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Transcriptome and expression profiling analysis link patterns of gene expression to antennal responses in Spodoptera litura.

Feng B, Lin X, Zheng K, Qian K, Chang Y, Du Y - BMC Genomics (2015)

Bottom Line: The majority of olfactory genes showed sex-biased expression, usually male-biased in ORs.A link between OR gene expression and antennal responses to odors was evident, a third of the compounds tested evoking a sex-biased response, in every case also male-biased.Two candidate pheromone receptors, OR14 and OR23 were especially strongly expressed and male-biased and we suggest that these may respond to the two female sex pheromone components of S. litura, Z9E11-14:OAc and Z9E12-14:OAc, which evoked strongly male-biased EAG responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Health and Environmental Ecology, Wenzhou Medical University, University Town, Wenzhou, 325035, China. fb820529@aliyun.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The study of olfaction is key to understanding the interaction of insects with their environment and provides opportunities to develop novel tactics for control of pest species. Recent developments in transcriptomic approaches enable the molecular basis of olfaction to be studied even in species with limited genomic information. Here we use transcriptome and expression profiling analysis to characterize the antennal transcriptome of the noctuid moth and polyphagous pest Spodoptera litura.

Results: We identify 74 candidate genes involved in odor detection and recognition, encoding 26 ORs, 21 OBPs, 18 CSPs and 9 IRs. We examine their expression levels in both sexes and seek evidence for their function by relating their expression with levels of EAG response in male and female antennae to 58 host and non-host plant volatiles and sex pheromone components. The majority of olfactory genes showed sex-biased expression, usually male-biased in ORs. A link between OR gene expression and antennal responses to odors was evident, a third of the compounds tested evoking a sex-biased response, in every case also male-biased. Two candidate pheromone receptors, OR14 and OR23 were especially strongly expressed and male-biased and we suggest that these may respond to the two female sex pheromone components of S. litura, Z9E11-14:OAc and Z9E12-14:OAc, which evoked strongly male-biased EAG responses.

Conclusions: Our results provide the molecular basis for elucidating the olfactory profile of moths and the sexual divergence of their behavior and could enable the targeting of particular genes, and behaviors for pest management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Expression levels of olfactory genes inmale and femaleS. lituraantennae measured in single-end RNA-Seq(A) and RT-qPCR (B). In single-end RNA-Seq,expression was calculated with log scale of RPKM value. Thesignificant difference between female and male was justified bymethod of Audic and Claverie (1997) and indicated by symbol “*”(FDR < 0.01 and P < 0.05). In RT-qPCR, gene expression wascalculated by the 2-∆∆Cq algorithmwith male as control, GAPDHand UCCR as reference genes.Female gene expression is presented normalized to male antennalexpression arbitrarily defined as 1. Error bars signify SD.Significance of difference between male and female responsesindicated by *P < 0.05, “#” means the significant differencebetween GAPDH and UCCR (P < 0.05), Studentst test.
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Fig2: Expression levels of olfactory genes inmale and femaleS. lituraantennae measured in single-end RNA-Seq(A) and RT-qPCR (B). In single-end RNA-Seq,expression was calculated with log scale of RPKM value. Thesignificant difference between female and male was justified bymethod of Audic and Claverie (1997) and indicated by symbol “*”(FDR < 0.01 and P < 0.05). In RT-qPCR, gene expression wascalculated by the 2-∆∆Cq algorithmwith male as control, GAPDHand UCCR as reference genes.Female gene expression is presented normalized to male antennalexpression arbitrarily defined as 1. Error bars signify SD.Significance of difference between male and female responsesindicated by *P < 0.05, “#” means the significant differencebetween GAPDH and UCCR (P < 0.05), Studentst test.

Mentions: Expression levels of putative OR genes were low. The RPKM valuesfor all ORs were less than 70, except for ORCO which had values of 179 and 262 for female and maleantennae, respectively (Figure 2A). Fourof the sex differences of ORs in expression shown by RNA-Seq were confirmed byRT-qPCR (Figure 2). Most of sexdifferences of ORs in expression shown by RNA-Seq were confirmed by RT-qPCR(Figure 2). Of 21 recognized generalORs, RT-qPCR showed 2 to be significantly more expressed in female antennae,relative to the standard GAPDH and UCCR gene, and 170 were significantly moreexpressed in male antennae (Figure 2B).Like other ORs, expression levels of candidate pheromone receptors measured inthe RNA-Seq analysis were low (≤80 RPKM) (Figure 3A). However, expression of OR23 and OR14 in males wasmarkedly higher than for the other 3 candidate pheromone receptors(Figure 3A) and expression ofOR14 was amongst the most male-biased.RT-qPCR confirmed the markedly higher relative expression of all candidatepheromone receptors in male antennae (Figure 3B). Usually the difference of general ORs between the sexeswas less than four fold. However, OR6 waspredominantly expressed in the male compared to the female antennae(Figure 4).Figure 2


Transcriptome and expression profiling analysis link patterns of gene expression to antennal responses in Spodoptera litura.

Feng B, Lin X, Zheng K, Qian K, Chang Y, Du Y - BMC Genomics (2015)

Expression levels of olfactory genes inmale and femaleS. lituraantennae measured in single-end RNA-Seq(A) and RT-qPCR (B). In single-end RNA-Seq,expression was calculated with log scale of RPKM value. Thesignificant difference between female and male was justified bymethod of Audic and Claverie (1997) and indicated by symbol “*”(FDR < 0.01 and P < 0.05). In RT-qPCR, gene expression wascalculated by the 2-∆∆Cq algorithmwith male as control, GAPDHand UCCR as reference genes.Female gene expression is presented normalized to male antennalexpression arbitrarily defined as 1. Error bars signify SD.Significance of difference between male and female responsesindicated by *P < 0.05, “#” means the significant differencebetween GAPDH and UCCR (P < 0.05), Studentst test.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4502548&req=5

Fig2: Expression levels of olfactory genes inmale and femaleS. lituraantennae measured in single-end RNA-Seq(A) and RT-qPCR (B). In single-end RNA-Seq,expression was calculated with log scale of RPKM value. Thesignificant difference between female and male was justified bymethod of Audic and Claverie (1997) and indicated by symbol “*”(FDR < 0.01 and P < 0.05). In RT-qPCR, gene expression wascalculated by the 2-∆∆Cq algorithmwith male as control, GAPDHand UCCR as reference genes.Female gene expression is presented normalized to male antennalexpression arbitrarily defined as 1. Error bars signify SD.Significance of difference between male and female responsesindicated by *P < 0.05, “#” means the significant differencebetween GAPDH and UCCR (P < 0.05), Studentst test.
Mentions: Expression levels of putative OR genes were low. The RPKM valuesfor all ORs were less than 70, except for ORCO which had values of 179 and 262 for female and maleantennae, respectively (Figure 2A). Fourof the sex differences of ORs in expression shown by RNA-Seq were confirmed byRT-qPCR (Figure 2). Most of sexdifferences of ORs in expression shown by RNA-Seq were confirmed by RT-qPCR(Figure 2). Of 21 recognized generalORs, RT-qPCR showed 2 to be significantly more expressed in female antennae,relative to the standard GAPDH and UCCR gene, and 170 were significantly moreexpressed in male antennae (Figure 2B).Like other ORs, expression levels of candidate pheromone receptors measured inthe RNA-Seq analysis were low (≤80 RPKM) (Figure 3A). However, expression of OR23 and OR14 in males wasmarkedly higher than for the other 3 candidate pheromone receptors(Figure 3A) and expression ofOR14 was amongst the most male-biased.RT-qPCR confirmed the markedly higher relative expression of all candidatepheromone receptors in male antennae (Figure 3B). Usually the difference of general ORs between the sexeswas less than four fold. However, OR6 waspredominantly expressed in the male compared to the female antennae(Figure 4).Figure 2

Bottom Line: The majority of olfactory genes showed sex-biased expression, usually male-biased in ORs.A link between OR gene expression and antennal responses to odors was evident, a third of the compounds tested evoking a sex-biased response, in every case also male-biased.Two candidate pheromone receptors, OR14 and OR23 were especially strongly expressed and male-biased and we suggest that these may respond to the two female sex pheromone components of S. litura, Z9E11-14:OAc and Z9E12-14:OAc, which evoked strongly male-biased EAG responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Health and Environmental Ecology, Wenzhou Medical University, University Town, Wenzhou, 325035, China. fb820529@aliyun.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The study of olfaction is key to understanding the interaction of insects with their environment and provides opportunities to develop novel tactics for control of pest species. Recent developments in transcriptomic approaches enable the molecular basis of olfaction to be studied even in species with limited genomic information. Here we use transcriptome and expression profiling analysis to characterize the antennal transcriptome of the noctuid moth and polyphagous pest Spodoptera litura.

Results: We identify 74 candidate genes involved in odor detection and recognition, encoding 26 ORs, 21 OBPs, 18 CSPs and 9 IRs. We examine their expression levels in both sexes and seek evidence for their function by relating their expression with levels of EAG response in male and female antennae to 58 host and non-host plant volatiles and sex pheromone components. The majority of olfactory genes showed sex-biased expression, usually male-biased in ORs. A link between OR gene expression and antennal responses to odors was evident, a third of the compounds tested evoking a sex-biased response, in every case also male-biased. Two candidate pheromone receptors, OR14 and OR23 were especially strongly expressed and male-biased and we suggest that these may respond to the two female sex pheromone components of S. litura, Z9E11-14:OAc and Z9E12-14:OAc, which evoked strongly male-biased EAG responses.

Conclusions: Our results provide the molecular basis for elucidating the olfactory profile of moths and the sexual divergence of their behavior and could enable the targeting of particular genes, and behaviors for pest management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus