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Associations between perceptions of e-cigarette advertising and interest in product trial amongst US adult smokers and non-smokers: results from an internet-based pilot survey.

Smith DM, Bansal-Travers M, O'Connor RJ, Goniewicz ML, Hyland A - Tob Induc Dis (2015)

Bottom Line: Participants exposed to e-cigarette ads more frequently reported favorable product attitudes compared to participants exposed to snus ads.Participants randomized to the e-cigarette ad group were significantly more likely to choose an e-cigarette at product selection (p-value = 0.014).Within the e-cigarette condition, 71 % of smokers selected an e-cigarette at product selection, compared to 25 % of non-smokers; smoking status was significantly associated with sample product selection (p-value <0.001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Behavior, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Elm & Carlton Streets, Buffalo, NY 14263 USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) have risen in popularity in the U.S. While recent studies have described the prevalence and demographics of e-cigarette users, few studies have evaluated the impact of advertising on perceptions and interest in trial. This pilot study was conducted to assess whether exposure to ads for e-cigarettes or a comparison product (snus), elicited differences in interest to try e-cigarettes between smokers and non-smokers.

Methods: A web-based survey was completed by 600 respondents, aged 18-65, recruited from an internet panel in the U.S. Respondents answered questions assessing tobacco use, and then viewed nine magazine ads for Blu e-cigarettes or Camel snus, a low-nitrosamine smokeless tobacco product, in random order. After viewing each ad, respondents were asked a series of questions about their perceptions, beliefs, attitudes, and interest in trial. At the end, respondents were asked to choose a free sample product from the following options: an e-cigarette, smokeless tobacco (SLT), pack of cigarettes, or no product.

Results: Ad receptivity scores did not appear to be influenced by ad theme; differences existed between smokers and non-smokers. Participants exposed to e-cigarette ads more frequently reported favorable product attitudes compared to participants exposed to snus ads. Cigarette smokers in the e-cigarette condition were more likely to report interest in trying e-cigarettes compared to non-smokers in that condition (p-value < 0.001). Six percent of non-smokers exposed to e-cigarette ads reported interest in trying e-cigarettes. E-cigarettes were the most popular product selected to sample (34 %), followed by cigarettes (8 %) and SLT (3 %); 331 respondents (55 %) chose no product. Participants randomized to the e-cigarette ad group were significantly more likely to choose an e-cigarette at product selection (p-value = 0.014). Within the e-cigarette condition, 71 % of smokers selected an e-cigarette at product selection, compared to 25 % of non-smokers; smoking status was significantly associated with sample product selection (p-value <0.001).

Conclusions: These findings suggest that exposure to e-cigarette ads may be associated with interest in e-cigarette trial, particularly among smokers. Continued exposure to advertising in magazines, on television, and at the point-of-sale may have an impact on willingness to receive promotional products or intention to try e-cigarettes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Study design
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Fig1: Study design

Mentions: This web-based survey was conducted in March 2013 among cigarette smokers and non-smokers, including current users of e-cigarettes (see schema, Fig. 1). Sample members were recruited through a web panel managed by Global Market Insite, an organization specializing in the administration of online surveys (http://www.lightspeedgmi.com/). Eligible participants answered a series of preliminary questions to confirm that they were between ages 18 and 65, current United States residents, and able to read and write in English. After determining eligibility, participants were directed to an informed consent screen, clicking a button indicating consent. Respondents completed a core series of questions adapted from a similar study assessing tobacco use, past quit attempts, use of nicotine replacement therapies, and knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about nicotine-containing products [27]. Next, respondents were randomized to one of two exposure groups to view magazine ads for (Blu) e-cigarettes or (Camel) snus. Advertisements belonged to one of three a priori themes discerned by raters prior to survey initiation (as described below). Once a participant was randomized to a condition, they were shown nine ads for that product. Within-product presentation sequence of ads was randomized to minimize ordering effects. Participants were asked a series of questions after viewing each ad, as well as a shortened list of product attitudes used in prior research (Table 1) [28–30]. After viewing all ads in their assigned group, participants were asked, “If we had the opportunity to send you a free sample of one of the products listed below, which of the products would you choose?” (response options: an e-cigarette, a tin of smokeless tobacco, a pack of cigarettes, or ‘please do not send me any of these’). At this point, participants were not explicitly made aware by the research team that they would not receive a free sample product. Following the selection of a product, participants were debriefed and informed that ethical guidelines do not allow the researchers to mail free samples of products. The research protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board at Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, NY.Fig. 1


Associations between perceptions of e-cigarette advertising and interest in product trial amongst US adult smokers and non-smokers: results from an internet-based pilot survey.

Smith DM, Bansal-Travers M, O'Connor RJ, Goniewicz ML, Hyland A - Tob Induc Dis (2015)

Study design
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4502389&req=5

Fig1: Study design
Mentions: This web-based survey was conducted in March 2013 among cigarette smokers and non-smokers, including current users of e-cigarettes (see schema, Fig. 1). Sample members were recruited through a web panel managed by Global Market Insite, an organization specializing in the administration of online surveys (http://www.lightspeedgmi.com/). Eligible participants answered a series of preliminary questions to confirm that they were between ages 18 and 65, current United States residents, and able to read and write in English. After determining eligibility, participants were directed to an informed consent screen, clicking a button indicating consent. Respondents completed a core series of questions adapted from a similar study assessing tobacco use, past quit attempts, use of nicotine replacement therapies, and knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about nicotine-containing products [27]. Next, respondents were randomized to one of two exposure groups to view magazine ads for (Blu) e-cigarettes or (Camel) snus. Advertisements belonged to one of three a priori themes discerned by raters prior to survey initiation (as described below). Once a participant was randomized to a condition, they were shown nine ads for that product. Within-product presentation sequence of ads was randomized to minimize ordering effects. Participants were asked a series of questions after viewing each ad, as well as a shortened list of product attitudes used in prior research (Table 1) [28–30]. After viewing all ads in their assigned group, participants were asked, “If we had the opportunity to send you a free sample of one of the products listed below, which of the products would you choose?” (response options: an e-cigarette, a tin of smokeless tobacco, a pack of cigarettes, or ‘please do not send me any of these’). At this point, participants were not explicitly made aware by the research team that they would not receive a free sample product. Following the selection of a product, participants were debriefed and informed that ethical guidelines do not allow the researchers to mail free samples of products. The research protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board at Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, NY.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Participants exposed to e-cigarette ads more frequently reported favorable product attitudes compared to participants exposed to snus ads.Participants randomized to the e-cigarette ad group were significantly more likely to choose an e-cigarette at product selection (p-value = 0.014).Within the e-cigarette condition, 71 % of smokers selected an e-cigarette at product selection, compared to 25 % of non-smokers; smoking status was significantly associated with sample product selection (p-value <0.001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Behavior, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Elm & Carlton Streets, Buffalo, NY 14263 USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) have risen in popularity in the U.S. While recent studies have described the prevalence and demographics of e-cigarette users, few studies have evaluated the impact of advertising on perceptions and interest in trial. This pilot study was conducted to assess whether exposure to ads for e-cigarettes or a comparison product (snus), elicited differences in interest to try e-cigarettes between smokers and non-smokers.

Methods: A web-based survey was completed by 600 respondents, aged 18-65, recruited from an internet panel in the U.S. Respondents answered questions assessing tobacco use, and then viewed nine magazine ads for Blu e-cigarettes or Camel snus, a low-nitrosamine smokeless tobacco product, in random order. After viewing each ad, respondents were asked a series of questions about their perceptions, beliefs, attitudes, and interest in trial. At the end, respondents were asked to choose a free sample product from the following options: an e-cigarette, smokeless tobacco (SLT), pack of cigarettes, or no product.

Results: Ad receptivity scores did not appear to be influenced by ad theme; differences existed between smokers and non-smokers. Participants exposed to e-cigarette ads more frequently reported favorable product attitudes compared to participants exposed to snus ads. Cigarette smokers in the e-cigarette condition were more likely to report interest in trying e-cigarettes compared to non-smokers in that condition (p-value < 0.001). Six percent of non-smokers exposed to e-cigarette ads reported interest in trying e-cigarettes. E-cigarettes were the most popular product selected to sample (34 %), followed by cigarettes (8 %) and SLT (3 %); 331 respondents (55 %) chose no product. Participants randomized to the e-cigarette ad group were significantly more likely to choose an e-cigarette at product selection (p-value = 0.014). Within the e-cigarette condition, 71 % of smokers selected an e-cigarette at product selection, compared to 25 % of non-smokers; smoking status was significantly associated with sample product selection (p-value <0.001).

Conclusions: These findings suggest that exposure to e-cigarette ads may be associated with interest in e-cigarette trial, particularly among smokers. Continued exposure to advertising in magazines, on television, and at the point-of-sale may have an impact on willingness to receive promotional products or intention to try e-cigarettes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus