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Composite Selection Signals for Complex Traits Exemplified Through Bovine Stature Using Multibreed Cohorts of European and African Bos taurus.

Randhawa IA, Khatkar MS, Thomson PC, Raadsma HW - G3 (Bethesda) (2015)

Bottom Line: Using comparative mapping information on human height, 30 candidate genes mapped at 12 selection regions (on 8 autosomes) could be linked to bovine stature diversity.Of these 12 candidate gene regions, three contained known genes (i.e., NCAPG-LCORL, FBP2-PTCH1, and PLAG1-CHCHD7) related to bovine stature, and nine were not previously described in cattle (five in European and four in African cohorts).Overall, this study demonstrates the utility of CSS coupled with strategies of combining multibreed datasets in the identification and discovery of genomic regions underlying complex traits.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Reprogen-Animal Bioscience Group, Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Sydney, Camden, 2570, New South Wales, Australia imtiaz.randhawa@sydney.edu.au.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of empirical and permuted CSS scores for localization of significant regions harboring stature-associated genes. Horizontal lines, labeled with cohorts (European large = 100%, European small = 60%, African small = 37.5%, and African large = 22.2%), indicate the percentage of significant genomic regions from each cohort that localized the stature associated genes. Vertical bars show the distribution of significant regions (%) harboring stature-associated genes in five sets of permutation cohorts that mimicked the empirical cohorts in matching colors.
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fig3: Comparison of empirical and permuted CSS scores for localization of significant regions harboring stature-associated genes. Horizontal lines, labeled with cohorts (European large = 100%, European small = 60%, African small = 37.5%, and African large = 22.2%), indicate the percentage of significant genomic regions from each cohort that localized the stature associated genes. Vertical bars show the distribution of significant regions (%) harboring stature-associated genes in five sets of permutation cohorts that mimicked the empirical cohorts in matching colors.

Mentions: Figure 3 shows a summary comparison of empirical and permuted cohort results. Overall, 8.3% of the significant regions based on permuted CSS in five sets (i.e., 20 permuted cohorts) contained stature-associated loci (Figure 3) that was in agreement with the 7% expected by chance (Figure S3). On average, only 6.7% and 9.8% of significant regions of permuted CSS from European and African cohorts had stature-associated genes as compared to 77.8% and 29.4% of empirical regions, respectively.


Composite Selection Signals for Complex Traits Exemplified Through Bovine Stature Using Multibreed Cohorts of European and African Bos taurus.

Randhawa IA, Khatkar MS, Thomson PC, Raadsma HW - G3 (Bethesda) (2015)

Comparison of empirical and permuted CSS scores for localization of significant regions harboring stature-associated genes. Horizontal lines, labeled with cohorts (European large = 100%, European small = 60%, African small = 37.5%, and African large = 22.2%), indicate the percentage of significant genomic regions from each cohort that localized the stature associated genes. Vertical bars show the distribution of significant regions (%) harboring stature-associated genes in five sets of permutation cohorts that mimicked the empirical cohorts in matching colors.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4502373&req=5

fig3: Comparison of empirical and permuted CSS scores for localization of significant regions harboring stature-associated genes. Horizontal lines, labeled with cohorts (European large = 100%, European small = 60%, African small = 37.5%, and African large = 22.2%), indicate the percentage of significant genomic regions from each cohort that localized the stature associated genes. Vertical bars show the distribution of significant regions (%) harboring stature-associated genes in five sets of permutation cohorts that mimicked the empirical cohorts in matching colors.
Mentions: Figure 3 shows a summary comparison of empirical and permuted cohort results. Overall, 8.3% of the significant regions based on permuted CSS in five sets (i.e., 20 permuted cohorts) contained stature-associated loci (Figure 3) that was in agreement with the 7% expected by chance (Figure S3). On average, only 6.7% and 9.8% of significant regions of permuted CSS from European and African cohorts had stature-associated genes as compared to 77.8% and 29.4% of empirical regions, respectively.

Bottom Line: Using comparative mapping information on human height, 30 candidate genes mapped at 12 selection regions (on 8 autosomes) could be linked to bovine stature diversity.Of these 12 candidate gene regions, three contained known genes (i.e., NCAPG-LCORL, FBP2-PTCH1, and PLAG1-CHCHD7) related to bovine stature, and nine were not previously described in cattle (five in European and four in African cohorts).Overall, this study demonstrates the utility of CSS coupled with strategies of combining multibreed datasets in the identification and discovery of genomic regions underlying complex traits.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Reprogen-Animal Bioscience Group, Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Sydney, Camden, 2570, New South Wales, Australia imtiaz.randhawa@sydney.edu.au.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus