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Nonprogressive Unilateral Intracranial Arteriopathy in Children with Arterial Ischemic Stroke.

Yeon JY, Shin HJ - J Korean Neurosurg Soc (2015)

Bottom Line: The nonprogressive unilateral intracranial arteriopathy known as transient (focal) cerebral arteriopathy is not a well-recognized arteriopathy among practitioners of Korea and Japan, although it cannot be easily differentiated from early moyamoya disease.This review summarizes the nomenclature, pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation, clinico-radiological features, and management of nonprogressive (reversible or stable) unilateral arteriopathy based on the relevant literature and our own experiences.Nonprogressive unilateral arteriopathy should be strongly suspected in children presenting with basal ganglia infarction and arterial beading.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
The nonprogressive unilateral intracranial arteriopathy known as transient (focal) cerebral arteriopathy is not a well-recognized arteriopathy among practitioners of Korea and Japan, although it cannot be easily differentiated from early moyamoya disease. This review summarizes the nomenclature, pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation, clinico-radiological features, and management of nonprogressive (reversible or stable) unilateral arteriopathy based on the relevant literature and our own experiences. Nonprogressive unilateral arteriopathy should be strongly suspected in children presenting with basal ganglia infarction and arterial beading. The early identification of patients likely to have nonprogressive or progressive arteriopathy would ensure proper management and guide further research for secondary stroke prevention.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Examples of reversible arteriopathy. Note the infarction involving the basal ganglia and arterial beading (white arrows) on digital subtraction angiography performed within 2 weeks.
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Figure 2: Examples of reversible arteriopathy. Note the infarction involving the basal ganglia and arterial beading (white arrows) on digital subtraction angiography performed within 2 weeks.

Mentions: The evolution of unilateral arteriopathy is determined as improved, worsened, or unchanged by comparing the findings (apparent luminal diameter as well as the longitudinal extent of arteriopathy and distal filling) of identical angiographic techniques (MRA or DSA). The overall course of unilateral arteriopathy is subsequently determined as reversible, progressive, or stable (indeterminate in cases with incomplete follow-up)67). Reversible unilateral arteriopathy is defined as an arteriopathy showing any improvement including normalization (Fig. 2). Initial (transient) worsening within 6 months (mostly within 1 month) is also considered indicative of reversible arteriopathy if the subsequent imaging demonstrates any improvement. Progressive unilateral arteriopathy is characterized by continued worsening of arteriopathy beyond 6 months or progression to bilateral arteriopathy.


Nonprogressive Unilateral Intracranial Arteriopathy in Children with Arterial Ischemic Stroke.

Yeon JY, Shin HJ - J Korean Neurosurg Soc (2015)

Examples of reversible arteriopathy. Note the infarction involving the basal ganglia and arterial beading (white arrows) on digital subtraction angiography performed within 2 weeks.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4502235&req=5

Figure 2: Examples of reversible arteriopathy. Note the infarction involving the basal ganglia and arterial beading (white arrows) on digital subtraction angiography performed within 2 weeks.
Mentions: The evolution of unilateral arteriopathy is determined as improved, worsened, or unchanged by comparing the findings (apparent luminal diameter as well as the longitudinal extent of arteriopathy and distal filling) of identical angiographic techniques (MRA or DSA). The overall course of unilateral arteriopathy is subsequently determined as reversible, progressive, or stable (indeterminate in cases with incomplete follow-up)67). Reversible unilateral arteriopathy is defined as an arteriopathy showing any improvement including normalization (Fig. 2). Initial (transient) worsening within 6 months (mostly within 1 month) is also considered indicative of reversible arteriopathy if the subsequent imaging demonstrates any improvement. Progressive unilateral arteriopathy is characterized by continued worsening of arteriopathy beyond 6 months or progression to bilateral arteriopathy.

Bottom Line: The nonprogressive unilateral intracranial arteriopathy known as transient (focal) cerebral arteriopathy is not a well-recognized arteriopathy among practitioners of Korea and Japan, although it cannot be easily differentiated from early moyamoya disease.This review summarizes the nomenclature, pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation, clinico-radiological features, and management of nonprogressive (reversible or stable) unilateral arteriopathy based on the relevant literature and our own experiences.Nonprogressive unilateral arteriopathy should be strongly suspected in children presenting with basal ganglia infarction and arterial beading.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
The nonprogressive unilateral intracranial arteriopathy known as transient (focal) cerebral arteriopathy is not a well-recognized arteriopathy among practitioners of Korea and Japan, although it cannot be easily differentiated from early moyamoya disease. This review summarizes the nomenclature, pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation, clinico-radiological features, and management of nonprogressive (reversible or stable) unilateral arteriopathy based on the relevant literature and our own experiences. Nonprogressive unilateral arteriopathy should be strongly suspected in children presenting with basal ganglia infarction and arterial beading. The early identification of patients likely to have nonprogressive or progressive arteriopathy would ensure proper management and guide further research for secondary stroke prevention.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus