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Malaria-like symptoms associated with a natural Plasmodium reichenowi infection in a chimpanzee.

Herbert A, Boundenga L, Meyer A, Moukodoum DN, Okouga AP, Arnathau C, Durand P, Magnus J, Ngoubangoye B, Willaume E, Ba CT, Rougeron V, Renaud F, Ollomo B, Prugnolle F - Malar. J. (2015)

Bottom Line: Although Plasmodium infections have never been clearly associated with symptoms in non-human primates, the question of the pathogenicity of Plasmodium parasites in non-human primates still remains unanswered.A young chimpanzee, followed before and after release to a sanctuary, in a semi-free ranging enclosure located in an equatorial forest, showed fever and strong anaemia associated with a high Plasmodium reichenowi infection, shortly after release.This may be the first description of malaria-like symptoms in a chimpanzee infected with Plasmodium.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre de Primatologie, Centre International de Recherches Médicales de Franceville, BP 769, Franceville, Gabon. anaisherbert@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Although Plasmodium infections have never been clearly associated with symptoms in non-human primates, the question of the pathogenicity of Plasmodium parasites in non-human primates still remains unanswered. A young chimpanzee, followed before and after release to a sanctuary, in a semi-free ranging enclosure located in an equatorial forest, showed fever and strong anaemia associated with a high Plasmodium reichenowi infection, shortly after release. The animal recovered from anaemia after several months despite recurrent infection with other Plasmodium species. This may be the first description of malaria-like symptoms in a chimpanzee infected with Plasmodium.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Blood results, temperature and parasitaemia comparison between Wonga and other chimpanzees on day 192. a Haemoglobin levels (g/dl); (b) Haematocrit (%); (c) Red blood cell count (×106/mm3); (d) Parasitaemia (parasites/μl of blood); (e) Temperature (°C). Ht: Haematocrit; HB: Haemoglobin; RBC: Red blood cells
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Fig3: Blood results, temperature and parasitaemia comparison between Wonga and other chimpanzees on day 192. a Haemoglobin levels (g/dl); (b) Haematocrit (%); (c) Red blood cell count (×106/mm3); (d) Parasitaemia (parasites/μl of blood); (e) Temperature (°C). Ht: Haematocrit; HB: Haemoglobin; RBC: Red blood cells

Mentions: Three and a half months after her transfer to the Parc de la Lékédi, on day 192, annual check-up of all chimpanzees of the group was routinely performed. Four chimpanzees (including this animal) were sampled on the same day. They were anaesthetized with ketamine (10 mg/kg) via intramuscular injection. The veterinarians noticed that Wonga was less active, calmer and sleepier than usual and than the other chimpanzees. Her physical examination revealed no abnormalities, except that her rectal temperature was high (39 °C), unlike her previous temperatures observed during quarantine (Fig. 2d) and unlike the three other chimpanzees examined the same day (mean = 37.56 °C, SD = 0.28868) (Fig. 3e). Veterinarians also noticed that Wonga did not gain any weight since her quarantine (Fig. 2f).Fig. 3


Malaria-like symptoms associated with a natural Plasmodium reichenowi infection in a chimpanzee.

Herbert A, Boundenga L, Meyer A, Moukodoum DN, Okouga AP, Arnathau C, Durand P, Magnus J, Ngoubangoye B, Willaume E, Ba CT, Rougeron V, Renaud F, Ollomo B, Prugnolle F - Malar. J. (2015)

Blood results, temperature and parasitaemia comparison between Wonga and other chimpanzees on day 192. a Haemoglobin levels (g/dl); (b) Haematocrit (%); (c) Red blood cell count (×106/mm3); (d) Parasitaemia (parasites/μl of blood); (e) Temperature (°C). Ht: Haematocrit; HB: Haemoglobin; RBC: Red blood cells
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4502519&req=5

Fig3: Blood results, temperature and parasitaemia comparison between Wonga and other chimpanzees on day 192. a Haemoglobin levels (g/dl); (b) Haematocrit (%); (c) Red blood cell count (×106/mm3); (d) Parasitaemia (parasites/μl of blood); (e) Temperature (°C). Ht: Haematocrit; HB: Haemoglobin; RBC: Red blood cells
Mentions: Three and a half months after her transfer to the Parc de la Lékédi, on day 192, annual check-up of all chimpanzees of the group was routinely performed. Four chimpanzees (including this animal) were sampled on the same day. They were anaesthetized with ketamine (10 mg/kg) via intramuscular injection. The veterinarians noticed that Wonga was less active, calmer and sleepier than usual and than the other chimpanzees. Her physical examination revealed no abnormalities, except that her rectal temperature was high (39 °C), unlike her previous temperatures observed during quarantine (Fig. 2d) and unlike the three other chimpanzees examined the same day (mean = 37.56 °C, SD = 0.28868) (Fig. 3e). Veterinarians also noticed that Wonga did not gain any weight since her quarantine (Fig. 2f).Fig. 3

Bottom Line: Although Plasmodium infections have never been clearly associated with symptoms in non-human primates, the question of the pathogenicity of Plasmodium parasites in non-human primates still remains unanswered.A young chimpanzee, followed before and after release to a sanctuary, in a semi-free ranging enclosure located in an equatorial forest, showed fever and strong anaemia associated with a high Plasmodium reichenowi infection, shortly after release.This may be the first description of malaria-like symptoms in a chimpanzee infected with Plasmodium.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre de Primatologie, Centre International de Recherches Médicales de Franceville, BP 769, Franceville, Gabon. anaisherbert@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Although Plasmodium infections have never been clearly associated with symptoms in non-human primates, the question of the pathogenicity of Plasmodium parasites in non-human primates still remains unanswered. A young chimpanzee, followed before and after release to a sanctuary, in a semi-free ranging enclosure located in an equatorial forest, showed fever and strong anaemia associated with a high Plasmodium reichenowi infection, shortly after release. The animal recovered from anaemia after several months despite recurrent infection with other Plasmodium species. This may be the first description of malaria-like symptoms in a chimpanzee infected with Plasmodium.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus