Limits...
The influence of spatial ability and experience on performance during spaceship rendezvous and docking.

Du X, Zhang Y, Tian Y, Huang W, Wu B, Zhang J - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Results showed that experience moderated the relation between mental rotation ability and manual RVD performance.On one hand, novices with high mental rotation ability tended to perform that RVD task more successfully; on the other hand, experts with high mental rotation ability showed not only no performance advantage in the final stage of the RVD task, but had certain disadvantages in their earlier processes.Both theoretical and practical implications were discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: China Astronaut Research and Training Center Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Manual rendezvous and docking (manual RVD) is a challenging space task for astronauts. Previous research showed a correlation between spatial ability and manual RVD skills among participants at early stages of training, but paid less attention to experts. Therefore, this study tried to explore the role of spatial ability in manual RVD skills in two groups of trainees, one relatively inexperienced and the other experienced operators. Additionally, mental rotation has been proven essential in RVD and was tested in this study among 27 male participants, 15 novices, and 12 experts. The participants performed manual RVD tasks in a high fidelity simulator. Results showed that experience moderated the relation between mental rotation ability and manual RVD performance. On one hand, novices with high mental rotation ability tended to perform that RVD task more successfully; on the other hand, experts with high mental rotation ability showed not only no performance advantage in the final stage of the RVD task, but had certain disadvantages in their earlier processes. Both theoretical and practical implications were discussed.

No MeSH data available.


The joint influence of experience and spatial ability on angular deviation dynamics.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4502344&req=5

Figure 7: The joint influence of experience and spatial ability on angular deviation dynamics.

Mentions: In predicting angular deviance (see Figure 7), we found experience (G01 = −2.01, p < 0.001) and the interaction term (G03 = 0.183, p < 0.05) can predict the intercept (Slope Mean). While experts deviated less throughout the whole process, the effect of spatial ability on experts and novices was the opposite: high MRT novices performed better than their low MRT counterparts, while high MRT experts made more deviances during the process. The interaction term cannot predict the coefficient of the quadric term (G23 = 0.001, n.s.), however, it predicted the linear term (G13 = −0.018, p < 0.05). By plotting the curves of different groups, we found more detailed information regarding this relationship. For novices, participants having high MRT scores had a better rate of accuracy during the whole process constantly. For experts, while high MRT participants did worse in the initial stages, they “caught up” with their low MRT counterparts at the end of the process.


The influence of spatial ability and experience on performance during spaceship rendezvous and docking.

Du X, Zhang Y, Tian Y, Huang W, Wu B, Zhang J - Front Psychol (2015)

The joint influence of experience and spatial ability on angular deviation dynamics.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4502344&req=5

Figure 7: The joint influence of experience and spatial ability on angular deviation dynamics.
Mentions: In predicting angular deviance (see Figure 7), we found experience (G01 = −2.01, p < 0.001) and the interaction term (G03 = 0.183, p < 0.05) can predict the intercept (Slope Mean). While experts deviated less throughout the whole process, the effect of spatial ability on experts and novices was the opposite: high MRT novices performed better than their low MRT counterparts, while high MRT experts made more deviances during the process. The interaction term cannot predict the coefficient of the quadric term (G23 = 0.001, n.s.), however, it predicted the linear term (G13 = −0.018, p < 0.05). By plotting the curves of different groups, we found more detailed information regarding this relationship. For novices, participants having high MRT scores had a better rate of accuracy during the whole process constantly. For experts, while high MRT participants did worse in the initial stages, they “caught up” with their low MRT counterparts at the end of the process.

Bottom Line: Results showed that experience moderated the relation between mental rotation ability and manual RVD performance.On one hand, novices with high mental rotation ability tended to perform that RVD task more successfully; on the other hand, experts with high mental rotation ability showed not only no performance advantage in the final stage of the RVD task, but had certain disadvantages in their earlier processes.Both theoretical and practical implications were discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: China Astronaut Research and Training Center Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Manual rendezvous and docking (manual RVD) is a challenging space task for astronauts. Previous research showed a correlation between spatial ability and manual RVD skills among participants at early stages of training, but paid less attention to experts. Therefore, this study tried to explore the role of spatial ability in manual RVD skills in two groups of trainees, one relatively inexperienced and the other experienced operators. Additionally, mental rotation has been proven essential in RVD and was tested in this study among 27 male participants, 15 novices, and 12 experts. The participants performed manual RVD tasks in a high fidelity simulator. Results showed that experience moderated the relation between mental rotation ability and manual RVD performance. On one hand, novices with high mental rotation ability tended to perform that RVD task more successfully; on the other hand, experts with high mental rotation ability showed not only no performance advantage in the final stage of the RVD task, but had certain disadvantages in their earlier processes. Both theoretical and practical implications were discussed.

No MeSH data available.