Limits...
RAD-QTL Mapping Reveals Both Genome-Level Parallelism and Different Genetic Architecture Underlying the Evolution of Body Shape in Lake Whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) Species Pairs.

Laporte M, Rogers SM, Dion-Côté AM, Normandeau E, Gagnaire PA, Dalziel AC, Chebib J, Bernatchez L - G3 (Bethesda) (2015)

Bottom Line: The single-locus approach provided limited evidence for genetic parallelism.However, the polygenic analysis revealed genetic parallelism for three of the five lakes, which differed from the two other lakes.These results provide evidence for both genetic parallelism and multiple genetic routes underlying parallel phenotypic evolution in fish shape among populations occupying similar ecological niches.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut de Biologie Intégrative et des Systèmes (IBIS), Département de Biologie, Université Laval, Pavillon Charles-Eugène-Marchand, Québec, G1V 0A6, Canada uni.mlaporte@gmail.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Fish shape variation among individuals along PC1 and PC2 in all five lakes. Each dot represents an individual (black color = normal species; white color = dwarf species). The means fish shape for each species lakes combination were also indicated (circle = Cliff; square = East; diamond = Indian; upper triangle = Témiscouata and lower triangle = Webster).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4502382&req=5

fig2: Fish shape variation among individuals along PC1 and PC2 in all five lakes. Each dot represents an individual (black color = normal species; white color = dwarf species). The means fish shape for each species lakes combination were also indicated (circle = Cliff; square = East; diamond = Indian; upper triangle = Témiscouata and lower triangle = Webster).

Mentions: Broken-stick distribution indicated that only the two first PCs were informative. The first axis represents 50.6% of the variation and show variation among lakes (Figure 2). With the exception of Témiscouata Lake, dwarf Whitefish species also showed lower mean score on this axis than normal Whitefish (Figure 2). The second axis represents 35.7% of the variation and showed a clear distinction between all dwarf and normal Whitefish (Figure 2). Euclidian distance showed an increasing gradient in the following order: Webster (0.020; P-value = 0.032), Témiscouata (0.021; P-value < 0.001), Cliff (0.028; P-value < 0.001), East (0.032; P-value < 0.001), and Indian (0.038; P-value < 0.001). This gradient roughly correspond to the one observed with the juxtaposition of mean shape (Figure 3). In addition, all between-group PCA angles point in a similar direction (9−55°). Interestingly, the lower angle observed (Cliff: 9°) is linked to a ventral thinning in dwarf in comparison to normal Whitefish (Figure 3), the greater angle (Témiscouata: 55°) is linked to a dorsal thinning in dwarf (Figure 3) and the intermediary angles (Indian: 18°, Webster: 22°, and East: 25°) are linked to both ventral and dorsal thinning (Figure 3). Dwarf Whitefish also have bigger eyes and longer tails than the normal fish in all of the five lakes (Figure 3).


RAD-QTL Mapping Reveals Both Genome-Level Parallelism and Different Genetic Architecture Underlying the Evolution of Body Shape in Lake Whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) Species Pairs.

Laporte M, Rogers SM, Dion-Côté AM, Normandeau E, Gagnaire PA, Dalziel AC, Chebib J, Bernatchez L - G3 (Bethesda) (2015)

Fish shape variation among individuals along PC1 and PC2 in all five lakes. Each dot represents an individual (black color = normal species; white color = dwarf species). The means fish shape for each species lakes combination were also indicated (circle = Cliff; square = East; diamond = Indian; upper triangle = Témiscouata and lower triangle = Webster).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4502382&req=5

fig2: Fish shape variation among individuals along PC1 and PC2 in all five lakes. Each dot represents an individual (black color = normal species; white color = dwarf species). The means fish shape for each species lakes combination were also indicated (circle = Cliff; square = East; diamond = Indian; upper triangle = Témiscouata and lower triangle = Webster).
Mentions: Broken-stick distribution indicated that only the two first PCs were informative. The first axis represents 50.6% of the variation and show variation among lakes (Figure 2). With the exception of Témiscouata Lake, dwarf Whitefish species also showed lower mean score on this axis than normal Whitefish (Figure 2). The second axis represents 35.7% of the variation and showed a clear distinction between all dwarf and normal Whitefish (Figure 2). Euclidian distance showed an increasing gradient in the following order: Webster (0.020; P-value = 0.032), Témiscouata (0.021; P-value < 0.001), Cliff (0.028; P-value < 0.001), East (0.032; P-value < 0.001), and Indian (0.038; P-value < 0.001). This gradient roughly correspond to the one observed with the juxtaposition of mean shape (Figure 3). In addition, all between-group PCA angles point in a similar direction (9−55°). Interestingly, the lower angle observed (Cliff: 9°) is linked to a ventral thinning in dwarf in comparison to normal Whitefish (Figure 3), the greater angle (Témiscouata: 55°) is linked to a dorsal thinning in dwarf (Figure 3) and the intermediary angles (Indian: 18°, Webster: 22°, and East: 25°) are linked to both ventral and dorsal thinning (Figure 3). Dwarf Whitefish also have bigger eyes and longer tails than the normal fish in all of the five lakes (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: The single-locus approach provided limited evidence for genetic parallelism.However, the polygenic analysis revealed genetic parallelism for three of the five lakes, which differed from the two other lakes.These results provide evidence for both genetic parallelism and multiple genetic routes underlying parallel phenotypic evolution in fish shape among populations occupying similar ecological niches.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut de Biologie Intégrative et des Systèmes (IBIS), Département de Biologie, Université Laval, Pavillon Charles-Eugène-Marchand, Québec, G1V 0A6, Canada uni.mlaporte@gmail.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus