Limits...
Seismic footprints of shallow dyke propagation at Etna, Italy.

Falsaperla S, Neri M - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Continuous monitoring of active volcanoes helps significantly in achieving this goal.Data acquisition continued until the arrival of the lava flow that led to the breakdown of the transmission system.Bridging instrumental recordings, fieldwork and conceptual modelling, these data are interpreted as the seismic footprints of a magmatic dyke intrusion that moved at speed ~0.02 m/s (first stage) and 0.46 m/s (second stage).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione di Catania, Osservatorio Etneo, Piazza Roma 2, 95125, Catania, Italy.

ABSTRACT
One of the key issues in forecasting volcanic eruptions is to detect signals that can track the propagation of dykes towards the surface. Continuous monitoring of active volcanoes helps significantly in achieving this goal. The seismic data presented here are unique, as they document surface faulting processes close (tens to a few hundred meters) to their source, namely the dyke tip. They originated nearby - and under - a seismic station that was subsequently destroyed by lava flows during eruptive activity at Etna volcano, Italy, in 2013. On February 20, a ~600 m-long and ~120 m wide NW-SE fracture field opened at an altitude between 2750 and 2900 m. The consequent rock dislocation caused the station to tilt and offset the seismic signal temporarily. Data acquisition continued until the arrival of the lava flow that led to the breakdown of the transmission system. Shallow ground fracturing and repeated low-frequency oscillations occurred during two stages in which the seismic signal underwent a maximum offset ~2.57 × 10(4) nm/s. Bridging instrumental recordings, fieldwork and conceptual modelling, these data are interpreted as the seismic footprints of a magmatic dyke intrusion that moved at speed ~0.02 m/s (first stage) and 0.46 m/s (second stage).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

a) Eruptive activity, b) spectrograms of the seismic signal at ESPC, ESLN, EBEL, c) amplitude of volcanic tremor at EBEL, and d) latitude of the centroid of volcanic tremor from 18 to 28 February 2013. Coloured bands in d) mark the approximate latitude of the North-East Crater (NEC), Bocca Nuova (BN), Voragine (VOR) and South-East Crater (SEC) system.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4502396&req=5

f2: a) Eruptive activity, b) spectrograms of the seismic signal at ESPC, ESLN, EBEL, c) amplitude of volcanic tremor at EBEL, and d) latitude of the centroid of volcanic tremor from 18 to 28 February 2013. Coloured bands in d) mark the approximate latitude of the North-East Crater (NEC), Bocca Nuova (BN), Voragine (VOR) and South-East Crater (SEC) system.

Mentions: Table 1 summarizes eruptive activity at the summit craters and seismic data recorded at EBEL in February 2013 (all times are UT). During the month, NSEC produced six short-lived (a few hours-long) paroxysmal eruptions. The first four episodes occurred between February 19 and 21 with repose periods lasting a few hours; the last two paroxysms were on February 23 and 28, respectively (Fig. 2). Two main stages of fracturing phenomena also took place at the southeastern base of NSEC on February 20 and 28.


Seismic footprints of shallow dyke propagation at Etna, Italy.

Falsaperla S, Neri M - Sci Rep (2015)

a) Eruptive activity, b) spectrograms of the seismic signal at ESPC, ESLN, EBEL, c) amplitude of volcanic tremor at EBEL, and d) latitude of the centroid of volcanic tremor from 18 to 28 February 2013. Coloured bands in d) mark the approximate latitude of the North-East Crater (NEC), Bocca Nuova (BN), Voragine (VOR) and South-East Crater (SEC) system.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4502396&req=5

f2: a) Eruptive activity, b) spectrograms of the seismic signal at ESPC, ESLN, EBEL, c) amplitude of volcanic tremor at EBEL, and d) latitude of the centroid of volcanic tremor from 18 to 28 February 2013. Coloured bands in d) mark the approximate latitude of the North-East Crater (NEC), Bocca Nuova (BN), Voragine (VOR) and South-East Crater (SEC) system.
Mentions: Table 1 summarizes eruptive activity at the summit craters and seismic data recorded at EBEL in February 2013 (all times are UT). During the month, NSEC produced six short-lived (a few hours-long) paroxysmal eruptions. The first four episodes occurred between February 19 and 21 with repose periods lasting a few hours; the last two paroxysms were on February 23 and 28, respectively (Fig. 2). Two main stages of fracturing phenomena also took place at the southeastern base of NSEC on February 20 and 28.

Bottom Line: Continuous monitoring of active volcanoes helps significantly in achieving this goal.Data acquisition continued until the arrival of the lava flow that led to the breakdown of the transmission system.Bridging instrumental recordings, fieldwork and conceptual modelling, these data are interpreted as the seismic footprints of a magmatic dyke intrusion that moved at speed ~0.02 m/s (first stage) and 0.46 m/s (second stage).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione di Catania, Osservatorio Etneo, Piazza Roma 2, 95125, Catania, Italy.

ABSTRACT
One of the key issues in forecasting volcanic eruptions is to detect signals that can track the propagation of dykes towards the surface. Continuous monitoring of active volcanoes helps significantly in achieving this goal. The seismic data presented here are unique, as they document surface faulting processes close (tens to a few hundred meters) to their source, namely the dyke tip. They originated nearby - and under - a seismic station that was subsequently destroyed by lava flows during eruptive activity at Etna volcano, Italy, in 2013. On February 20, a ~600 m-long and ~120 m wide NW-SE fracture field opened at an altitude between 2750 and 2900 m. The consequent rock dislocation caused the station to tilt and offset the seismic signal temporarily. Data acquisition continued until the arrival of the lava flow that led to the breakdown of the transmission system. Shallow ground fracturing and repeated low-frequency oscillations occurred during two stages in which the seismic signal underwent a maximum offset ~2.57 × 10(4) nm/s. Bridging instrumental recordings, fieldwork and conceptual modelling, these data are interpreted as the seismic footprints of a magmatic dyke intrusion that moved at speed ~0.02 m/s (first stage) and 0.46 m/s (second stage).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus