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Infection control in the pulmonary function test laboratory.

Rasam SA, Apte KK, Salvi SS - Lung India (2015 Jul-Aug)

Bottom Line: Pulmonary function testing plays a crucial role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with lung diseases.Use of specialized techniques and equipment can also be of much use in a set up that has a high turnover of patients.This review aims at creating awareness about the possible pathogens and situations commonly encountered in a PFT laboratory.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Lung Function Testing Department, Chest Research Foundation, Pune, Maharashtra, India.

ABSTRACT
Pulmonary function testing plays a crucial role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with lung diseases. Cases of cross infection acquired from the pulmonary function laboratory, although rare, have been reported from various countries. It is therefore imperative to identify the risks and potential organisms implicated in cross infections in a pulmonary function test (PFT) laboratory and implement better and more effective infection control procedures, which will help in preventing cross infections. The infrastructure, the daily patient flow, and the prevalent disinfection techniques used in a PFT laboratory, all play a significant role in transmission of infections. Simple measures to tackle the cross infection potential in a PFT laboratory can help reduce this risk to a bare minimum. Use of specialized techniques and equipment can also be of much use in a set up that has a high turnover of patients. This review aims at creating awareness about the possible pathogens and situations commonly encountered in a PFT laboratory. We have attempted to suggest some relevant and useful infection control measures with regard to disinfection, sterilization, and patient planning and segregation to help minimize the risk of cross infections in a PFT laboratory. The review also highlights the lacuna in the current scenario of PFT laboratories in India and the need to develop newer and better methods of infection control, which will be more user-friendly and cost effective. Further studies to study the possible pathogens in a PFT laboratory and evaluate the prevalent infection control strategies will be needed to enable us to draw more precious conclusions, which can lead to more relevant, contextual recommendations for cross infections control in PFT lab in India.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Use of hand sanitizers between patients (b) Regular hand washing between patients
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Figure 1: (a) Use of hand sanitizers between patients (b) Regular hand washing between patients

Mentions: Simple procedures such as hand washing between two patients can reduce bacterial load on the hands by 77%, whereas hand washing with soap and water can reduce the bacterial load by 92%[21] Hand washing helps to render strongly adherent microorganisms of the transient bacterial skin flora inactive/nonviable [Figure 1a and b]. Iodophors, chlorhexidine gluconate, triclosan, biphenylol, and chloroxylenol are the various active agents used in preparing detergents for hand sanitizers. A one-minute hygienic hand wash with povidone–iodine (0.75%), chlorhexidine (4%), and a triclosan-based (0.1%) soap reduces the release of transient bacteria from artificially contaminated hands by 3.5, 3.1, or by 2.8 log, respectively.[22] Soap containing emollients are available and help prevent drying and cracking of the skin. Hand washing sinks should have hand elbow or wrist lever operated mixer taps or automated controls.


Infection control in the pulmonary function test laboratory.

Rasam SA, Apte KK, Salvi SS - Lung India (2015 Jul-Aug)

(a) Use of hand sanitizers between patients (b) Regular hand washing between patients
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4502201&req=5

Figure 1: (a) Use of hand sanitizers between patients (b) Regular hand washing between patients
Mentions: Simple procedures such as hand washing between two patients can reduce bacterial load on the hands by 77%, whereas hand washing with soap and water can reduce the bacterial load by 92%[21] Hand washing helps to render strongly adherent microorganisms of the transient bacterial skin flora inactive/nonviable [Figure 1a and b]. Iodophors, chlorhexidine gluconate, triclosan, biphenylol, and chloroxylenol are the various active agents used in preparing detergents for hand sanitizers. A one-minute hygienic hand wash with povidone–iodine (0.75%), chlorhexidine (4%), and a triclosan-based (0.1%) soap reduces the release of transient bacteria from artificially contaminated hands by 3.5, 3.1, or by 2.8 log, respectively.[22] Soap containing emollients are available and help prevent drying and cracking of the skin. Hand washing sinks should have hand elbow or wrist lever operated mixer taps or automated controls.

Bottom Line: Pulmonary function testing plays a crucial role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with lung diseases.Use of specialized techniques and equipment can also be of much use in a set up that has a high turnover of patients.This review aims at creating awareness about the possible pathogens and situations commonly encountered in a PFT laboratory.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Lung Function Testing Department, Chest Research Foundation, Pune, Maharashtra, India.

ABSTRACT
Pulmonary function testing plays a crucial role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with lung diseases. Cases of cross infection acquired from the pulmonary function laboratory, although rare, have been reported from various countries. It is therefore imperative to identify the risks and potential organisms implicated in cross infections in a pulmonary function test (PFT) laboratory and implement better and more effective infection control procedures, which will help in preventing cross infections. The infrastructure, the daily patient flow, and the prevalent disinfection techniques used in a PFT laboratory, all play a significant role in transmission of infections. Simple measures to tackle the cross infection potential in a PFT laboratory can help reduce this risk to a bare minimum. Use of specialized techniques and equipment can also be of much use in a set up that has a high turnover of patients. This review aims at creating awareness about the possible pathogens and situations commonly encountered in a PFT laboratory. We have attempted to suggest some relevant and useful infection control measures with regard to disinfection, sterilization, and patient planning and segregation to help minimize the risk of cross infections in a PFT laboratory. The review also highlights the lacuna in the current scenario of PFT laboratories in India and the need to develop newer and better methods of infection control, which will be more user-friendly and cost effective. Further studies to study the possible pathogens in a PFT laboratory and evaluate the prevalent infection control strategies will be needed to enable us to draw more precious conclusions, which can lead to more relevant, contextual recommendations for cross infections control in PFT lab in India.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus