L index and EQ-VAS scores, respectively, with a pre-determined equivalence margin that represented a range of score difference too small to be clinically important [15]. Based on studies of the minimally important differences of the EQ-5D [16–18], the equivalence margin was set as −0.08 to 0.08 for the EQ-5D-5L index scores [19, 20] and −10.00 to 10.00 for the EQ-VAS scores. This would lead to one of the three possible results (Fig. 1): 1) ‘equivalence’ was demonstrated if the 90 % CI fell completely within the equivalence margin, 2) ‘equivalence undetermined’ (i.e., equivalence cannot be determined, and either equivalence or non-equivalence might be presented) was demonstrated if the 90 % CI partially overlapped with the equivalence margin, and 3)’non-equivalence’ was demonstrated if the 90 % CI fell completely outside the equivalence margin.Fig. 1


Cross-cultural measurement equivalence of the 5-level EQ-5D (EQ-5D-5L) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Singapore.

Wang Y, Tan NC, Tay EG, Thumboo J, Luo N - Health Qual Life Outcomes (2015)

Possible relationships between equivalence margins and 90 % confidence intervals
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4502594&req=5

Fig1: Possible relationships between equivalence margins and 90 % confidence intervals
Mentions: Measurement equivalence is demonstrated if the difference across language is clinically unimportant [12]. Based on the approach to evaluating therapeutic equivalence in clinical trials [13, 14], we assessed measurement equivalence across language by comparing the 90 % confidence interval (CI) of the between-language difference in the EQ-5D-5L index and EQ-VAS scores, respectively, with a pre-determined equivalence margin that represented a range of score difference too small to be clinically important [15]. Based on studies of the minimally important differences of the EQ-5D [16–18], the equivalence margin was set as −0.08 to 0.08 for the EQ-5D-5L index scores [19, 20] and −10.00 to 10.00 for the EQ-VAS scores. This would lead to one of the three possible results (Fig. 1): 1) ‘equivalence’ was demonstrated if the 90 % CI fell completely within the equivalence margin, 2) ‘equivalence undetermined’ (i.e., equivalence cannot be determined, and either equivalence or non-equivalence might be presented) was demonstrated if the 90 % CI partially overlapped with the equivalence margin, and 3)’non-equivalence’ was demonstrated if the 90 % CI fell completely outside the equivalence margin.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Chinese).No significant difference was found in responses to EQ-5D-5L items between any languages, except that patients who chose to complete the Chinese version were more likely to report "no problems" in mobility compared to those who completed the Malay version of the questionnaire.This study provided evidence for the measurement equivalence of the different language versions of EQ-5D-5L in Singapore.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Surgery and Public Health, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 1620 Tremont Street, Boston, MA, USA. yewang@research.bwh.harvard.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study aimed to assess the measurement equivalence of the 5-level EQ-5D (EQ-5D-5L) among the English, Chinese, and Malay versions.

Methods: A convenience sample of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were enrolled from a public primary health care institution in Singapore. The survey questionnaire comprised the EQ-5D-5L and questions assessing participants' socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. Multiple linear regression models were used to assess the difference in EQ-5D-5L index (calculated using an interim algorithm) and EQ-visual analog scale (EQ-VAS) scores across survey language (Chinese vs. English, Malay vs. English, and Malay vs. Chinese). Measurement equivalence was examined by comparing the 90% confidence interval of difference in the EQ-5D-5L index and EQ-VAS scores with a pre-determined equivalence margin. Multiple logistic regression models were used to assess the response patterns of the 5 Likert-type items of the EQ-5D-5L across survey language.

Results: Equivalence was demonstrated between the Chinese and English versions and between the Malay and English versions of the EQ-5D-5L index scores. Equivalence was also demonstrated between the Chinese and English versions and between the Malay and Chinese versions of the EQ-VAS scores. Equivalence could not be determined between the Malay and Chinese versions of the EQ-5D-5L index score and between the Malay and English versions of the EQ-VAS score. No significant difference was found in responses to EQ-5D-5L items between any languages, except that patients who chose to complete the Chinese version were more likely to report "no problems" in mobility compared to those who completed the Malay version of the questionnaire.

Conclusions: This study provided evidence for the measurement equivalence of the different language versions of EQ-5D-5L in Singapore.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus